Current Planning News and Events

Current Planning News and Events, Planning News Articles.
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Intensity not paramount for physical training during cancer therapy
People receiving treatment for cancer are known to feel better with physical training. But does it make any difference how vigorously they exercise? A new study by researchers at Uppsala University shows that whether the training is intensive or rather less strenuous, its effect is roughly the same. The results are published in the journal Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports. (2021-02-03)

When simpler is harder
Some languages require less neural activity than others. But these are not necessarily the ones we would imagine. In a study published today in the journal PLOS Biology, researchers at the University of Zurich have shown that languages that are often considered 'easy' actually require an enormous amount of work from our brains. (2021-01-27)

A new carbon budget framework provides a clearer view of our climate deadlines
Nature's Communications Earth and Environment just published a paper by a group of researchers led by Damon Matthews in which they present a new framework for calculating the remaining carbon budget that is able to generate a much narrower estimate and its uncertainty. The researchers estimate that between 230 and 440 billion more tonnes of CO2 from 2020 onwards can be emitted into the atmosphere and still provide a reasonable chance of limiting global warming to 1.5°C. (2021-01-19)

Frequent travel could make you 7% happier
People dreaming of travel post-COVID-19 now have some scientific data to support their wanderlust. A new study in the journal of Tourism Analysis shows frequent travelers are happier with their lives than people who don't travel at all. (2021-01-04)

Charging ahead for electric vehicles
Roads installed with wireless charging technology could become an integral feature of our cities in an electric vehicle future. (2021-01-03)

Scientists develop new land surface model including multiple processes and human activities
Researchers from the Institute of Atmospheric Physics developed a land surface model CAS-LSM that has improved the descriptions of biogeochemical process and urban modules, compared with the earlier version of this model. (2020-12-18)

Mandatory Biodiversity Net Gain may not deliver the desired outcomes for nature
England's proposed mandatory Biodiversity Net Gain requirement for new developments might not deliver on promises to increase biodiversity, according to research being presented at British Ecological Society's Festival of Ecology. (2020-12-16)

Pandemic fears driving firearm purchases
Stress related to the coronavirus pandemic and the uncertainty of what the future holds is motivating people to purchase firearms, a trend that may be more prevalent in those who already own firearms, according to a Rutgers study. (2020-12-16)

Study: Oregon's Western Cascades watershed to experience larger, more frequent fires
Projected changes in temperature and relative humidity are expected to lead to longer fire seasons and more severe fire weather in Oregon's Western Cascade mountains, which in turn will result in larger, more frequent fires. (2020-12-14)

Planning ahead protects fish and fisheries
Conservation of fish and other marine life migrating from warming ocean waters will be more effective and also protect commercial fisheries if plans are made now to cope with climate change, according to a Rutgers-led study in the journal Science Advances. (2020-12-11)

Algorithms and automation: Making new technology faster and cheaper
Additive manufacturing (AM) machinery has advanced over time, however, the necessary software for new machines often lags behind. To help mitigate this issue, Penn State researchers designed an automated process planning software to save money, time and design resources. (2020-12-08)

Scientists apply the METRIC model to estimate the land surface evapotranspiration in Nepal
Scientists apply the METRIC model to estimate the land surface evapotranspiration in Nepal (2020-11-24)

COVID-19 heightens urgency of advanced care planning, according to WVU study
West Virginia University researchers saw a sharp uptick in inquiries regarding end-of-life care in the first half of 2020, according to a study published in the Journal of Pain and Symptom Management. (2020-10-19)

Catholic OB-GYNs can face moral dilemmas in issues of family planning
A study of Catholic obstetrician-gynecologists shows that many face moral dilemmas when dealing with issues of family planning and abortion due to their religious faith, according researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. (2020-10-16)

Port engineers need guidance incorporating sea level rise into construction designs
A survey of maritime infrastructure engineers by University of Rhode Island researchers found that the rising sea level is often not factored into designs of ports, breakwaters, fishing piers and other coastal infrastructure. (2020-10-13)

Integrated terrestrial-freshwater planning doubles tropical freshwater conservation
Freshwater species are sometimes considered an afterthought in conservation planning, which typically prioritizes terrestrial ecosystems and their inhabitants. (2020-10-01)

Amazon study shows big conservation gains possible for imperilled freshwater ecosystems
A new study by an international team of environmental scientists in the Brazilian Amazon shows that redesigned conservation projects could deliver big gains for critical freshwater ecosystems - raising hopes for the futures of thousands of species. (2020-10-01)

Better conservation planning can improve human life too
Conservation planning can be greatly improved to benefit human communities, while still protecting biodiversity, according to University of Queensland research. PhD candidate Jaramar Villarreal-Rosas, from UQ's School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, said the benefits people receive from ecosystems - known as ecosystem services - are under increasing threat globally due to the negative impacts of human activities. (2020-09-22)

How birth control, girls' education can slow population growth
Education and family planning have long been tied to lower fertility trends. But new research from the University of Washington analyzes those factors to determine, what accelerates a decline in otherwise high-fertility countries. (2020-09-08)

Evaluating the effect of plain afforestation project and future spatial suitability in Beijing
Taking the 'One Million-Mu (666 km2)' Plain Afforestation (Phase I) Project in Beijing city as an example, the authors monitored the growth status of planted forest patches using long-term remote sensing images, which constructed a series of spatial variables of suitability map for afforestation. Moreover, a modeling framework of the spatial distribution of Phase II afforestation in this study can be used to support the decision making and policy implementation of afforestation projects in China. (2020-09-03)

As rural western towns grow, so do their planning challenges
A new study examines the planning challenges that residents and officials in the rural mountain American West have been watching unfold for years. The researchers specifically looked at over 1,500 'gateway communities' -- rural communities adjacent to national parks, forests, rivers and other outdoor recreational amenities. (2020-09-01)

How anxiety--and hope--can drive new product adoption
When considering new products, anxiety creates approach response (i.e., interest, purchase) rather than avoidance response (i.e., disinterest, failure to purchase) when consumers hope for the goal-congruent outcomes. (2020-08-12)

What will our cities look like after COVID-19?
UBC planning experts Jordi Honey-Rosés and Erick Villagomez analyze the implications of COVID-19 measures on city planning and space design. (2020-08-06)

Study shows demolishing vacant houses can have positive effect on neighbor maintenance
New research out of Iowa State University suggests that demolishing abandoned houses may lead nearby property owners to better maintain their homes. (2020-08-03)

A conversation game may reduce disparity in end-of-life care for African Americans
A Penn State College of Medicine research team found that playing a simple conversation game may encourage African Americans to make plans for their end of life care. Researchers say the game may be a useful tool in addressing the disparities in end-of-life care in African American communities. (2020-07-23)

Which way to the fridge? Common sense helps robots navigate
A robot travelling from point A to point B is more efficient if it understands that point A is the living room couch and point B is a refrigerator. That's the common sense idea behind a 'semantic' navigation system developed by Carnegie Mellon University and Facebook AI Research. That navigation system last month won the Habitat ObjectNav Challenge at the Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition conference (2020-07-20)

If it's big enough and leafy enough the birds will come
A new study from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology highlights specific features of urban green spaces that support the greatest diversity of bird species. The findings were published today in the journal Landscape and Urban Planning. The study focuses specifically on parks in New York City. It uses observations submitted to the eBird citizen-science database from 2002 through 2019 to estimate the variety of species found on an annual and seasonal basis. (2020-07-20)

Study reveals many great lakes state parks impacted by record-high water levels
UToledo student Eric Kostecky zeroed in on how coastal flooding and erosion in 2019 damaged park facilities, boat launches and roads and interrupted visitor experiences. (2020-07-07)

Breakthrough machine learning approach quickly produces higher-resolution climate data
Researchers at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed a novel machine learning approach to quickly enhance the resolution of wind velocity data by 50 times and solar irradiance data by 25 times--an enhancement that has never been achieved before with climate data. (2020-07-07)

Cranfield academics call for 'Five Capitals' approach to global resilience
Writing in the leading academic journal, Nature, Cranfield academics are calling for global resilience to be shaped around the 'Five Capitals' - natural, human, social, built and financial. The academics believe that too often silos exist within Government and within organisations and businesses that mean risks are not anticipated quickly enough or prepared for well enough. (2020-07-06)

Brain activity prior to an action contributes to our sense of control over what we do
Scientists have identified specific brain regions that contribute to humans' sense of agency - the implicit sense that we control our actions and that they affect the outside world. The findings suggest that brain activity involved in planning our next move is crucial to this sense of agency, supporting a 'constructive' hypothesis in which humans compare the predictions. (2020-07-01)

Energy storage using oxygen to boost battery performance
Researchers have presented a novel electrode material for advanced energy storage device that is directly charged with oxygen from the air. Professor Jeung Ku Kang's team synthesized and preserved the sub-nanometric particles of atomic cluster sizes at high mass loadings within metal-organic frameworks (MOF) by controlling the behavior of reactants at the molecular level. This new strategy ensures high performance for lithium-oxygen batteries, acclaimed as a next-generation energy storage technology and widely used in electric vehicles. (2020-06-17)

A Neandertal from Chagyrskaya Cave
Until now, only the genomes of two Neandertals have been sequenced to high quality: one from Vindjia Cave in modern-day Croatia and one from Denisova Cave in Siberia's Altai Mountains. A research team led by Svante Pääbo from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, has now sequenced the genome of a third Neandertal whose remains were found - 106 kilometres away from the latter site - in Chagyrskaya Cave. (2020-06-17)

Hunting in savanna-like landscapes may have poured jet fuel on brain evolution
Compared to the vast emptiness of open water, land is rife with obstacles and occlusions. By providing prey with spaces to hide and predators with cover for sneak attacks, the habitats possible on land may have helped give rise to planning strategies -- rather than those based on habit -- for many of those animals. (2020-06-16)

When board members get involved, corporate tax burden goes down
New research finds that corporate tax-planning practices improve when a company's board takes an interest -- and better planning results in both less tax uncertainty and a lower tax burden. (2020-06-15)

Women's health services adapting well to COVID-19, but concerns remain for long-term
The majority of women's healthcare units in the UK, including services such as maternity and gynaecological cancers, have adapted well to the initial COVID-19 outbreak, according to a new survey by University of Warwick researchers. (2020-05-27)

Survey shows parents' lack understanding of teens' with cancer preferred time to talk about end-of-life issues
Children's National Hospital study finds that family-centered pediatric advance care planning interventions are needed to close the gaps in families' knowledge of adolescents' end-of-life treatment preferences (2020-05-21)

Geometry guided construction of earliest known temple, built 6,000 years before Stonehenge
Researchers at Tel Aviv University and the Israel Antiquities Authority have now used architectural analysis to discover that geometry informed the layout of Göbekli Tepe's impressive round stone structures and enormous assembly of limestone pillars, which they say were initially planned as a single structure. (2020-05-12)

Emotional well-being while home gardening similar to other popular activities, study finds
Princeton researchers found that gardening at home had a similar effect on emotional well-being (or happiness) as biking, walking or dining out. The benefits were similar across racial boundaries and between urban and suburban residents, and it was the only activity out of the 15 studied for which women and people with low incomes reported the highest emotional well-being. The results suggest that household gardens could be key to providing food security in urban areas and making cities more sustainable and livable. (2020-05-11)

Using digital twins to design more sustainable cities
Over the past several years, a collaboration at HLRS has been developing a digital twin of Herrenberg, a small city just outside of Stuttgart, Germany. The Herrenberg study has already provided valuable information for city planners and government officials in the state of Baden-Württemberg, and paves the way for improving the model to include additional kinds of data. (2020-05-07)

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