Current Plant Diversity News and Events

Current Plant Diversity News and Events, Plant Diversity News Articles.
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Parasitic plants conspire to keep hosts alive
The plant that encourages kissing at Christmas is in fact a parasite, and new research reveals mistletoe has an unusual feeding strategy. When two mistletoes invade the same tree, they increase photosynthesis to get the nutrients they need, essentially sharing the tree and causing it less harm. (2021-02-23)

Multi-ethnic neighborhoods in England retain diversity unlike in the U.S.
Multi-ethnic neighborhoods in England retain their diversity and are much more stable than such neighborhoods in the U.S., according to geographers from the U.S. and U.K. The team examined how neighborhood diversity has changed on a national scale from 1991 to 2011 using U.K. Census data. (2021-02-23)

Plant responses to climate are lagged
Plant responses to climate drivers such as temperature and precipitation may become visible only years after the actual climate event. This is a key result of new research led by the German Centre of Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) published in Global Change Biology. The results indicate that climate drivers may have different effects on the survivorship, growth and reproduction of plant species than suggested by earlier studies. (2021-02-22)

Dozens of new lichen species discovered in East African mountain forests
The species diversity and relationships of lichens in the genus Leptogium, which are often very difficult to identify to species, were assessed on the basis of DNA analyses using a large dataset collected during more than 10 years from East Africa. (2021-02-22)

Unique study of isolated bobcat population confirms accuracy of extinction model
The reintroduction of 32 bobcats to an island off the coast of Georgia more than three decades ago created an ideal experiment to examine the accuracy of a genetic-modeling technique that predicts extinction of isolated wildlife populations. (2021-02-22)

Female heart disease patients with female physicians fare better
Female physicians have better patient outcomes compared with their male peers, while female patients are less likely to receive guideline-recommended care when treated by a male physician, according to a systematic review from the American College of Cardiology's Cardiovascular Disease in Women section published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (2021-02-22)

Salmon scales reveal substantial decline in wild salmon population & diversity
The diversity and numbers of wild salmon in Northern B.C. have declined approximately 70 per cent over the past century, according to a new Simon Fraser University study. (2021-02-22)

Don't focus on genetic diversity to save our species
Scientists at the University of Adelaide have challenged the common assumption that genetic diversity of a species is a key indicator of extinction risk. Published in the journal PNAS, the scientists demonstrate that there is no simple relationship between genetic diversity and species survival. But, Dr João Teixeira and Dr Christian Huber from the University of Adelaide's School of Biological Sciences conclude, the focus shouldn't be on genetic diversity anyway, it should be on habitat protection. (2021-02-22)

Pioneering research reveals gardens are secret powerhouse for pollinators
Home gardens are by far the biggest source of food for pollinating insects, including bees and wasps, in cities and towns, according to new research. (2021-02-21)

Researchers demonstrate new method to track genetic diversity of salmon, trout
Scientists at Oregon State University and the U.S. Forest Service have demonstrated that DNA extracted from water samples from rivers across Oregon and Northern California can be used to estimate genetic diversity of Pacific salmon and trout. (2021-02-21)

Time-lapse reveals the hidden dance of roots
New time-lapse videos capture something that's too slow for our eyes to see: the growing tips of plant roots make corkscrew-like motions, waggling and winding in a helical path as they burrow into the soil. By using time-lapse footage, along with a root-like robot to test ideas, researchers have gained new insights into how and why rice root tips twirl as they grow. (2021-02-19)

Electrical transmission lines have power to enhance habitat connectivity for wildlife
CORVALLIS, Ore. - Converting the ground under electrical transmission towers into spaces for wildlife can enable fragmented populations to connect with one another, increasing local biodiversity and providing animals around the globe an important tool for adapting to climate change, a new study found. (2021-02-19)

New recommendations aim to eliminate racial bias in myeloma trials
Recommendations designed to address the under-representation of African Americans in clinical trials for multiple myeloma (MM), a blood cancer that is twice as deadly in this demographic as in whites. (2021-02-18)

Increasingly fragmented tiger populations may require 'genetic rescue'
A new study reveals the lasting genetic impacts of increased isolation among different tiger subpopulations. (2021-02-18)

The distribution of vertebrate animals redefines temperate and cold climate regions
The distribution of vegetation is routinely used to classify climate regions worldwide, yet whether these regions are relevant to other organisms is unknown. Umeå researchers have established climate regions based on vertebrate species' distributions in a new study published in eLife. They found that while high-energy climate regions are similar across vertebrate and plant groups, there are large differences in temperate and cold climates. (2021-02-18)

More than half of Earth's rivers strongly impacted by human activity
Few of Earth's freshwater areas remain untouched by humans. More than half of the planet's freshwater river basins have been heavily impacted by human activities, according to a new study, which presents a novel, multi-faceted approach for evaluating biodiversity change at a global scale. (2021-02-18)

Breeding better seeds: Healthy food for more people
For thousands of years, farmers have worked to perfect their crops. Today, scientists use the latest advances to improve the foundation of civilization -- our seeds. (2021-02-17)

Silencing the alarm
Like a scene from a horror movie, tomato fruitworm caterpillars silence their food plants' cries for help as they devour their leaves. That is the finding of a multidisciplinary team of researchers, who said the results may yield insights into the abilities of crop plants -- such as tomato and soybean -- to withstand additional stressors, like climate change. (2021-02-17)

Skoltech's recent achievement takes us one step closer to Mars
Scientists have developed an artificial intelligence (AI) system that enables processing images from autonomous greenhouses, monitoring plant growth, and automating the cultivation process. In their article, they share the experience in the scope of controlled-environment agriculture automation in the Antarctic station greenhouse facility called EDEN ISS. (2021-02-17)

How to improve gender equity in medicine
Gender equity and racial diversity in medicine can promote creative solutions to complex health problems and improve the delivery of high-quality care, argue authors in an analysis in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2021-02-16)

Scientists of Kemerovo State University have developed a technology for creating in vitro root
Scientists of Kemerovo State University have developed a technology for creating in vitro root cultures with a high content of biologically active substances. (2021-02-16)

Ferns in the mountains
In a new study in the Journal of Biogeography an international team of researchers led by Harvard University assembled one of the largest global assessment of fern diversity. The study integrated digitized herbarium data, genetic data, and climatic data and discovered 58% of fern species occur in eight principally montane hotspots that comprise only 7% of Earth's land area. And within these hotspots, patterns of heightened diversity were amplified at higher elevations above 1000 meters. (2021-02-16)

Plant as superhero during nuclear power plant accidents
A collaborative study by a group of scientists from Iwate University, The University of Tokyo and Shimane University, Japan demonstrated for the first time that two ATP binding cassette proteins ABCG33 and ABCG37 function as potassium-independent cesium uptake carriers. (2021-02-16)

Perceiving predators: Understanding how plants 'sense' herbivore attack
Plants are known to possess solid immune response mechanisms. One such response is ''sensing'' attack by herbivorous animals. In a new review article, Prof. Arimura from Tokyo University of Science, Japan, discusses ''elicitors''--the molecules that initiate plant defense mechanisms against herbivore attack. He highlights the major types of elicitors and the underlying cellular signaling, and states that this could spur research on organic farming practices that could prevent the use of harmful pesticides. (2021-02-16)

A boost for plant research
Optogenetics can be used to activate and study cells in a targeted manner using light. Scientists at the University of Würzburg have now succeeded in transferring this technique to plants. (2021-02-16)

Researchers solve riddle of plant immune system
How do plants build resilience? An international research team led by the University of Göttingen studied the molecular mechanisms of the plant immune system. They were able to show a connection between a relatively unknown gene and resistance to pathogens. The results of the study were published in the journal The Plant Cell. (2021-02-16)

Membrane building blocks play decisive role in controlling cell growth
Lipids are the building blocks of a cell's envelope - the cell membrane. In addition to their structural function, some lipids also play a regulatory role and decisively influence cell growth. This has been investigated in a new study by scientists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU). The impact of the lipids depends on how they are distributed over the plasma membrane. The study was published in 'The Plant Cell'. (2021-02-15)

Evolution of cereal spikes
A research team led by Prof. Dr. Maria von Korff Schmising from Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf (HHU) and the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research (MPIPZ) in Cologne investigated the genetic regulation of spike development in barley and wheat. As reported in the current issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS), they discovered different barley mutants with wheat-like spikes. (2021-02-15)

Integrating maths and plant science to explain how plant roots generate a hormone gradient
The research team that developed a biosensor that first recorded that a distinct gradient of the plant growth hormone gibberellin correlated with plant cell size has now revealed how this distribution pattern is created in roots. (2021-02-15)

Drone-based photogrammetry: A reliable and low-cost method for estimating plant biomass
Remote sensing technology has become an increasingly common tool used to measure plant productivity without the need for costly and time-consuming field-based measurements. However, the equipment typically used to remotely measure vegetation has remained prohibitively expensive. Here, researchers used a low-cost drone and camera to create a photomosaic of a tallgrass ecosystem. By comparing their results with measurements collected in the field, they demonstrate that photogrammetry is an accurate and reliable method of estimating biomass. (2021-02-12)

Flowers of St. John's Wort serve as green catalyst
An interdisciplinary team of scientists from the School of Science at TU Dresden has for the first time used dried flowers of St. John's Wort (genus Hypericum) as an active catalyst in various photochemical reactions. This conceptually new and sustainable process was registered as a German patent and presented in the journal 'Green Chemistry'. (2021-02-12)

Biosensors monitor plant well-being in real time
Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, have developed biosensors that make it possible to monitor sugar levels in real time deep in the plant tissues - something that has previously been impossible. The information from the sensors may help agriculture to adapt production as the world faces climate change. The results have been published in the scientific journal iScience. (2021-02-11)

Protected areas see continued deforestation but at a reduced rate, OSU research shows
A survey of more than 18,000 land parcels spanning 2 million square miles across 63 countries shows that a ''protected area'' designation reduces the rate of deforestation but does not prevent it. (2021-02-11)

New insights to past ecosystems are now available based on pollen and plant traits
Researchers have mined and combined information from two databases to link pollen and key plant traits to generate confidence in the ability to reconstruct past ecosystem services. The approach can help understand how plants performed different benefits useful for humans over the past 21,000 years, and how these services responded to human and climate disturbances. (2021-02-11)

A plant's nutrient-sensing abilities can modulate its response to environmental stress
Understanding how plants respond to stressful environmental conditions is crucial to developing effective strategies for protecting important agricultural crops from a changing climate. New research led by Carnegie's Zhiyong Wang, Shouling, Xu, and Yang Bi reveals an important process by which plants switch between amplified and dampened stress responses. (2021-02-11)

Diversity in policing can improve police-civilian interactions
Black and Hispanic officers make far fewer stops and arrests and use less force than white officers, especially against Black civilians, when facing otherwise common circumstances. Hispanic officers also engage in less enforcement activity. Female officers of all races also use less force than males. (2021-02-11)

Finding the best targets to improve crop yield by following CO2 journey inside the leaf
A team of scientists have measured the relative importance of the different obstacles that carbon dioxide (CO2) encounters in its voyage from the atmosphere to the interior of plant cells, where it is converted into sugars. This research leading method provides much needed information that will help to increase the yield of important food crops such as cowpea, soybean and cassava. (2021-02-11)

Cataloguing genetic information about yams
New collection of resources will help yam breeders and farmers. (2021-02-10)

Plant-based diet and bone health: adequate calcium and vitamin D intakes should be ensured
In a study conducted at the University of Helsinki, partial replacement of animal protein with plant protein in the diet altered bone metabolism and decreased calcium and vitamin D intakes. (2021-02-10)

Ecological interactions as a driver of evolution
In a recent study, an international team of researchers including TUD botanist Prof. Stefan Wanke has investigated the origin of the mega-diversity of herbivorous insects. These account for a quarter of terrestrial diversity. The results of the study were recently published in the international journal Nature Communications. There the scientists show that the evolutionary success of insects may be linked to recurrent changes in host plants. (2021-02-09)

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