Current Plant Diversity News and Events | Page 25

Current Plant Diversity News and Events, Plant Diversity News Articles.
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Researchers map the evolutionary history of oaks
Oaks have a complex evolutionary history that has long eluded scientists. New research, however, provides the most detailed account to date of the evolution of oaks, recovering the 56-million-year history that has made the oaks one of the most diverse, abundant and important woody plant groups to the ecology and economy of the northern hemisphere. (2019-10-14)

Family of crop viruses revealed at high resolution for the first time
For the first-time we can take a molecular-level look at one of the world's deadliest crop killers. (2019-10-11)

Carnivorous plant study captures universal rules of leaf making
Leaves display a remarkable range of forms from flat sheets with simple outlines to the cup-shaped traps found in carnivorous plants. (2019-10-10)

Mapping white clover heritage
Pedigree analysis will help breeders develop clover varieties with desired traits. (2019-10-09)

Mechanism regulating species coexistence in a subtropical forest revealed
A research group led by Prof. MA Keping from the Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in collaboration with scientists from the University of Maryland, College Park and the Institute of Microbiology, have now revealed the underlying mechanism regulating species coexistence in a subtropical forest. (2019-10-09)

Scientists discover new antibiotic in tropical forest
Scientists from Rutgers University and around the world have discovered an antibiotic produced by a soil bacterium from a Mexican tropical forest that may help lead to a 'plant probiotic,' more robust plants and other antibiotics. Probiotics, which provide friendlier bacteria and health benefits for humans, can also be beneficial to plants, keeping them healthy and more robust. The new antibiotic, known as phazolicin, prevents harmful bacteria from getting into the root systems of bean plants. (2019-10-08)

New large-sized insect species discovered in tropical forest
Scientists at the Biodiversity Unit of the University of Turku in Finland have studied the diversity of tropical parasitoid wasps for years. Parasitoid wasps are among the most species rich animal taxa on Earth, but their tropical diversity is still poorly known. Recently, the research group sampled Afrotropical rhyssine wasps, which are among the largest wasps. Scientists from three countries and research institutes participated in the research led by the University of Turku research group. (2019-10-08)

Cheap as chips: identifying plant genes to ensure food security
An international team of scientists led by the University of Goettingen has developed a new approach enabling researchers to more efficiently identify the genes that control plant traits. This method will enable plant breeders and scientists to develop more affordable, desirable, and sustainable plant varieties. The application will be most valuable for the fruit, vegetable and grain crops that are critical for global food security and human nutrition. The research appeared in BMC Plant Biology. (2019-10-08)

How plants react to fungi
Using special receptors, plants recognize when they are at risk of fungal infection. This new finding could help cultivate resistant crops and reduce pesticide usage. (2019-10-07)

Nodulation connected to higher resistance against powdery mildew in legumes
Scientists have long known that nodulation is important to plant health. Nodulation occurs when nodules, which form on the roots of plants (primarily legumes), form a symbiotic relationship with nitrogen-fixing bacteria that deliver nutrients to the plant. This process is a key part of sustainable agriculture and makes legumes an important source of protein for much of the world. However, recent research shows that nodulation might positively impact the plant's microbiome in other ways. (2019-10-07)

Big data reveals extraordinary unity underlying life's diversity
Limits to growth lie at the heart of how all living things function, according to a new study carried out by ICTA-UAB researchers. (2019-10-07)

Machine learning helps plant science turn over a new leaf
Salk researchers have developed machine-learning algorithms that teach a computer system to analyze three-dimensional shapes of the branches and leaves of a plant. The study may help scientists better quantify how plants respond to climate change, genetic mutations or other factors. (2019-10-07)

The phenological index
As climate change accelerates, recording shifts in plant flowering times is critical to understanding how changes in climate will impact ecosystem interactions. To help measure these shifts, researchers have introduced a new quantitative measure of phenological status, called the 'phenological index,' that improves scoring of developmental stage in herbarium specimens, and predicts a higher degree of phenological advancement in response to climate change. (2019-10-03)

How the Texas puma saved the Florida panther
Scientists have pieced together the first complete picture of the Florida panther genome -- work that could serve to protect that endangered population and other endangered species going forward. (2019-10-03)

Plants alert neighbors to threats using common 'language'
New research from Cornell University shows that plants can communicate with each other when they come under attack from pests. (2019-10-03)

Ant-plant partnerships may play unexpected role in ant evolution
Partnerships between ant and plant species appear to arise from -- but not drive -- rapid diversification of ants into new species. Katrina Kaur of the University of Toronto, Canada, and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology. (2019-10-03)

Ancient genomes provide insight into the genetic history of the second plague pandemic
An international team of researchers has analyzed remains from ten archaeological sites in England, France, Germany, Russia, and Switzerland to gain insight into the different stages of the second plague pandemic and the genetic diversity of Yersinia pestis during and after the Black Death. The researchers reconstructed 34 Y. pestis genomes, tracing the genetic history of the bacterium, which revealed key insights into the initiation and progression of the second plague pandemic in Europe. (2019-10-02)

Plant diversity a casualty of high-severity wildfires
Wildfire is transforming some forestlands into shrublands, a UC Davis study finds. The results suggest these forests, which are used to living with and even benefiting from fire, have not yet adapted to this newer regime of intense, high-severity fires. (2019-10-02)

Understanding the genomic signature of coevolution
An international team of researchers including limnologists from the University of Konstanz shows that rapid genomic changes during antagonistic species interactions are shaped by the reciprocal effects of ecology and evolution. (2019-10-02)

Gene responsible for lutein esterification in bread wheat identified
Researchers have identified and confirmed the gene responsible for lutein esterification in bread wheat. The activity of this gene controls the timing of esterification in grain, which is related to storage and nutritional qualities of bread wheat and other grains. (2019-10-01)

Helping tobacco plants save water
Eleni Stavrinidou and her research group at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linköping University, have used bioelectronics to influence transpiration in a tobacco plant, without harming the plant in any way. (2019-09-30)

Pineapple genome sequences hint at plant domestication in a single step
An international team led by University of Illinois Professor of Plant Biology Ray Ming published their analysis of the genome of the red pineapple, a plant grown for fiber production and as an ornamental. (2019-09-30)

New function in a protein of plants essential to developing drought-tolerant crops
Researchers of the Universitat Politècnica de València and the University of Malaga have discovered a new function in the BAG4 plant protein. They prove that this protein takes part in the regulation of the plant transpiration, the transport of potassium in occlusive cells and thus, the opening of the stomas, the pores located on leaves, from where the plant transpires. This finding is particularly significant for developing crops that are more resistant to drought conditions. (2019-09-26)

Music is essential for the transmission of ethnobiological knowledge
Songs are a storehouse for ethnobiological knowledge and a means to construct, maintain and mobilize peoples' relations with their local environments. (2019-09-26)

How a protein connecting calcium and plant hormone regulates plant growth
A new Tel Aviv University study finds that a unique mechanism involving calcium, the plant hormone auxin and a calcium-binding protein is responsible for regulating plant growth. (2019-09-26)

Habitat connectivity increases plant diversity over decades
Restoring habitat connectivity may be a powerful tool in restoring lost plant biodiversity in fragmented ecosystems, a new study suggests. (2019-09-26)

New research reveals soil microbes play a key role in plant disease resistance
Scientists have discovered that soil microbes can make plants more resistant to an aggressive disease -- opening new possibilities for sustainable food production. (2019-09-25)

Discovery of sorghum gene that controls bird feeding could help protect crops
A single gene in sorghum controls bird feeding behavior by simultaneously regulating the production of bad-tasting molecules and attractive volatiles, according to a study publishing Sept. 23 in the journal Molecular Plant. This gene, called Tannin1, controls the synthesis of bird-deterring astringent polyphenols called tannins, as well as bird-attracting fatty-acid-derived volatile organic compounds. The authors suggest that the findings could lead to novel control strategies to protect major cereal crops worldwide. (2019-09-23)

Water may be scarce for new power plants in Asia
Climate change and over-tapped waterways could leave developing parts of Asia without enough water to cool power plants in the near future, new research indicates. The study found that existing and planned power plants that burn coal for energy could be vulnerable. The work was published today in the journal Energy and Environment Science. (2019-09-20)

Why the lettuce mitochondrial genome is like a chopped salad
The genomes of mitochondria are usually depicted as rings or circles. But in plants, 1 ring does not rule them all. A new study of lettuce shows that the mitochondrial genome often forms branching structures with elements that can be swapped around like a chopped salad. (2019-09-20)

Grains in the rain
Of the major food crops, only rice is currently able to survive flooding. Thanks to new research, that could soon change -- good news for a world in which rains are increasing in both frequency and intensity. (2019-09-19)

The next agricultural revolution is here
By using modern gene-editing technologies to learn key insights about past agricultural revolutions, two plant scientists are suggesting that the next agricultural revolution could be at hand. (2019-09-19)

Coral reefs and squat lobsters flourished 150 million years ago
An amazing trove of 150 million-year-old coral reef fossils from eastern Austria -- at the time a shallow sea -- provides a snapshot of a diverse and thriving community of creatures, including 53 species of squat lobsters. Neither lobster nor crab, they are a key part of today's coral reefs, but are likely to decline as coral dies, as happened to this reef 50 million years later with the drying up of the Tethys Sea. (2019-09-18)

The effects of variation in T6SS and bacteria on competition in host environment
A group of scientists studying the ways plant-associated bacteria interact were surprised to find that strains predicted to be more sensitive to bacteria were able to coexist with aggressor strains. 'Our findings are not consistent with a 'winner-take-all' result,' says Jeff Chang, 'and may cause researchers to think differently about bacterial behaviors that are generally assumed to be hostile and open new directions to pursue on the role of microbe-microbe interactions in plant-microbe interactions.' (2019-09-17)

A Matter of concentration
Researchers are studying how proteins regulate the stem cells of plants. (2019-09-17)

Eco-friendly method for the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles
Environmentally Friendly Way of Synthesizing Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Was Developed. UrFU scientists, together with their colleages (Bangladesh Engineering University), described a new method of obtaining magnetic nanoparticles. The substances contained in natural materials are unstable and enter into redox reactions with environmental components, which leads to the need to look for suitable stabilizers that are essential substances for newly synthesized nanoparticles. It has become one of the goals of research conducted by Ural scientists. (2019-09-16)

Study: We need more realistic experiments on the impact of climate change on ecosystems
When it comes to the impact of climate change on ecosystems, we still have large knowledge gaps. Most experiments are unrealistic because they do not correspond to projected climate scenarios for a specific region. Thus, we lack reliable data on what ecosystems might look like in the future, as a team of biodiversity researchers from Central Germany show in the journal 'Global Change Biology'. (2019-09-16)

Study shows importance of tailoring treatments to clearly defined weed control objectives
A new study in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management shows that working smarter, not harder, can lead to better control of invasive weeds. And the first step is to clearly define your weed control objectives. (2019-09-16)

Harnessing tomato jumping genes could help speed-breed drought-resistant crops
Once dismissed as 'junk DNA' that served no purpose, a family of 'jumping genes' found in tomatoes has the potential to accelerate crop breeding for traits such as improved drought resistance. (2019-09-16)

Hiding in plain sight
Early rice growers unwittingly gave barnyard grass a big hand, helping to give root to a rice imitator that is now considered one of the world's worst agricultural weeds. The new research from biologist Kenneth Olsen in Arts & Sciences is published this week in Nature Ecology & Evolution. (2019-09-16)

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