Current Plant Growth News and Events | Page 25

Current Plant Growth News and Events, Plant Growth News Articles.
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Renewable and nonrenewable energy in Myanmar's economic growth
An international group of scientists including a researcher from Ural Federal University developed a mathematical model that describes the influence of regenerative and non-regenerative energy sources on the economic growth of Myanmar. The work was published in the Environmental Science and Pollution Research journal and supported with a grant of the Russian Science Foundation. (2019-07-23)

Putting the brakes on lateral root development
Biologists have discovered a cellular transporter that links two of the most powerful hormones in plant development -- auxin and cytokinin -- and shows how they regulate root initiation and progression. Understanding why and how plants make different types of root architectures can help develop plants that better cope with distinct soil conditions and environments. (2019-07-23)

Strongman leaders make for weak economies, study finds
Autocratic leaders are often credited with purposefully delivering good economic outcomes, but new research challenges that long-held assumption. (2019-07-22)

Studies show the influence of environment on the evolution of weeds
Rapid increases in herbicide resistance show that weeds can undergo important genetic changes over very brief periods of time. But herbicide use isn't the only factor influencing the evolution of weeds. (2019-07-22)

ORNL scientists make fundamental discovery to creating better crops
A team of scientists led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory have discovered the specific gene that controls an important symbiotic relationship between plants and soil fungi, and successfully facilitated the symbiosis in a plant that typically resists it. (2019-07-22)

Are plant-based eating habits associated with lower diabetes risk?
This study (called a systematic review and meta-analysis) combined the results of nine studies and examined the association between adherence to plant-based eating habits and risk of type 2 diabetes in adults. The analysis included 307,099 adults with 23,544 cases of type 2 diabetes. (2019-07-22)

Following a healthy plant-based diet may lower type 2 diabetes risk
Greater adherence to predominantly plant-based diets was associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes compared to lower adherence to these diets. (2019-07-22)

Plants defend against insects by inducing 'leaky gut syndrome'
Plants may induce 'leaky gut syndrome' -- permeability of the gut lining -- in insects as part of a multipronged strategy for protecting themselves from being eaten, according to researchers at Penn State. By improving our understanding of plant defenses, the findings could contribute to the development of new pest control methods. (2019-07-22)

Cigarette butts hamper plant growth -- study
Researchers have shown for the first time that cigarette butts reduce plant growth. Cigarette butts are the most common form of litter worldwide, with an estimated 4.5 trillion discarded annually. (2019-07-19)

Tending the future of data analysis with MVApp
New app aims to improve the statistical analysis of large datasets in plant science and beyond. (2019-07-16)

Plant protection products: More clarity about residues in food
To what extent are residues of plant protection products contained in food? With a new orientation value (status indicator) established within the scope of the National Action Plan (NAP) for the sustainable use of plant protection products, the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) wants to create more clarity for consumers. (2019-07-16)

Health impairment through carbofuran in red chili unlikely
A regional laboratory found residues of carbofuran when analyzing frozen 'Red chili without stalks' for plant protection products. The Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture (BMEL) thereupon asked the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) to make a health assessment for the sample. The result was that a risk to the health of consumers is unlikely according to the latest available scientific knowledge. (2019-07-16)

New study on the immune system of plants: It works differently than expected
What happens at the molecular level when plants defend against invading pathogens? Previously it was assumed that the processes were roughly the same in all plants. This is not true, as a team of biologists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) shows in a new study in ''The Plant Cell''. The researchers investigated defence processes in the wild tobacco plant N. benthamiana and found that the processes work quite differently than previously thought. (2019-07-15)

UMD releases comprehensive review of the future of CRISPR technology in crops
CRISPR is thought of as 'molecular scissors' used to cut and edit DNA, but Yiping Qi, assistant professor at the University of Maryland, is looking far beyond these applications in his new publication in Nature Plants. In this comprehensive review, Qi explores the current state of CRISPR in crops, and how scientists can enhance traditional breeding techniques in nontraditional ways to a growing population in the face of climate change, diseases, and pests. (2019-07-15)

Early arrival of spring disrupts the mutualism between plants and pollinators
Early snowmelt increases the risk of phenological mismatch, in which the flowering of periodic plants and pollinators fall out of sync, compromising seed production. (2019-07-12)

Mystery behind striped barley solved
Albostrians barley is a model plant displaying variegation in form of green-white striping. The gene causing the albostrians-specific phenotype of variegation has now been identified as the CCT-domain gene HvAST. (2019-07-11)

Scientists discover a novel perception mechanism regulating important plant processes
Writing in 'Nature', scientists from Cologne (Germany) and Zurich (Switzerland) report on a discovery will lead to a better understanding of multiple processes in cells. (2019-07-11)

Gene identified that will help develop plants to fight climate change
Hidden underground networks of plant roots snake through the earth foraging for nutrients and water, similar to a worm searching for food. Yet, the genetic and molecular mechanisms that govern which parts of the soil roots explore remain largely unknown. Now, Salk Institute researchers have discovered a gene that determines whether roots grow deep or shallow in the soil. (2019-07-11)

Mustering a milder mustard
Cruciferous vegetables -- the mustards, broccolis and cabbages of the world -- share a distinct taste. But the same compounds that make them bitter also make them toxic at some levels. Biologists have mapped the crystal structure of a key protein that makes the metabolites responsible for the bitter taste in Brassicas. A study published this month in the journal The Plant Cell is the first snapshot of how the protein evolved and came to churn out such diverse byproducts in this agriculturally significant group of plants. (2019-07-11)

Designing a diet to repair the gut after childhood malnutrition
Jeanette Gehrig and colleagues have designed a diet that can help digestive tracts damaged by acute childhood malnutrition develop a mature gut microbial community, necessary for proper growth and functioning. (2019-07-11)

Nitrogen from biosolids can help urban soils and plant growth
Research determines bioavailable nitrogen content of different biosolid products. (2019-07-10)

Heat, salt, drought: This barley can withstand the challenges of climate change
A new line of barley achieves good crop yields even under poor environmental conditions. It has been bred by a research team from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), which crossed a common variety with various types of wild barley. The researchers then planted the new lines of barley in five very different locations around the world, observed the growth of the plants and analysed their genetic make-up. (2019-07-10)

Caterpillars turn anti-predator defense against sticky toxic plants
A moth caterpillar has evolved to use acids, usually sprayed at predators as a deterrent, to disarm the defenses of their food plants, according to a study publishing July 10, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by David Dussourd from the University of Central Arkansas and colleagues. (2019-07-10)

Genetic breakthrough in cereal crops could help improve yields worldwide
A team of Clemson University scientists has achieved a breakthrough in the genetics of senescence in cereal crops with the potential to dramatically impact the future of food security in the era of climate change. (2019-07-10)

Improved model could help scientists better predict crop yield, climate change effects
A new computer model incorporates how microscopic pores on leaves may open in response to light -- an advance that could help scientists create virtual plants to predict how higher temperatures and rising levels of carbon dioxide will affect food crops. (2019-07-09)

Growth failure in preterm infants tied to altered gut bacteria
Extremely premature infants who fail to grow as expected have delayed development of their microbiome, or communities of bacteria and other micro-organisms living in the gut, according to a new study published in Scientific Reports. (2019-07-09)

Researchers can finally modify plant mitochondrial DNA
Researchers in Japan have edited plant mitochondrial DNA for the first time, which could lead to a more secure food supply. Nuclear DNA was first edited in the early 1970s, chloroplast DNA was first edited in 1988, and animal mitochondrial DNA was edited in 2008. However, no tool previously successfully edited plant mitochondrial DNA. Researchers used their technique to create four new lines of rice and three new lines of rapeseed (canola). (2019-07-08)

Transformed tobacco fields could cuts costs for medical proteins
A new Cornell University-led study describes the first successful rearing of engineered tobacco plants in order to produce medical and industrial proteins outdoors in the field, a necessity for economic viability, so they can be grown at large scales. (2019-07-08)

Using an embryonic pause to save the date
A date palm seedling can pause its development to boost its resilience before emerging into the harsh desert environment. (2019-07-08)

New model forecasts anomalous growth patterns for substitutive products and behaviors
Data analysis shows that products that are considered to be substitutive in nature have a very different growth trajectory from traditional product models. (2019-07-08)

Plant nutrient detector breakthrough
Findings from La Trobe University-led research could lead to less fertilizer wastage, saving millions of dollars for Australian farmers. (2019-07-06)

Molecular oxygen sensing systems conserved across kingdoms
Researchers have discovered a biochemical oxygen sensing system conserved across biological kingdoms, which allows both plant and animal cells to sense and respond appropriately to changes in oxygen levels -- an ability central to the survival of most forms of life. (2019-07-04)

Plants don't think, they grow: The case against plant consciousness
If a tree falls, and no one's there to hear it, does it feel pain and loneliness? No, experts argue in an opinion article publishing on July 3 in the journal Trends in Plant Science. They draw this conclusion from the research of Todd Feinberg and Jon Mallatt, which explores the evolution of consciousness through comparative studies of simple and complex animal brains. (2019-07-03)

Novel computer model supports cancer therapy
Researchers from the Life Sciences Research Unit (LSRU) of the University of Luxembourg have developed a computer model that simulates the metabolism of cancer cells. They used the programme to investigate how combinations of drugs could be used more effectively to stop tumour growth. The biologists now published their findings in the scientific journal EBioMedicine of the prestigious Lancet group. (2019-07-02)

Irrigated farming in Wisconsin's central sands cools the region's climate
Irrigation dropped maximum temperatures by one to three degrees Fahrenheit on average while increasing minimum temperatures up to four degrees compared to unirrigated farms or forests, new research shows In all, irrigated farms experienced a three- to seven-degree smaller range in daily temperatures compared to other land uses. These effects persisted throughout the year. (2019-07-02)

Old-growth forest may provide valuable biodiversity refuge in areas at risk of severe fire
New findings show that old-growth forests, a critical nesting habitat for threatened northern spotted owls, are less likely to experience high-severity fire than young-growth forests during wildfires. This suggests that old-growth forest could be leveraged to provide valuable fire refuges that support forest biodiversity and buffer the extreme effects of climate change on fire regimes in the Pacific Northwest. (2019-07-02)

Well-meaning climate measures can make matters worse
Lifestyle changes can reduce our greenhouse gas emissions and help protect nature. While some actions offer great potential, some aren't as effective as we think and may even require more land and water, such as shifting to renewable energy. (2019-07-01)

Embracing bioinformatics in gene banks
Scientists from the IPK have explored, within a perspective paper, the upcoming challenges and possibilities of the future of gene banks. They emphasise that the advancement of gene banks into bio-digital resource centres, which collate the germplasm as well as the molecular data of the samples, would be beneficial to scientists, plant breeders and society alike. (2019-06-28)

Heart-healthy effects of soy consistent over time, University of Toronto meta-study finds
Researchers at the University of Toronto have found a consistent cholesterol-lowering effect for soy protein, with pooled data from dozens of clinical trials that span the last two decades. The study calls into question the US Food and Drug Administration's current proposal to revoke the health claim for soy protein and heart disease. (2019-06-27)

Towards a worldwide inventory of all plants
Declining biodiversity due to man-made habitat destruction and climate change means that information about plant diversity and its distribution across the planet is now crucial for biodiversity conservation. With the Global Inventory of Floras and Traits (GIFT), a team of researchers from the Department of Biodiversity, Macroecology and Biogeography at the University of Göttingen has taken an important step forward in documenting and understanding global plant diversity. The results appear in the Journal of Biogeography. (2019-06-26)

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