Current Plant Knowledge News and Events | Page 25

Current Plant Knowledge News and Events, Plant Knowledge News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 25 of 25 | 1000 Results
Research provides insight on survivability of rare Wyoming plant
The research found that despite the low density of the desert yellowhead -- there are fewer than 15,000 individual plants scattered across just 55 acres -- these populations survive partly because of a principle called negative density dependence. (2019-03-04)

How the humble marigold outsmarts a devastating tomato pest
Researchers from Newcastle University's School of Natural and Environmental Sciences, carried out a study to prove what gardeners around the world have known for generations -- marigolds repel tomato whiteflies. (2019-03-01)

Living together: How legume roots accommodate two distinct microbial partners
University of Tsukuba researchers, collaborating with two other Japanese universities, have revealed a key piece in the complex genetic systems that control how legume roots form close associations (symbioses) with microbial partners that help supply nutrients to the plant. They discovered a gene in the model legume, Lotus japonicus, that is crucial for enabling both nitrogen-fixing rhizobia bacteria and mycorrhizal fungi to colonize the roots. (2019-02-28)

How Capsella followed its lonely heart
The Brassicaceae plant family boasts a stunning diversity of fruit shapes. But even in this cosmopolitan company the heart-shaped seed pods of the Capsella genus stand out. (2019-02-28)

Research identifies mechanism that helps plants fight bacterial infection
A team led by a plant pathologist at the University of California, Riverside, has identified a regulatory, genetic mechanism in plants that could help fight bacterial infection. (2019-02-28)

New buzz around insect DNA analysis and biodiversity estimates
Researchers on the remote forested island of Hauturu, New Zealand have compiled a staggering inventory of invertebrate biodiversity using DNA sequencing, adding a significant number of invertebrates to GenBank - an open access database of all publicly available DNA sequences. The results are published this week in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecological Applications. (2019-02-27)

New research gives insight into warding off insect pests by way of nematode odors
A recent study revealed insect-killing nematodes also produce distinctive chemical cues that enhance plant defenses and deter Colorado potato beetles. Entomologists from Texas A&M University, including Dr. Anjel Helms, who led the study, and Penn State University took a look at whether Colorado potato beetles and potato plants responded to the presence of entomopathogenic nematodes, EPNs, or insect-killing nematodes. (2019-02-27)

Plant-based meals improve insulin and incretin secretion in those with type 2 diabetes
A plant-based diet improves the secretion of insulin and incretin hormones in those with type 2 diabetes, according to new research published in Nutrients. (2019-02-27)

How fungi influence global plant colonisation
The symbiosis of plants and fungi has a great influence on the worldwide spread of plant species. In some cases, it even acts like a filter. This has been discovered by an international team of researchers with participation from the University of Göttingen. The results appeared in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution. (2019-02-27)

Improving ecosystems with aquatic plants
Wetland restoration is critical for improving ecosystem services, but many aquatic plant nurseries do not have facilities similar to those typically used for large-scale plant production. This study attempts to determine what methods would effectively benefit the large-scale production of aquatic plants as a possible resource of bolstering the improvement of the ecosystems. (2019-02-27)

Tobacco plants transformed into 'green bioreactors' to benefit human health
Researchers at Western University and Lawson Health Research Institute are using tobacco plants as 'green bioreactors' to produce large quantities of a human protein called Interleukin 37, or IL-37. The protein is naturally produced in the human kidney in very small quantities and has powerful anti-inflammatory and immune-suppressing properties, providing potential for treating a number of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders like type 2 diabetes, stroke, dementia and arthritis. (2019-02-26)

The paper mulberry coevolved with soil microbes to humanity's benefit
The paper mulberry evolved its uniquely fibrous inner bark around 31 million years ago, long before the woody tree was first used for bookmaking during China's Tang dynasty. This adaptation, which makes the nutrient-rich plant easy to pass through foraging animals, may have been its way of feeding nearby soil microbes. Botanists in China discovered this connection in the first analysis of the Broussonetia papyrifera genome, published Feb. 26 in the journal Molecular Plant. (2019-02-26)

Insects hijack reproductive genes of grape vines to create own living space on plant
Grape phylloxera -- the insect that nearly wiped out wine production at the end of the 19th century in France -- hijacks a grape vine's reproductive programs to create a leaf gall, which it uses as a pseudo apartment for the parasite to siphon off the plant's nutrients. (2019-02-25)

An easier way to engineer plants
MIT researchers have developed a genetic tool that could make it easier to engineer plants that can survive drought or resist fungal infections. Their technique, which uses nanoparticles to deliver genes into the chloroplasts of plant cells, works with many different plant species. (2019-02-25)

With nanotubes, genetic engineering in plants is easy-peasy
Genetically modifying plants requires gene guns or bacteria to carry DNA into the cell, but the success rate is low. UC Berkeley researchers developed a quick, efficient way to deliver genes into plants: loaded onto carbon nanotubes. The nanotubes easily diffuse through the cell wall and the DNA is expressed in the nucleus and chloroplast. The gene does not insert into the genome, so outside the EU the modifications would not be considered GMO. (2019-02-25)

Breeding a better strawberry
An international team of scientists led by the University of California, Davis, and Michigan State University have sequenced and analyzed the genome of the cultivated strawberry, which will provide a genetic roadmap to help more precisely select desired traits. (2019-02-25)

Captured carbon dioxide converts into oxalic acid to process rare earth elements
Removing carbon dioxide from power plant emissions is a good idea to start with -- and it may have an extra economic benefit. A Michigan Tech engineering is presenting their results this week on turning carbon dioxide into oxalic acid, which is used to process rare earth elements for electronic devices. (2019-02-22)

How plants learned to save water
Plants that can manage with less water could make agriculture more sustainable. This is why a research team at the University of Würzburg is investigating how plants control their water balance. (2019-02-21)

Foreign bees monopolize prize resources in biodiversity hotspot
New research revealed that foreign honey bees often account for more than 90 percent of pollinators observed visiting flowers in San Diego, considered a global biodiversity hotspot. The non-native bees have established robust feral populations and currently make up 75 percent of the region's observed pollinators. Their monopoly over the most abundantly blooming plant species may strongly affect the ecology and evolution of species that are foundational to the stability of the region's plant-pollinator interactions. (2019-02-20)

Plants: How cell walls are assembled
Plant researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) are providing new insights into basic cell division in plants. The scientists have succeeded in understanding how processes are coordinated that are pivotal in properly separating daughter cells during cell division. In the renowned scientific publication The EMBO Journal, they describe the tasks of certain membrane building blocks and how plants are impacted when these building blocks are disrupted. (2019-02-20)

Native California medicinal plant may hold promise for treating Alzheimer's
The medicinal powers of aspirin, digitalis, and the anti-malarial artemisinin all come from plants. A Salk Institute discovery of a potent neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory chemical in a native California shrub may lead to a treatment for Alzheimer's disease based on a compound found in nature. The research appears in the February 2019 issue of the journal Redox Biology. (2019-02-20)

Plants can skip the middlemen to directly recognize disease-causing fungi
Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne have revealed that direct physical associations between plant immune proteins and fungal molecules are widespread during attempted infection. The authors' findings run counter to current thinking and may have important implications for engineering disease resistance in crop species. (2019-02-19)

Machine learning unlocks plants' secrets
Plants are master chemists, and Michigan State University researchers have unlocked their secret of producing specialized metabolites. (2019-02-18)

How to feed the world by 2050? Recent breakthrough boosts plant growth by 40 percent
Recent advances to address hunger through agricultural discovery will be highlighted at this year's annual meeting of the AAAS. Session speaker and University of Illinois professor Donald Ort will discuss the global food security challenge and a recent breakthrough in Science that boosted crop growth by 40 percent by creating a shortcut for a glitch that plagues most food crops. (2019-02-16)

Surprise findings turn up the temperature on the study of vernalization
Researchers have uncovered new evidence about the agriculturally important process of vernalization in a development that could help farmers deal with financially damaging weather fluctuations. (2019-02-15)

Linking sensing to signaling during plant immunity
A new study by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research (MPIPZ) in Cologne has revealed that a previously unappreciated structural feature underlies the ability of the plant immune molecule EDS1 to provide a timely defense boost against pathogens. (2019-02-15)

UTSA study: Stress in crops points to surprising benefits
Stress is known as the 'killer disease' and in humans it can lead to an increased risk of terminal issues such as heart attack or stroke. But now research conducted at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) and published in the latest issue of Plants indicates that stress in the plant kingdom is far less destructive to plants than it is to humans. (2019-02-14)

Aloe sanginalis, a new red Aloe from Somaliland
Aloe sanguinalis, or Somali Red Aloe, forms large, conspicuous clumps and has blood red sap. Its clumps can easily be spotted from the road, but the species has only just been named and described in the open access journal PhytoKeys. (2019-02-14)

Cryofixation and electron tomography reveals novel compartment in arbuscular mycorrhiza
The importance of the mycorrhizal symbiosis to plant growth has led to a large body of research into their formation and function, yet there are critical unanswered questions. Howard Berg, director of the Imaging and Microscopy Facility at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center and his collaborators have discovered a previously unknown compartment within these symbiotic cortical root cells that could be important for nutrient exchange and molecular communication between the symbiotic partners. (2019-02-13)

Nature prefers asymmetrical pollen grains, study finds
A study published in Cell shows that plants favor the production of uneven, asymmetrical patterns on the surface of pollen grains over more symmetrical patterns. (2019-02-12)

Scientists advance new technology to protect drinking water from Lake Erie algal toxins
Microbiologist Dr. Jason Huntley identified groups of bacteria in Lake Erie that degrade microcystin and can be used to naturally purify water. (2019-02-11)

Research characterizes evolution of pathway for reproductive fitness in flowering plants
Small RNAs are key regulators involved in plant growth and development. Two groups of sRNAs are abundant during development of pollen in the anthers. One of these pathways for sRNA production, previously believed present in grasses and related monocots, has now been demonstrated to be present widely in the flowering plants, evolved over 200 million years ago, and is arguably one of the evolutionary innovations that made them so successful. (2019-02-11)

Brazil-endemic plant genus Mcvaughia highlights diversity in a unique biome
A new species of the Brazil-endemic small genus Mcvaughia described as part of a extended revision of this unique group. Mcvaughia is a genus of the plant family Malpighiaceae comprising just three known species, all of which endemic to the unique and recently recognized Seasonally Dry Tropical Forests biome found in the Atlantic Forest and Caatinga domains in northeastern Brazil. The study was published in the open-access journal PhytoKeys. (2019-02-11)

DNA traces on wild flowers reveal insect visitors
Researchers have discovered that insects leave tiny DNA traces on the flowers they visit. This newly developed eDNA method holds a vast potential for documenting unknown insect-plant interactions, keeping track of endangered pollinators, such as wild bees and butterflies, as well as in the management of unwanted pest species. (2019-02-08)

New insights into radial expansion of plants can boost biomass production
Besides the obvious longitudinal growth, plants also enlarge in the radial sense. This thickening of plant stems and roots provides physical support to plants, provides us with wood and cork, and plays a major role in sequestering atmospheric carbon into plant biomass. The tissues responsible for this radial expansion are the vascular tissues which transport water and nutrients around plants and are visible as concentric circles in tree trunks known as annual growth rings. (2019-02-08)

Anther rubbing, a new movement discovered in plants, promotes prior selfing
Most plants have developed mechanisms to prevent self-fertilization and its detrimental effects of inbreeding depression. Traits promoting selfing in plants have been approached mainly from the perspective of a loss of function. However, the shift from cross-fertilization to selfing has been identified as one of the most frequent evolutionary transitions. Therefore, adaptive mechanisms actively promoting selfing should be usual in the plant kingdom, but, remarkably, they have not been frequently found. (2019-02-08)

CABI helps map ferocious speed and likely cause of woody weed spread across Ethiopia
CABI scientists have helped map the ferocious speed and probable cause of a devastating spread of the invasive alien tree Prosopis juliflora (Swartz DC) across an area equivalent to half of neighboring Djibouti in the Afar Region of northeastern Ethiopia. Dr. Urs Schaffner, who is supervising lead author Hailu Shiferaw for his Ph.D. studies, contributed to the Scientific Reports published paper which shows the Prosopis invaded 1.2 million ha of grassland/shrubland in 35 years. (2019-02-07)

Could theatre be way forward in communicating conservation messages?
Theatre performances in zoos can be effective in increasing knowledge of important conservation messages, a study at the University of York has revealed. (2019-02-07)

Symmetry, a resource that children spontaneously use to draw the plant world
Children love to draw and when they draw they portray the reality they see and know. They choose colors, shapes and subjects which at the same time express their level of maturity and conceptual development. These circumstances are the ones that make studying them attractive from various points of view. (2019-02-06)

Researchers investigate a billion years of coexistence between plants and fungi
What can a billion years of coexistence tell us about the evolution of plants and fungi? (2019-02-06)

Page 25 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.