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Current Plants News and Events

Current Plants News and Events, Plants News Articles.
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Unexpected culprit -- wetlands as source of methane
Knowing how emissions are created can help reduce them. (2019-06-19)
Electrons take alternative route to prevent plant stress
When plants absorb excess light energy during photosynthesis, reactive oxygen species are produced, potentially causing oxidative stress that damages important structures. (2019-06-19)
Directed evolution comes to plants
Accelerating plant evolution with CRISPR paves the way for breeders to engineer new crop varieties. (2019-06-19)
Aggressive, non-native wetland plants squelch species richness more than dominant natives do
Dominant, non-native plants reduce wetland biodiversity and abundance more than native plants do, researchers report. (2019-06-19)
A warming Midwest increases likelihood that farmers will need to irrigate
If current climate and crop-improvement trends continue into the future, Midwestern corn growers who today rely on rainfall to water their crops will need to irrigate their fields, a new study finds. (2019-06-18)
It's not easy being green
Despite how essential plants are for life on Earth, little is known about how parts of plant cells orchestrate growth and greening. (2019-06-14)
Exciting plant vacuoles
Researchers have filled two knowledge gaps: The vacuoles of plant cells can be excited and the TPC1 ion channel is involved in this process. (2019-06-14)
Part of the immune strategy of the strawberry plant is characterized
A University of Cordoba research group classified a gene family responsible for partial control of strawberry defense mechanisms when attacked by common pathogens in crop fields (2019-06-14)
UMBC research decodes plant defense system, with an eye on improving farming and medicine
The plant circadian clock determines when certain defense responses are activated (often timed with peak activity of pests), and compounds used in defense affect the clock. (2019-06-12)
Ancient pots from Chinese tombs reveal early use of cannabis as a drug
Chemical analysis of several wooden braziers recently excavated from tombs in western China provides some of earliest evidence for ritual cannabis smoking, researchers report. (2019-06-12)
The origins of cannabis smoking: Marijuana use in the first millennium BC
A chemical residue study of incense burners from ancient burials at high elevations in the Pamir Mountains of western China has revealed psychoactive cannabinoids. (2019-06-12)
Foraging for nitrogen
As sessile organisms, plants rely on their ability to adapt the development and growth of their roots in response to changing nutrient conditions. (2019-06-07)
U of G researchers discover meat-eating plant in Ontario, Canada
Pitcher plants growing in wetlands across Canada have long been known to eat creatures -- mostly insects and spiders -- that fall into their bell-shaped leaves and decompose in rainwater collected there. (2019-06-07)
Fertilizer plants emit 100 times more methane than reported
Emissions of methane from the industrial sector have been vastly underestimated, researchers from Cornell University and Environmental Defense Fund have found. (2019-06-06)
Sleep, wake, repeat: How do plants work on different time zones?
Researchers at the Earlham Institute, UK, have developed a new method to reliably measure plant circadian clocks and how different plants respond to day and night, and that these circadian rhythms change as they age. (2019-06-03)
UNH researchers find slowdown in Earth's temps stabilized nature's calendar
According to researchers at the University of New Hampshire, when the rate of the Earth's air temperature slows down for a significant amount of time, so can phenology. (2019-06-03)
Using population genetics, scientists confirm origins of root rot in Michigan ornamentals
Floriculture is an economically important industry in Michigan. The health of these crops is threatened by Pythium ultimum (root rot), a water mold that infects the roots of popular plants. (2019-06-03)
Native plant species may be at greater risk from climate change than non-natives
A study led by researchers at Indiana University's Environmental Resilience Institute has revealed that warming temperatures affect native and non-native flowering plants differently, which could change the look of local landscapes over time. (2019-05-31)
Scientists demonstrate plant stress memory and adaptation capabilities
Russian and Taiwanese scientists have discovered a connection between the two signalling systems that help plants survive stress situations, demonstrating that they can remember dangerous conditions that they have experienced and adapt to them. (2019-05-30)
The University of Cordoba guides plants towards obtaining iron
A team at the University of Cordoba relates the presence of beneficial organisms in plant roots to their response to iron deficiency. (2019-05-29)
Domino effect of species extinctions also damages biodiversity
The mutual dependencies of many plant species and their pollinators mean that the negative effects of climate change are exacerbated. (2019-05-28)
New mutations for herbicide resistance rarer than expected, study finds
New evidence suggests that herbicide resistance in weeds is more likely to occur from pre-existing genetic variation than from new mutations. (2019-05-28)
Bioengineers suggested ways to reduce crop losses caused by heat, cold and drought
Scientists of Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (FEB RAS), Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) and National Taiwan University comprehended state of the art scientific knowledge about plants stress response activated by unfavorable environmental factors. (2019-05-28)
To save biodiversity and feed the future, first cure 'plant blindness'
From the urban jungle -- even the leafier parts of suburbia -- we often have a tough time naming the last plant we saw. (2019-05-24)
How corn's ancient ancestor swipes left on crossbreeding
Determining how one species becomes distinct from another has been a subject of fascination dating back to Charles Darwin. (2019-05-24)
Plant stem cells require low oxygen levels
Joint Danish, Italian and German efforts reveal that low oxygen is required for proper development of plants. (2019-05-23)
Progress in hunt for unknown compounds in drinking water
When we drink a glass of water, we ingest an unknown amount of by-products that are formed in the treatment process. (2019-05-23)
How plants are working hard for the planet
As the planet warms, plants are working to slow the effect of human-caused climate change -- and research published today in Trends in Plant Science has assessed how plants are responding to increasing carbon dioxide (CO2). (2019-05-16)
A combination of two bacteria genera improves plants' health
For the first time researchers of BacBio Laboratory of the University of Malaga have evidenced that the combination of 'Bacillus subtilis' and 'Pseudomonas' bacteria can improve plants' health. (2019-05-14)
How potatoes could become sun worshippers
If the temperature is too high, potato plants form significantly lower numbers of tubers. (2019-05-14)
Native forest plants rebound when invasive shrubs are removed
Removing invasive shrubs to restore native forest habitat brings a surprising result, according to Penn State researchers, who say desired native understory plants display an unexpected ability and vigor to recolonize open spots. (2019-05-14)
A late-night disco in the forest reveals tree performance
A group of researchers from the University of Helsinki has found a ground breaking new method to facilitate the observation of photosynthetic dynamics in vegetation. (2019-05-13)
OU study expands understanding of bacterial communities for wastewater treatment system
A University of Oklahoma-led interdisciplinary global study expands the understanding of activated sludge microbiomes for next-generation wastewater treatment and reuse systems enhanced by microbiome engineering. (2019-05-13)
Study shows native plants regenerate on their own after invasive shrubs are removed
Invasive shrubs have become increasingly prevalent in the deciduous forests of eastern North America -- often creating a dense understory that outcompetes native plants. (2019-05-10)
Location is everything for plant cell differentiation
During development, plant cell differentiation is guided by location rather than lineage. (2019-05-09)
Finnish researchers discover a new moth family
Two moth species new to science belonging to a previously unknown genus and family have been found in Kazakhstan, constituting an exceptional discovery. (2019-05-09)
Plants and the art of microbial maintenance
How plants use chemicals to sculpt their ecological niche. (2019-05-09)
Close relatives can coexist: two flower species show us how
Scientists have discovered how two closely-related species of Asiatic dayflower can coexist in the wild despite their competitive relationship. (2019-05-07)
Essential tool for precision farming: new method for photochemical reflectance index measurement
Precision farming, which relies on spatially heterogeneous application of fertilizers, biologically active compounds, pesticides, etc., is one of the leading trends in modern agricultural science. (2019-05-07)
Ancient ritual bundle contained multiple psychotropic plants
A thousand years ago, Native Americans in South America used multiple psychotropic plants -- possibly simultaneously -- to induce hallucinations and altered consciousness, according to an international team of anthropologists. (2019-05-06)
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