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Current Plants News and Events, Plants News Articles.
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How severe drought influences ozone pollution
From 2011 to 2015, California experienced its worst drought on record, with a parching combination of high temperatures and low precipitation. (2019-04-10)
Disposable parts of plants mutate more quickly
Mutation rates are proposed to be a pragmatic balance struck between the harmful effects of mutations and the costs of suppressing them; this hypothesis predicts that longer-lived body parts and those that contribute to the next generation should have lower mutation rates than the rest of the organism, but is this the case in nature? (2019-04-09)
Just how much does enhancing photosynthesis improve crop yield?
In the next two decades, crop yields need to increase dramatically to feed the growing global population. (2019-04-08)
Scientists develop methods to validate gene regulation networks
A team of biologists and computer scientists has mapped out a network of interactions for how plant genes coordinate their response to nitrogen, a crucial nutrient and the main component of fertilizer. (2019-04-05)
Radiation and plants: From soil remediation to interplanetary flights
Currently, the study of the effects of ionizing radiation is of great relevance in the context of the challenges in the field of agriculture development, the existence of zones with an elevated natural and man-made radiation background, and the need to develop space biology. (2019-04-05)
Getting to the bottom of the 'boiling crisis'
Researchers from MIT and elsewhere review how a 'boiling crisis' can occur in environments such as nuclear power plants. (2019-04-05)
Science-based guidelines for building a bee-friendly landscape
Many resources encourage homeowners and land care managers to create bee-friendly environments, but most of them include lists of recommended plants rarely backed by science. (2019-04-05)
Novel Hawaiian communities operate similarly to native ecosystems
On the Hawaiian island of Oahu, it is possible to stand in a lush tropical forest that doesn't contain a single native plant. (2019-04-04)
Seed dispersal by invasive birds in Hawaii fills critical ecosystem gap
On the Hawaiian island of O'ahu, where native birds have nearly been replaced by invasive ones, local plants depend almost entirely on invasive birds to disperse their seeds, new research shows. (2019-04-04)
Ready, steady, go: 2 new studies reveal the steps in plant immune receptor activation
Two landmark studies provide unprecedented structural insight into how plant immune receptors are primed -- and then activated -- to provide plants with resistance against microbial pathogens. (2019-04-04)
Nanomaterials give plants 'super' abilities (video)
Science-fiction writers have long envisioned human-machine hybrids that wield extraordinary powers. (2019-04-03)
Insect-deterring sorghum compounds may be eco-friendly pesticide
Compounds produced by sorghum plants to defend against insect feeding could be isolated, synthesized and used as a targeted, nontoxic insect deterrent, according to researchers who studied plant-insect interactions that included field, greenhouse and laboratory components. (2019-04-03)
Fossil fly with an extremely long proboscis sheds light on the insect pollination origin
A long-nosed fly from the Jurassic of Central Asia, reported by Russian paleontologists, provides new evidence that insects have started serving as pollinators long before the emergence of flowering plants. (2019-04-01)
How do species adapt to their surroundings?
Several fish species can change sex as needed. Other species adapt to their surroundings by living long lives -- or by living shorter lives and having lots of offspring. (2019-03-29)
McSteen lab finds a new gene essential for making ears of corn
The new research, which appears in the journal Molecular Plant, extends the growing biological understanding of how different parts of corn plants develop, which is important information for a crop that is a mainstay of the global food supply. (2019-03-29)
Harnessing plant hormones for food security in Africa
Striga is a parasitic plant that threatens the food supply of 300 million people in sub-Saharan Africa. (2019-03-28)
What's in this plant? The best automated system for finding potential drugs
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) in Japan have developed a new computational mass-spectrometry system for identifying metabolomes -- entire sets of metabolites for different living organisms. (2019-03-28)
Speedier stomata in optogenetically enhanced plants improve growth and conserve water
By introducing an extra ion channel into the stomata of mustard plants, researchers have developed a new a way to speed up the stomatal response in their leaves. (2019-03-28)
Are no-fun fungi keeping fertilizer from plants?
Research explores soil, fungi, phosphorus dynamics. (2019-03-27)
Wastewater reveals the levels of antibiotic resistance in a region
A comparison of seven European countries shows that the amount of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater reflects the prevalence of clinical antibiotic resistance in the region. (2019-03-27)
Rice cultivation: Balance of phosphorus and nitrogen determines growth and yield
Cluster of Excellence on Plant Sciences CEPLAS at the University of Cologne cooperates with partners from Beijing to develop new basic knowledge on nutrient signalling pathways in rice plants. (2019-03-26)
New tool maps a key food source for grizzly bears: huckleberries
Researchers have developed a new approach to map huckleberry distribution across Glacier National Park that uses publicly available satellite imagery. (2019-03-26)
Venus flytrap 'teeth' form a 'horrid prison' for medium-sized prey
In 'Testing Darwin's Hypothesis about the Wonderful Venus Flytrap: Marginal Spikes Form a 'Horrid Prison' for Moderate-Sized Insect Prey,' Alexander L. (2019-03-26)
Droughts could hit aging power plants hard
Droughts will pose a much larger threat to U.S. power plants with once-through cooling systems than scientists previously suspected, a Duke University study shows. (2019-03-26)
Wagers winter plants make to survive
In a recently published study, UA ecologists have identified the bets that the most successful annual plants place with water resources. (2019-03-25)
Caterpillars retrieve 'voicemail' by eating soil
Leaf-feeding caterpillars greatly enrich their intestinal flora by eating soil. (2019-03-22)
Breakthrough in fight against plant diseases
A global research team including scientists from La Trobe University have identified specific locations within plants' chromosomes capable of transferring immunity to their offspring. (2019-03-20)
Study finds natural selection favors cheaters
Natural selection predicts that mutualisms -- interactions between members of different species that benefit both parties -- should fall apart. (2019-03-19)
Rabbits like to eat plants with lots of DNA
Rabbits prefer to eat plants with plenty of DNA, according to a new study by Queen Mary University of London and Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. (2019-03-19)
Excessive phosphate fertilizer use can reduce microbial functions critical to crop health
A team of scientists at Penn State University set out to determine if nutrient history changed the function of soil microorganisms. (2019-03-18)
Fighting leaf and mandible
Scientists have asked, 'What is the primary driver in tropical forest diversity-competition for resources, or herbivore pests?' For the first time, University of Utah biologists compared the two mechanisms in a single study. (2019-03-14)
Chemical innovation by relatives of the ice cream bean explains tropical biodiversity
The back-and-forth relationship between insects and their food plants may drive tropical biodiversity evolution according to work on Barro Colorado Island's 50 hectare plot in Panama. (2019-03-14)
Biologists have studied enzymes that help wheat to fight fungi
Scientists from I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University together with their Russian colleagues studied reaction of wheat plants to damage caused by pathogenic fungi. (2019-03-08)
'Specialized' microbes within plant species promote diversity
A Yale-led research team conducted an experiment that suggests microbes can specialize within plant species, which can promote plant species diversity and increased seed dispersal. (2019-03-07)
Houston, we're here to help the farmers
The International Space Station's ECOSTRESS gathers plant data. (2019-03-06)
Rain is important for how carbon dioxide affects grasslands
Vegetation biomass on grasslands increases in response to elevated carbon dioxide levels, but less than expected. (2019-03-06)
Climate-driven evolution in trees alters their ecosystems
A new study explores how climate, evolution, plants, and soils are linked. (2019-03-06)
The secret behind maximum plant height: water!
Ecologists from the South China Botanical Garden (SCBG) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences concluded that such coordination plays an important role in determining global sorting of plant species, and can be useful in predicting future species distribution under climate change scenarios. (2019-03-05)
Drying without dying: How resurrection plants survive without water
A small group of plants known as 'resurrection plants' can survive months or even years without water. (2019-03-03)
Cell editors correct genetic errors
Almost all land plants employ an army of editors who correct errors in their genetic information. (2019-03-01)
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