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UK wildlife calendar reshuffled by climate change
Climate change is already reshuffling the UK's wildlife calendar, and it's likely this will continue into the future, according to new research published this week in the journal Nature. (2016-06-29)
Jasmonate-deficient tobacco plants attract herbivorous mammals
Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, the University of Bern, Switzerland, and Washington State University demonstrated the importance of jasmonate-dependent nicotine production for the survival of tobacco plants which are attacked by mammalian herbivores. (2016-06-29)
Previously unknown global ecological disaster discovered
There have been several mass distinctions in the history of the earth with adverse consequences for the environment. (2016-06-28)
'Rule-breaker' forests in Andes and Amazon revealed by remote spectral sensing
It turns out that forests in the Andean and western Amazonian regions of South America break long-understood rules about how ecosystems are put together, according to new research led by Carnegie's Greg Asner. (2016-06-27)
Picky eaters: Bumble bees prefer plants with nutrient-rich pollen
Bumble bees have discriminating palates when it comes to their pollen meals, according to researchers at Penn State. (2016-06-27)
Fertilizer used during plants' production adds value for consumers
A study compared strategies using water-soluble fertilizers (WSF) and controlled-release fertilizers to provide adequate nutrition during production and consumer phases of petunia. (2016-06-27)
Where do rubber trees get their rubber?
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) in Japan along with collaborators at Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) have succeeded in decoding the genome sequence for Hevea brasiliensis, the natural rubber tree native to Brazil. (2016-06-24)
Energy from sunlight: Further steps towards artificial photosynthesis
Chemists from the universities of Basel and Zurich in Switzerland have come one step closer to generating energy from sunlight: for the first time, they were able to reproduce one of the crucial phases of natural photosynthesis with artificial molecules. (2016-06-24)
Arsenic accumulates in the nuclei of plants' cells
Toxic arsenic initially accumulates in the nuclei of plants' cells. (2016-06-24)
Science Bulletin published Special Topic on 'plant development and reproduction'
In plants, the process of development and reproduction is regulated by interactions of endogenous genetic mechanisms and environmental stimuli. (2016-06-23)
Bees are more productive in the city than in surrounding regions
Bees pollinate plants more frequently in the city than in the country even though they are more often infected with parasites, a factor which can shorten their lifespans. (2016-06-22)
Rare moth in severe decline at its last English site
Numbers of a rare species of moth -- found only in York in England -- have tumbled in recent years, a team including researchers from the University of York have discovered. (2016-06-22)
A 'Fitbit' for plants?
Knowing what physical traits a plant has is called phenotyping. (2016-06-22)
Plant kingdom provides 2 new candidates for the war on antibiotic resistance
New research has discovered peptides from two crop species that have antimicrobial effects on bacteria implicated in food spoilage and food poisoning. (2016-06-20)
Animal hormone is involved in plant stress memory
Regulating melatonin production in plants via drought priming could be a promising approach to enhancing abiotic stress tolerance of crops in future climate scenarios. (2016-06-17)
Improving poor soil with burned up biomass
Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science in Japan have shown that torrefied biomass can improve the quality of poor soil found in arid regions. (2016-06-17)
Scientists using sunlight, water to produce renewable hydrogen power
University of Iowa researchers are working with a California-based startup company to make clean energy from sunlight and any source of water. (2016-06-15)
Garlic mustard populations likely to decline
Garlic mustard, an invasive plant affecting forested areas in the Midwestern and Eastern United States, secretes a chemical called sinigrin into soil to deter the growth of other plants and decrease competition. (2016-06-14)
A new material can clear up nuclear waste gases
An international team of scientists at EPFL and the US have discovered a material that can clear out radioactive waste from nuclear plants more efficiently, cheaply, and safely than current methods. (2016-06-13)
Air purification: Plant hemoglobin proteins help plants fix atmospheric nitric oxide
Scientists of Helmholtz Zentrum München have now discovered that Arabidopsis thaliana plants can fix atmospheric nitric oxide with the aid of plant hemoglobin proteins. (2016-06-13)
New research uses novel approach to study plant mimicry
Batesian mimicry is a common evolutionary tool where unprotected species imitate harmful or poisonous species to protect themselves from predators. (2016-06-13)
New understanding of plant growth brings promise of tailored products for industry
In the search for low-emission plant-based fuels, new research could lead to sustainable alternatives to fossil fuel-based products. (2016-06-09)
Remarkably diverse flora in Utah, USA, trains scientists for future missions on Mars
Future manned missions to the Mars will rely heavily on training at sites here on Earth that serve as analogues to the red planet, such Utah's Mars Desert Research Station (MDRS), run by the Mars Society. (2016-06-09)
Pharmaceuticals in streams may come from multiple sources
Pharmaceuticals in surface water such as lakes and streams are a growing concern. (2016-06-08)
New cheap method of surveying landscapes can capture environmental change
Cheap cameras on drones can be used to measure environmental change which affects billions of people around the world, new research from the University of Exeter shows. (2016-06-07)
Mammals began their takeover long before the death of the dinosaurs
A new study refutes the traditional hypothesis that mammals took a backseat to dinosaurs and then got the opportunity to diversify when dinosaurs went extinct. (2016-06-07)
Genetic diversity important for plant survival when nitrogen inputs increase
Genetic diversity is important for plant species to persist in Northern forests that experience human nitrogen inputs. (2016-06-02)
Scientists discover oldest plant root stem cells
Scientists at Oxford University have discovered the oldest known population of plant root stem cells in a 320 million-year-old fossil. (2016-06-02)
Worldwide success of Tyrolean wastewater treatment technology
A biological and energy-efficient process, developed and patented by the University of Innsbruck, converts nitrogen compounds in wastewater treatment facilities into harmless atmospheric nitrogen gas. (2016-05-27)
Fungi -- a promising source of chemical diversity
The fungus Aspergillus fumigatus produces a group of previously unknown natural products. (2016-05-27)
Following tricky triclosan
Most US homes are full of familiar household products with an ingredient that fights bacteria: triclosan. (2016-05-25)
Scientists explore new concepts of plant behavior and interactions
While a lot is already known about plant perception, our ecological understanding of plants has largely focused on seeing plants as the sum of a series of building blocks or traits. (2016-05-25)
Ecosystems with many and similar species can handle tougher environmental disturbances
How sensitive an ecosystem is to unforeseen environmental stress can be determined, according to Daniel Bruno, previous visiting researcher at Umeå University. (2016-05-25)
Study of fungi-insect relationships may lead to new evolutionary discoveries
Zombie ants are only one of the fungi-insect relationships studied by a team of Penn State biologists in a newly compiled database of insect fungi interactions. (2016-05-24)
Bacteria in branches naturally fertilize trees
A University of Washington team has demonstrated that poplar trees growing in rocky, inhospitable terrain harbor bacteria within them that could provide valuable nutrients to help the plant grow. (2016-05-20)
Plant cell wall development revealed in space and time for the first time
Scientists have mapped changes in composition of plant cell walls over space and time, providing new insights into the development and growth of all plants. (2016-05-19)
How plants conquered the land
Research at the University of Leeds has identified a key gene that assisted the transition of plants from water to the land around 500 million years ago. (2016-05-19)
Plants are 'biting' back
Calcium phosphate is a widespread biomineral in the animal kingdom: Bones and teeth largely consist of this very tough mineral substance. (2016-05-19)
Making plants fit for climate change
Breeding barley that provides good yields even in a hot and dry climate -- a research team of the University of Würzburg is currently busy with this task. (2016-05-17)
How do trees go to sleep?
Most living organisms adapt their behavior to the rhythm of day and night. (2016-05-17)
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