Current Platelets News and Events

Current Platelets News and Events, Platelets News Articles.
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Innate immune system worsens the situation in severe COVID-19
In patients with severe COVID-19, the innate immune system overreacts. This overreaction may underlie the formation of blood clots (thrombi) and deterioration in oxygen saturation that affect the patients. This is shown in an Uppsala University study published in the journal Frontiers in Immunology. (2021-02-23)

Spintronics: New production method makes crystalline microstructures universally usable
New storage and information technology requires new higher performance materials. One of these materials is yttrium iron garnet, which has special magnetic properties. Thanks to a new process, it can now be transferred to any material. Developed by physicists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the method could advance the production of smaller, faster and more energy-efficient components for data storage and information processing. The physicists have published their results in the journal ''Applied Physics Letters''. (2021-02-23)

Scientists study use of abundant enzyme in tumor cells to monitor cancer treatment
After 14 years studying the action of the enzyme LMWPTP in tumor cells, Brazilian researchers conclude that the molecule is associated with chemotherapy resistance and metastasis. (2021-01-12)

The evolving role of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in plastic surgery
Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) treatment, which involves injecting a small amount of a patient's own blood to release various growth factors from platelets, continues to increase in popularity. The American Society of Plastic Surgeons has tracked the procedure since 2015 and reports a 25 percent increase in cosmetic PRP use in the last four years. (2020-12-28)

Survival protein may prevent collateral damage during cancer therapy
Australian researchers have identified a protein that could protect the kidneys from 'bystander' damage caused by cancer therapies. The 'cell survival protein', called BCL-XL, was required in laboratory models to keep kidney cells alive and functioning during exposure to chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Kidney damage is a common side effect of these widely used cancer therapies, and the discovery has shed light on how this damage occurs at the molecular level. (2020-11-25)

'Firefly' imaging method zooms in on 'the forces within us'
Scientists have developed a new technique using tools made of luminescent DNA, lit up like fireflies, to visualize the mechanical forces of cells at the molecular level. (2020-09-22)

EBMT trial shows improvements in treatment of Severe Aplastic Anaemia
The European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT), Europe's collaborative peer network of professionals working in the field of stem cell transplantation and cellular therapy, announced today the results of the phase III RACE trial during EBMTs virtual 46th Annual Meeting. Preliminary data show that adding Eltrombopag to standard immunosuppressive treatment is safe and increases response rates in patients with Severe Aplastic Anaemia (SAA). (2020-08-31)

COVID-19 less deadly and causes milder symptoms in children
Children and teenagers are less likely than adults to develop severe Covid-19 or die from the disease, according to the world's largest study of hospital patients with Covid-19. Obesity, Black ethnicity and being under one month old are factors that increased the risk of a child being admitted into intensive care with the condition, the report said. The findings also identify new symptoms of a severe inflammation syndrome that significantly increases the risk of children with Covid-19 needing intensive care. (2020-08-27)

Researchers unravel two mysteries of COVID-19
A team from Lawson Health Research Institute and Western University has made significant steps forward in understanding COVID-19 through two back-to-back studies published this week in Critical Care Explorations. (2020-08-26)

Exploring connections between ovarian cancer and blood cells
Recent discoveries made by researchers at Texas A&M University could change the way ovarian cancer is understood and treated. (2020-08-14)

COVID-19 - The virus and the vasculature
In severe cases of COVID-19, the infection can lead to obstruction of the blood vessels in the lung, heart and kidneys. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have now shown that activated immune cells and blood platelets play a major role in these pathologies. (2020-08-07)

Portable, injectable clotting agent could treat trauma victims on the front lines
In a hospital, internal bleeding can be controlled with the transfusion of clotting agents, such as platelets, but they require careful storage and refrigeration and can't be carried by first responders. Now, researchers report an injectable clotting agent that reduced blood loss by 97 percent in mice models. The freeze-dried agent, which has a physical consistency of cotton candy, can be stored at room temperature for several months and reconstituted in saline before injection. (2020-07-31)

Higher end of normal blood platelet count could indicate cancer
Blood platelet counts at the higher end of normal suggest a high risk of cancer in men aged 60 or over, and should be investigated, according to new University of Exeter research. (2020-07-27)

New drug targets clots: A potential treatment for heart attack and stroke prevention
Monash researchers have developed a drug that can be potentially given as a preventative against heart attack. The drug -- which has been studied in human cells and animal models -- literally blocks the minute changes in blood flow that preempts a heart attack and acts on the platelets preventing the platelet-triggered clot before it can kill or cause damage. (2020-07-22)

New antiplatelet drug shows promise for treating heart attack
Researchers have developed a new drug that prevents blood clots without causing an increased risk of bleeding, a common side effect of all antiplatelet medications currently available. A new study describes the drug and its delivery mechanisms and shows that the drug is also an effective treatment for heart attack in animal models. (2020-07-15)

Gut Piezo1 regulates gut and bone homeostasis via RNA sensing.
Gut enterochromaffin cells regulate gut and bone homeostasis via serotonin production. A recent report suggested that gut microbes regulate serotonin levels, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are unexplored. Here, Piezo1 is reported to be crucial for serotonin production from gut. Researchers discovered that bacterial derived RNA could activate Piezo1, leading to the production of serotonin from enterochromaffin cells, and that the RNA-Piezo1 axis could be an important target for treatment of bone and gut disorders. (2020-07-07)

COVID-19 causes 'hyperactivity' in blood-clotting cells
Changes in blood platelets triggered by COVID-19 could contribute to the onset of heart attacks, strokes, and other serious complications in some patients who have the disease, according to University of Utah Health scientists. The researchers found that inflammatory proteins produced during infection significantly alter the function of platelets, making them ''hyperactive'' and more prone to form dangerous and potentially deadly blood clots. (2020-06-30)

Clues to COVID-19 complications come from NET-like inflammatory response
An overactive defense response may lead to increased blood clotting, disease severity, and death from COVID-19. A phenomenon called NETosis -- in which infection-fighting cells emit a web-like substance to trap invading viruses -- is part of an immune response that becomes increasingly hyperactive in people on ventilators and people who die from the disease. (2020-06-29)

New evidence for how blood clots may form in very ill COVID-19 patients
Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs) have been implicated in causing excessive clotting in cancer patients. In this study, researchers show that the amount of NETs correlates with the severity of disease in COVID-19 patients. They also found that lungs of some deceased COVID-19 patients were dotted with micro-clots of NET-producing cells and platelets. (2020-06-29)

Novel function of platelets in tumor blood vessels found
Scientists at Uppsala University have discovered a hitherto unknown function of blood platelets in cancer. In mouse models, these platelets have proved to help preserve the vascular barrier which makes blood-vessel walls selectively impermeable, thereby reducing the spread of tumour cells to other parts of the body. The study is published in the journal Cancer Research. (2020-06-25)

Researchers attempt new treatment approach for blood cancer
In an effort to improve the survival of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms, a type of leukemia, researchers inhibited a specific protein (alpha5beta1 integrin) to decrease the number of large bone marrow cells (megakaryocytes) in an experimental model. An increase in megakaryocyte numbers is thought to be the cause of many problems observed in this disease. This type of treatment approach has never been attempted before. (2020-06-19)

Researchers make next-generation, high-toughness battery component
By combining a ceramic material with graphene, Brown University engineers have made what they say is the toughest solid electrolyte built to date. (2020-06-18)

Platelets exacerbate immune response
Platelets not only play a key role in blood clotting, but can also significantly intensify inflammatory processes. This is shown by a new study carried out by scientists from the University of Bonn together with colleagues from Sao Paulo (Brazil). In the medium term, the results could open up new ways to treat autoimmune diseases. They have now been published in the renowned journal Cell Reports. (2020-05-12)

More selective elimination of leukemia stem cells and blood stem cells
Hematopoietic stem cells from a healthy donor can help patients suffering from acute leukemia. However, the side effects of therapies are often severe. A group of researchers led by the University of Zurich have now shown how human healthy and cancerous hematopoietic stem cells can be more selectively eliminated using immunotherapy instead of chemotherapy in mice. The aim is to test the new immunotherapy in humans as soon as possible. (2020-05-08)

Inhibiting thrombin protects against dangerous infant digestive disease
A new preclinical study by researchers at the University of South Florida Health (USF Health) Morsani College of Medicine and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine offers promise of a specific treatment for NEC, a rare inflammatory bowel disease that is a leading cause of death in premature infants. The team found that inhibiting the inflammatory and blood-clotting molecule thrombin with targeted nanotherapy can protect against NEC-like injury in newborn mice. (2020-05-05)

New therapy could combat persistent joint infections in horses
A new therapy could combat persistent joint infections in horses, potentially saving them from years of pain. Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at North Carolina State University have developed a platelet-rich plasma (PRP) lysate that, when teamed with antibiotics, can eradicate bacterial biofilms common in joint infections. The therapy could also be applied to other species, including humans and dogs. The team presented their findings in the Journal of Orthopaedic Research. (2020-04-06)

Ticagrelor alone, without aspirin, shows benefit in patients with diabetes
Patients with diabetes who stopped taking aspirin three months after the insertion of a coronary stent and then took the anti-platelet medication ticagrelor alone for a year had fewer episodes of bleeding and no increase in heart attacks, stroke or other adverse events caused by blockages in the arteries, compared with patients who took both aspirin and ticagrelor for a year. The research was presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC). (2020-03-30)

Dropping aspirin for ticagrelor alone better in complex heart disease
The research, a subanalysis of the TWILIGHT trial, was presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC). (2020-03-30)

Benefit seen for ticagrelor alone, without aspirin, in patients with ACS
The research was presented at the American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology (ACC.20/WCC). (2020-03-30)

Blood platelets trigger events that cause organ damage after heart surgery
Damage to kidneys and other organs after heart surgery is not so much triggered by the surgical repair of the heart itself but rather by the massive inflammatory response, which arises from multiple factors: the machinery used to keep blood and oxygen flowing, changes of blood flow during the surgery, and tissue responses to the surgical trauma. (2020-03-18)

Clotting problem
New research into why some people's blood doesn't clot well identified defects in the platelet-making process, where mutant cells aren't behaving properly. Because these cells have a variety of different direction and movement issues, patients will need personalized drug therapies and treatments to treat patient-specific mutations. (2020-03-09)

A nacre-inspired separator coating for impact-tolerant lithium batteries
Recently, a research team from University of Science and Technology of China proposed a nacre-inspired coating on the separator to improve the safety of lithium battery under external impact. The study was published in Advanced Materials. They developed an alkaline-solution-induced etching method in the aragonite platelets to dissolve the protein matrix along with some parts of amorphous calcium carbonate to yield porous structure. (2020-02-25)

Study points to better medical diagnosis through levitating human blood
New research from the UBC's Okanagan campus, Harvard Medical School and Michigan State University suggests that levitating human plasma may lead to faster, more reliable, portable and simpler disease detection. The researchers used a stream of electricity that acted like a magnet and separated protein from blood plasma. Plasma is the clear, liquid portion of blood that remains after red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets and other cellular components are removed. (2020-02-19)

Fewer scars in the central nervous system
Researchers have discovered the influence of the coagulation factor fibrinogen on the damaged brain. (2020-01-31)

A new blood component revealed
Does the blood we thought to know so well contain elements that had been undetectable until now? The answer is yes, according to a team of researchers from Inserm, Université de Montpellier and the Montpellier Cancer Institute (ICM) working at the Montpellier Cancer Research Institute (IRCM), which has revealed the presence of whole functional mitochondria in the blood circulation. The discovery may deepen our knowledge of physiology and open up new avenues for treatment. (2020-01-23)

Platelets instead of spheres make screens more economical
ETH scientists have further developed QLED technology for screens. They have produced light sources that for the first time emit high-intensity light in only one direction. This reduces scattering losses, which makes the technology extremely energy efficient. (2020-01-20)

Sticky situation inside blood vessels can worsen stroke damage
A stroke appears to create a sticky situation inside the blood vessels of the brain that can worsen damage days, even months later, scientists report. (2020-01-15)

Study: Blood-clotting protein and blood platelets promote immune evasion, cancer progression
A new study led by researchers at The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC - James) reveals how a clotting protein and blood platelets can promote cancer progression and suppress immune responses to cancer. (2020-01-14)

Hitting HIT: Heparin therapy
Heparin is widely used as an anticoagulant, but evokes in some patients a potentially life-threatening condition called HIT. Clinical scientists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have now shown that inhibition of a single enzyme may markedly reduce this risk. (2019-12-20)

UTHealth's Cynthia Ju awarded NIH grants for liver injury research
Tiny solutions are being sought for big liver problems by a scientist at McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). (2019-12-20)

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