Current Poisoning News and Events

Current Poisoning News and Events, Poisoning News Articles.
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New weapon against resistant bacteria
Researchers have developed a new antibiotic that can help in the fight against resistant bacteria, and they hope it will reach the patients. (2021-02-10)

New research: Monitoring online posts by consumers could help improve food safety
An estimated 48 million cases of foodborne illness are contracted in the U.S annually, causing about 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths, according to CDC. In some instances, the source is well known, but 80 percent of food poisoning cases are of unknown origin. In a new study published by the journal Risk Analysis, proposes a new Food Safety Monitoring System that utilizes consumer comments posted on websites to identify products associated with food-related illnesses. (2021-01-26)

Lead poisoning of children
A remediation and public education effort at an abandoned battery recycling facility in Bangladesh eliminated most lead soil contamination, but levels of the toxic metal in children living near the site did not decrease nearly as much. The discrepancy reveals the scope of other lead exposure sources and the challenge they present to public health. (2021-01-14)

Shiga toxin's not supposed to kill you
E. coli food poisoning is one of the worst food poisonings, causing bloody diarrhea and kidney damage. But all the carnage might be just an unintended side effect, report researchers from UConn Health. Their findings might lead to more effective treatments for this potentially deadly disease. (2021-01-06)

Turning the heat down: Catalyzing ammonia formation at lower temperatures with ruthenium
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) report that the metal ruthenium, supported with lanthanide oxyhydrides, can efficiently catalyze the synthesis of ammonia at a much lower temperature than the traditional approach. In their new study, they highlight the advantages of the oxyhydride support and its potential in becoming a feasible catalyst for low-temperature ammonia synthesis in the future. (2020-12-23)

New salmonella proteins discovered
Only one small protein needs to be missing and salmonellae are no longer infectious. This was discovered in a study in which the pathogens were re-analysed using bioinformatics. (2020-12-16)

Do the benefits of Christmas outweigh its harms?
The Christmas season is associated with preventable harms from cards, tree decorations, and presents, as well as overeating and overdrinking, so do the benefits of Christmas outweigh the harms? In the Christmas issue of The BMJ, Robin Ferner and Jeffrey Aronson dig out some cautionary tales from the archives. (2020-12-16)

Is George's 'Marvellous Medicine' medically useful, dangerous, or both?
Increased time at home during the covid-19 pandemic may inspire budding scientists to search for a cure, but researchers in the Christmas issue of The BMJ warn of the potential toxicity of homemade potions. (2020-12-10)

Unmet job expectations linked to a rise in suicide, deaths of despair
The study, published in JAMA Network Open, is the first to link the rise in suicide and drug-poisoning deaths among men without a college degree to declines in working-class jobs. (2020-12-02)

Mine ponds amplify mercury risks in Peru's Amazon
The proliferation of pits and ponds created in recent years by miners digging for gold in Peru's Amazon has altered the landscape and amplified the risk of mercury poisoning, a new study shows. In some watersheds, there's been a 670% increase in land area covered by abandoned mining pits that have filled in with water. Low-oxygen conditions in these ponds accelerate the conversion of submerged mercury, a leftover from the mining, into highly toxic methylmercury. (2020-11-27)

Risk of death high among those with alcohol-related visits to ED: CMAJ study
The risk of death is high for people who visit the emergency department (ED) for alcohol use, and the risk increases with frequency, according to a new study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) (2020-11-23)

New study reveals poisoning exposures in Australian schools
New research from the University of Sydney has found poisoning exposures in children and adolescents while at school are relatively common and appear to be increasing, highlighting the need for more robust prevention measures. (2020-11-02)

Paracetamol poisonings up
In 2003, the painkiller paracetamol became available in Switzerland in tablets with a higher dose of the active ingredient. This correlates with an increase in cases of paracetamol poisoning in the country, as a data analysis by ETH researchers shows. (2020-10-28)

Smart solution to detect seafood spoilage
Existing methods for detecting seafood spoilage are far from satisfactory for ensuring food safety and security. To solve this problem, Flinders University researchers have constructed and tested a solid-state fluorescent sensor loaded on filter papers that can instantly and accurately measure the rate of spoilage in Atlantic salmon - and can easily be applied to other seafood. (2020-10-28)

Preventing lead poisoning at the source
Using a variety of public records, researchers from Case Western Reserve University examined every rental property in Cleveland from 2016-18 on factors related to the likelihood that the property could have lead-safety problems. (2020-10-22)

Invisible threat: Listeria in smoked fish
Fish should be a regular component of our diets. It is an important source of biologically high-quality and easily digestible protein, minerals and vitamins. However, raw, smoked and cured fish products also often contain pathogenic germs, notably listeria. People can become infected by eating contaminated food and become ill with listeriosis. (2020-10-07)

800 million children still exposed to lead
Every third child in the world has too much lead in their body, according to a report from UNICEF and Pure Earth. Norwegian children are also affected. (2020-10-01)

A better informed society can prevent lead poisoning disasters
In a paper published Sept. 8 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, John R. Scully and Raymond J. Santucci address unresolved scientific questions that can help avert future lead poisoning disasters. A better-informed society can prevent such disasters from happening through improved risk assessment, anticipation and management of factors affecting lead release. (2020-09-18)

Machine learning models identify kids at risk of lead poisoning
Machine learning can help public health officials identify children most at risk of lead poisoning, enabling them to concentrate their limited resources on preventing poisonings rather than remediating homes only after a child suffers elevated blood lead levels, a new study shows. (2020-09-16)

Life expectancy gap between Black and white people in Washington, DC, analyzed
Heart disease, homicide and cancer are leading contributing factors to stark differences in life expectancy between Black people and white people in Washington, DC, according to a study published in Scientific Reports. (2020-08-27)

Lead poisoning could reduce gene expression in humans
Scientists have unveiled a correlation between high blood lead levels in children and methylation of genes involved in haem synthesis and carcinogenesis, indicating a previously unknown mechanism for lead poisoning. (2020-08-07)

Inconsistent EPA regulations increase lead poisoning risk to kids, study finds
As new lead protection rules from the Environmental Protection Agency move toward finalization, research shows that tens of thousands of children are at increased risk under the current set of inconsistent standards. (2020-08-06)

Scientists find new way to kill tuberculosis
Scientists have discovered a new way of killing the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB), using a toxin produced by the germ itself. (2020-07-29)

UMD addresses African vulture poisoning with global disease and biodiversity implications
In a new paper published in Global Ecology and Conservation, University of Maryland researchers collaborated with international leaders in wildlife conservation to produce recommendations for vulture poisoning control in Southern Africa. Vultures act as nature's most critical scavengers, working as ecosystem garbage disposals and disinfectors to maintain animal, environmental, and human health. Findings highlight the issue from a conservation and criminology perspective, recommending a more coordinated and holistic approach to regulation, education, and enforcement. (2020-07-23)

Scientists reveal why tummy bugs are so good at swimming through your gut
Researchers have solved the mystery of why a species of bacteria that causes food poisoning can swim faster in stickier liquids, such as within guts. (2020-07-02)

Cannabis poisonings in children linked with drinking and illicit drug use
Most cannabis poisoning incidents involving children resulted from the intentional use of cannabis combined with alcohol, illicit drugs and/or medication, new research suggests. (2020-06-10)

Regularly attending religious services associated with lower risk of deaths of despair
People who attended religious services at least once a week were significantly less likely to die from 'deaths of despair,' including deaths related to suicide, drug overdose, and alcohol poisoning, according to new research led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health (2020-05-06)

Trump and public demand for unproven COVID-19 therapies
A new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine finds that public demand for two unproven COVID-19 therapies massively increased following endorsements by President Donald Trump and entrepreneur Elon Musk. (2020-04-29)

New DNA test will improve tracking of Salmonella food-poisoning outbreaks
Researchers report the development of a sensitive and specific assay to detect different serotypes of Salmonella, paving the way for rapid serotyping directly from specimens. This improvement upon current testing methods can play a critical role in quickly tracing the origin of the infection. The report appears in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, published by Elsevier. (2020-04-28)

N-doped porous carbon supported Fe single atom catalysts for highly efficient ORR
Researchers report a precursor-dilution strategy to synthesize Fe SACs through the Schiff-based reaction via co-polycondensation of amino-metalloporphyrin, followed by pyrolysis at high temperature. Their catalyst shows superior ORR performances in the alkaline condition and moderate activity under the acidic condition, excellent methanol tolerance and good long-term stability. All the results indicate Fe SACs would be a promising candidate for replacing the precious Pt in metal-air batteries and fuel cells. (2020-04-15)

Cases of poisoning: Liquids containing cannabidiols for e-cigarettes can be manipulated
The health risks of e-cigarettes have come into focus after the deaths of several 'vapers' due to lung injury in the USA recently. These health risks were discussed in press reports on eight young people who were poisoned in Bremerhaven in October 2019. Patients suffered from convulsive seizures, impaired consciousness and memory, and heart palpitations. (2020-02-26)

New test identifies poisonous mushrooms
A simple, portable test that can detect the deadliest of the mushroom poisons in minutes has been developed by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists. Eating toxic mushrooms causes more than 100 deaths a year, globally, and leaves thousands of people in need of urgent medical assistance. Amanitin is the class of mushroom toxins that cause the most serious issues. (2020-02-19)

New potential cause of Minamata mercury poisoning identified
One of the world's most horrific environmental disasters--the 1950 and 60s mercury poisoning in Minamata, Japan--may have been caused by a previously unstudied form of mercury discharged directly from a chemical factory, research by the University of Saskatchewan (USask) has found. (2020-02-13)

Empty SV40 capsids increase survival of septic rats by eliciting numerous host signaling networks
The cover for issue 6 of Oncotarget features Figure 3, 'The effect of NCs treatments on routine lab results during disease and recovery progress,' by Ben-Nun-Shaul, et al. (2020-02-12)

In fighting gut infections, nervous system is key, Yale-Harvard team finds
The peaceful and delicate co-existence of friendly gut bacteria and the immune system relies on highly coordinated information exchange between immune system cells and certain cells lining the intestine. Scaientists at Yale and Harvard medical schools have discovered that, in response to bacterial invaders, nerve cells within the intestine -- and not immune cells or cells lining the intestinal wall -- release infection-fighting cytokines. (2020-01-09)

Study supports long-term benefits of non-drug therapies for pain
A new study finds that non-drug therapies given to service members with chronic pain may reduce the risk of long-term adverse outcomes, such as alcohol and drug disorder and self-induced injuries, including suicide attempts. (2019-12-11)

Study finds decrease in eye exposures from household cleaners; eEperts urge proper storage
A new study conducted by the Center for Injury Research and Policy and the Central Ohio Poison Center at Nationwide Children's Hospital analyzed data regarding eye exposures associated with household cleaning products from 2000 through 2016 and found a decrease in the number of exposures during this period. However, the number of these exposures among young children remains high. (2019-12-08)

Revealed: The deadly superbugs lurking in more than nine in ten make-up bags
The vast majority of in-use make-up products such as beauty blenders, mascara and lip gloss are contaminated with potentially life threatening superbugs, new research from Aston University published in the Journal of Applied Microbiology has revealed. (2019-12-02)

Study: Increase in calls to US poison control for natural psychoactive substances
A new study conducted by the Center for Injury Research and Policy and the Central Ohio Poison Center at Nationwide Children's Hospital found there were more than 67,300 calls to US Poison Control Centers regarding exposures to natural psychoactive substances. The study looked at calls from January 2000 through December 2017, which totaled an average of 3,743 exposures each year, or approximately 10 calls every day. (2019-11-26)

Scientists make vampire bats 'glow' to simulate vaccine spread
University of Michigan scientists and their colleagues used glowing fluorescent gel to test the potential effectiveness of vaccines to control rabies and other diseases in wild bats. (2019-11-18)

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