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Current Poisoning News and Events, Poisoning News Articles.
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State prescription drug monitoring programs: The rise and fall in heroin fatalities
A new study found a consistent association between the adoption of state Prescription Drug Monitoring programs (PDMP) and death rates from heroin poisoning. However, the research showed that rates vary by program type. States with Proactive Prescription Drug Monitoring programs, which are more likely to report outlying prescribing and dispensing and provide broader access to law enforcement, reported a 6 percent reduction in heroin poisoning mortality by the program's third year. (2019-11-14)

Study finds youth suicide rates rise with community poverty levels
Research being presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) 2019 National Conference & Exhibition shows that US children living in counties with the highest poverty level are more than one-third more likely to die by suicide than those living in the least impoverished counties. The association is most pronounced for suicide by firearms. (2019-10-25)

Poor toilet hygiene, not food, spreads antibiotic-resistant E. coli superbugs
New research shows that antibiotic-resistant E.coli superbugs are spread through poor toilet hygiene, not undercooked chicken or other food. Scientists sequenced the genomes of resistant E. coli from sources including human bloodstream infections, faeces and sewerage, animal slurry and meat including beef, pork, chicken, fruit and salad. While we must carry on cooking chicken well and never alternately handle raw meat and salad, in the case of ESBL-E.coli -- it's more important to wash hands after going to the toilet. (2019-10-22)

Lead poisoning reduced with safer mining practices
We report on an extremely successful and novel project to reduce lead poisoning among artisanal gold miners in Nigeria.  This report highlights the success of OK International in partnership with Doctors Without Borders to introduce safer mining practices in an area where thousands are severely lead poisoned and where hundreds of deaths have been recorded from acute poisoning. This ongoing tragedy is known as the world's worst lead poisoning outbreak. (2019-10-21)

Study finds topsoil is key harbinger of lead exposure risks for children
Tracking lead levels in soil over time is critical for cities to determine lead contamination risks for their youngest and most vulnerable residents, according to a new Tulane University study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2019-10-14)

Protecting smart machines from smart attacks
Machines' ability to learn by processing data gleaned from sensors underlies automated vehicles, medical devices and a host of other emerging technologies. But that learning ability leaves systems vulnerable to hackers in unexpected ways, researchers at Princeton University have found. (2019-10-14)

Light-based strategy effectively treats carbon monoxide poisoning in rats
Investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital recently developed a phototherapy strategy that was highly effective for removing carbon monoxide in rats. (2019-10-10)

WVU-led study reveals uptick in suicide and fatal drug overdoses among blacks, Hispanics, women
New research from Ian Rockett, professor emeritus of the WVU School of Public Health, shows that suicides among blacks, Hispanics and women are underreported. (2019-10-08)

OTC medications commonly used in cases of attempted suicide by self-poisoning in youth
A new study from Nationwide Children's Hospital and the Central Ohio Poison Center found rates of suicide attempts by self-poisoning among youth and adolescents are higher in rural communities, higher during the academic school year and involve common medications found in many households. (2019-10-07)

Codeine misuse in Australia reduced by prescription-only changes
The move to prescription-only codeine in Australia has seen a 50 percent reduction in the monthly rate of codeine-related poisoning calls and halved codeine sales, finds new research led by the University of Sydney. (2019-10-02)

Measuring ethanol's deadly twin
ETH Zurich researchers have developed an inexpensive, handheld measuring device that can distinguish between methanol and potable alcohol. It offers a simple, quick method of detecting adulterated or contaminated alcoholic beverages and is able to diagnose methanol poisoning in exhaled breath. (2019-09-16)

Adaptation to life in cattle may be driving E. coli to develop harmful features
Research led by Kyushu University finds that E. coli from cattle share widespread genetic similarities with those that cause food poisoning in humans, indicating that the traits that are harmful to humans may emerge to improve survival in the bovine intestine. (2019-08-22)

Poisonous grasses: new study provides reassurance
Stories of mass poisoning incidents of livestock due to toxic grasses made headlines especially overseas. Animal ecologists from Würzburg have studied whether this hazard is also lurking on German pastures. (2019-07-31)

Many grandparents' medicines not secure enough around grandchildren, poll suggests
Whether it's a rare treat or a weekly routine, many older adults enjoy spending time with grandchildren. But a new poll suggests many could do more to reduce the risk of their medications harming their grandchild. More than 80% of the grandparents polled say they keep their medication in the same place as usual when their grandchildren visit their house -- and 72% keep them in their purse or bag when they visit their grandchildren. (2019-07-01)

The case of the poisoned songbirds
Researchers from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife's Wildlife Investigations Laboratory present their results from a toxicological investigation into a mortality event involving songbirds in a new publication in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. (2019-06-26)

Suicide, accidents, and hepatitis: The leading causes of death for Veterans in their first year of PTSD treatment
According to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier, United States Veterans seeking treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are at increased risk of death compared with the general population. Veterans with PTSD are twice as likely to die from suicide, accidental injury, and viral hepatitis than the general population. Veterans with PTSD are also more likely to die from diabetes and chronic liver disease than the general population. (2019-06-24)

Researchers create 'force field' for super materials
Researchers have developed a revolutionary method to intricately grow and protect some of the world's most exciting nanomaterials -- graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNT). (2019-05-09)

Study identifies better, cheaper ways to stem arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh
An analysis compares four methods of dealing with arsenic contamination in Bangladesh, and pinpoints strategies to deliver cleaner water to the greatest number of people at the lowest cost. (2019-05-07)

Suicide attempts by self-poisoning have more than doubled in teens, young adults
A new study from Nationwide Children's Hospital and the Central Ohio Poison Center found rates of suicide attempts by self-poisoning among adolescents have more than doubled in the last decade in the US, and more than tripled for girls and young women. (2019-05-01)

Major findings help understand bacteria's 'superglue'
Molecular details on how harmful bacteria attach to the human body have been revealed for the first time by researchers from the La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science (LIMS). This new knowledge could have huge impacts in anti-microbial development. (2019-04-29)

Drug overdoses in young people on the rise
In American adolescents and young adults, death rates from drug poisoning, particularly from opioids, have sharply increased over the last 10 years, according to new research in the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs. (2019-04-25)

Detecting cyanide exposure
Cyanide exposure can happen occupationally or in low levels from inhaling cigarette smoke -- or from being poisoned by someone out to get you. The effects are fast and can be deadly. But because cyanide is metabolized quickly, it can be difficult to detect in time for an antidote to be administered. Now, in an animal study in ACS' Chemical Research in Toxicology, researchers report a new precise and accurate biomarker of cyanide exposure. (2019-02-27)

Steep rise in self-poisonings in children and adolescents
Self-harm from self-poisoning in children and adolescents is not only increasing but starting at a younger age, finds new research by University of Sydney and the NSW Poisons Information Centre. The study found there were more than 33,500 self-poisonings in young people in Australia from 2006 - 2016, with a 98 per cent increase over this time. (2019-02-20)

Button cell batteries: Swallowing can lead to severe health damage in small children
If button cells are swallowed, they can get stuck in the esophagus and severely damage the mucosa. The Assessment of Intoxications committee of the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) therefore recommends particular care. In the last 10 years, several hundreds of cases involving the swallowing of button cell batteries have been reported to the BfR by hospitals and poison information centers. The health damage is caused above all by the discharge current of the batteries. (2019-02-11)

The 'Batman' in hydrogen fuel cells
In a study published in Nature on Jan. 31, researchers at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) report advances in the development of hydrogen fuel cells that could increase its application in vehicles, especially in extreme temperatures like cold winters. (2019-01-30)

Viral production is not essential for deaths caused by food-borne pathogen
The replication of a bacterial virus is not necessary to cause lethal disease in mice infected with a food-borne pathogen called Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), according to a study published Jan. 10, 2019, in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by John Leong and Marcia Osburne of Tufts University School of Medicine, and colleagues. The surprising findings could lead to the development of novel strategies for the treatment of EHEC and life-threatening kidney-related complications in children. (2019-01-10)

Safer mining practices reduce hazardous exposures in small-scale mining in Nigeria
Doctors Without Borders and Occupational Knowledge International are reporting on a successful pilot project demonstrating significant gains in reducing severe lead poisoning in mining communities in Nigeria. Since 2010 MSF has been treating thousands of poisoned children in response to the world's worst lead poisoning outbreak in Northern Nigeria. The introduction of safer mining practices reduced airborne lead concentrations by 95 percent according to the findings published in Annals of Work Exposures and Health. (2019-01-08)

Scavenging molecule provides long-term protection against nerve agents in rodents
For the first time, scientists have created a scavenging molecule that provides long-lasting preventative protection against toxic nerve agents in rodents. (2019-01-02)

Pathogen predicament: How bacteria propel themselves out of a tight spot
Scientists have deciphered how some types of 'swimming' bacteria have evolved to be able to escape when trapped in small spaces. The discovery could pave the way to finding new methods to stop the spread of certain bacteria, including species that cause food poisoning and stomach ulcers. (2018-12-18)

Mass spectrometry sheds new light on thallium poisoning cold case
In 1994, Chinese university student Zhu Ling began experiencing stomach pain, hair loss and partial paralysis. By the time doctors diagnosed Ling with thallium poisoning about four months later, she was in a coma. Two decades after the poisoning, Richard Ash--an associate research scientist in the University of Maryland's Department of Geology--used mass spectrometry to analyze several of Ling's hairs collected in 1994 and 1995 and established a timeline of her poisoning. (2018-12-13)

'Unfinished agenda' in preventing lead poisoning
Over the years, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and its partners have made major progress towards reducing lead exposure in the United States. But more work remains in preventing lead poisoning in US children and adults, according to a special supplement to the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.  (2018-12-04)

High lead levels found in some spices purchased abroad
Investigations of lead poisoning cases in New York City (NYC) have found high levels of lead in certain spices purchased abroad, reports a study in the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice, part of a special supplement devoted to Lead Poisoning Prevention. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2018-12-04)

Researchers discover potential antidote to botulism
Researchers have identified a compound that strongly inhibits botulinum neurotoxin, the most toxic compound known. That inhibiting compound, nitrophenyl psoralen (NPP), could be used as a treatment to reduce paralysis induced by botulism. Botulinum neurotoxin is considered a potential bioweapon because there is no FDA-approved antidote. The research is published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (2018-11-02)

First evidence of fatal infection of white-tailed sea eagles with avian influenza
The most common unnatural causes of death in white-tailed sea eagles are lead poisoning and collisions with trains. During the winter of 2016/2017, however, many white-tailed eagles died in Northern Germany in circumstances unrelated to either cause. Instead, at least 17 white-tailed sea eagles were killed by avian influenza of the highly pathogenic virus subtype H5N8. Avian influenza may become a new threat for this highly protected wild species. The study was published in the scientific journal Viruses. (2018-10-04)

Scientists discover genetic basis for how harmful algae blooms become toxic
Scientists have uncovered the genetic basis for the production of domoic acid, a potent neurotoxin produced by certain harmful algae blooms. (2018-09-28)

Predictable, preventable and deadly: Carbon monoxide poisonings after storms
Severe weather events, such as summer hurricanes, tornadoes, and winter snow storms often result in widespread and prolonged power outages, interrupting essential household functions, including home heating. An emergency medicine physician addresses the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning associated with furnaces and generators used in such conditions. (2018-09-26)

Folding poisons
Researchers show how toxins of the bacterium Clostridium difficile get into cells in the gut. (2018-09-11)

Strands of hair from member of Franklin expedition provide new clues into mystery
A new analysis of human hair taken from the remains of one of the members of the Franklin expedition, is providing further evidence that lead poisoning was just one of many different factors contributing to the deaths of the crew, and not the primary cause, casting new doubt on the theory that has been the subject of debate amongst scientists and historians for decades. (2018-09-05)

Superbug discovery renews hope for antibiotic treatment
Bacteria that were thought to be resistant to a powerful antibiotic may be susceptible to treatment after all, research from the University of Edinburgh has found. (2018-09-04)

Are vulnerable lions eating endangered zebras?
Are Laikipia's recovering lions turning to endangered Grevy's zebras (Equus grevyi) for their next meal? (2018-08-31)

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