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Current Polar Research News and Events, Polar Research News Articles.
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Good news: European sea bass absorb virtually no microplastic in their muscle tissue
Laboratory study: AWI researchers gave young European see bass feed laced with microplastic for months, but found virtually no microplastic particles in the fish fillets. (2020-07-20)

Hammer-on technique for atomic vibrations in a crystal
Vibrations of atoms in a crystal of the semiconductor gallium arsenide (GaAs) are impulsively shifted to a higher frequency by an optically excited electric current. The related change in the spatial distribution of charge between gallium and arsenic atoms acts back on their motions via electric interactions. (2020-07-14)

NASA's TESS delivers new insights into an ultrahot world
KELT-9 b is one of the hottest planets known. New measurements from NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) have enabled astronomers to greatly improve their understanding of this bizarre world. (2020-06-30)

New compounds from starfish of Kuril basin show efficacy against cancer cells.
Russian scientists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), G. B. Elyakov Pacific Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (PIBOC FEB RAS), and A.V. Zhirmunsky National Scientific Center for Marine Biology (NSCMB FEB RAS) have discovered four new steroid substances which target cells of human breast cancer, and colorectal carcinoma. They were extracted from the starfish Ceramaster patagonicus, a Kuril basin seabed dweller. A related article appears in Marine Drugs. (2020-06-26)

Sledge dogs are closely related to 9,500-year-old 'ancient dog'
Sledge dogs are much older and have adapted to Arctic conditions much earlier than previously thought. In a new study from the QIMMEQ project, researchers from the University of Copenhagen show that ancestors of modern sledge dogs have worked and lived with humans for over 9,500 years. (2020-06-25)

Antarctic penguins happier with less sea ice
Researchers have been surprised to find that Adélie penguins in Antarctica prefer reduced sea-ice conditions, not just a little bit, but a lot. As climate models project rapid reduction of the continent's sea ice over the rest of the century, this iconic polar predator could be a rare global warming winner. Their research findings are published on June 24, 2020 in Science Advances. (2020-06-24)

Satellites have drastically changed how we forecast hurricanes
The powerful hurricane that struck Galveston, Texas on September 8, 1900, killing an estimated 8,000 people and destroying more than 3,600 buildings, took the coastal city by surprise. (2020-06-22)

After a century of searching, scientists find new liquid phase
Researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder's Soft Materials Research Center (SMRC) have discovered an elusive phase of matter, first proposed more than 100 years ago and sought after ever since. (2020-06-10)

A tiny arctic shrub reveals secrets of plant growth on Svalbard
It's not easy being a tiny willow on the wind-and snow-blasted islands of the Norwegian territory of Svalbard. It turns out that Salix polaris, the polar willow, handles these tough conditions by growing as best it can in response to July temperatures -- a response that researchers recorded all over the archipelago. (2020-06-05)

Breaking the mold: An unusual choice of material yields incredibly long-lasting batteries
Scientists from the Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Korea, develop a novel silica-based cathode for lithium-sulfur batteries, thereby enabling the realization of batteries that can last for over 2000 charge/discharge cycles. The possibility of successfully using the unconventional silica could spark a paradigm shift in rechargeable battery designs. (2020-06-03)

Philippine volcanic eruption could prompt El Niño warming next winter
Climatological models suggest that gases from an erupting Philippine volcano could have significant impact on the global climate if more explosive eruptions occur. (2020-06-02)

Antarctic ice sheets capable of retreating up to 50 meters per day
The ice shelves surrounding the Antarctic coastline retreated at speeds of up to 50 meters per day at the end of the last Ice Age, far more rapid than the satellite-derived retreat rates observed today, new research has found. (2020-05-28)

Designing a flexible material to protect buildings, military personnel
Now, a team of engineers led by Guoliang Huang, a James C. Dowell Professor in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department at the University of Missouri College of Engineering, has designed a flexible material that can help buildings withstand multiple waves of energy traveling through a solid material, including the simultaneous forward and backward and side-to-side motions found in earthquakes. (2020-05-26)

Scientists take first census of Arctic freshwater molluscs in 130 years
Based on previously released data and their own investigations, researchers at the St Petersburg University Laboratory of Macroecology and Biogeography of Invertebrates have assessed the diversity of freshwater molluscs in the Circumpolar region of the World. (2020-05-25)

Clarification of microbial community structures around Antarctic lakes
A research team lead by Toyohashi University of Technology has revealed the community structure of microorganisms living around freshwater lakes, ice-free areas of Antarctica. An analysis of samples collected from lake shores, puddles, etc. using a next-generation sequencer has verified that cyanobacteria and tardigrades are widely distributed and specific eukaryotic algae are dominant in certain sites. This knowledge will contribute to clarification of adaptation mechanisms of microorganisms to severe physical stresses in Antarctica. (2020-05-15)

Data from 2 space lasers comprehensively estimate polar ice loss and sea level rise
Ice sheet losses from Greenland and Antarctica have outpaced snow accumulation and contributed approximately 14 millimeters to sea level rise over 16 years (2003 to 2019), a new analysis of data from NASA's laser-shooting satellites has revealed. (2020-04-30)

Arctic wildlife uses extreme method to save energy
The extreme cold, harsh environment and constant hunt for food means that Arctic animals have become specialists in saving energy. Now, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have discovered a previously unknown energy-saving method used by birds during the polar night. (2020-04-28)

Plastic pollution reaching the Antarctic
Food wrapping, fishing gear and plastic waste continue to reach the Antarctic. Two new studies into how plastic debris is reaching sub-Antarctic islands are published this month (April 2020) in the journal Environment International. (2020-04-28)

Scientists reveal how tuberculosis bacteria import vitamin B12 to grow
Researchers from Russia, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the US have revealed the structure of the protein responsible for vitamin B12 import into the cells of the bacterium that causes tuberculosis. (2020-04-22)

Arctic research expedition likely faces extreme conditions in fast-changing Arctic
Scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) have simulated conditions along potential routes for the MOSAiC polar expedition, using today's conditions in the 'new Arctic.' The results suggest that thinner sea ice may carry the ship farther than would be expected compared to historical conditions and the sea ice around the ship may melt earlier than the 12-month goal. (2020-04-20)

NASA reports Arctic stratospheric ozone depletion hit record low in March
Ozone levels above the Arctic reached a record low for March, NASA researchers report. An analysis of satellite observations show that ozone levels reached their lowest point on March 12 at 205 Dobson units. While such low levels are rare, they are not unprecedented. Similar low ozone levels occurred in the upper atmosphere, or stratosphere, in 1997 and 2011. In comparison, the lowest March ozone value observed in the Arctic is usually around 240 Dobson units. (2020-04-16)

Lipid gradient that keeps your eyes wet
New understandings of how lipids function within tears could lead to better drugs for treating dry eye disease. (2020-04-07)

Tracking Southern Hemisphere black carbon to Antarctic snow
Biomass burning represents around 80% of all BC emitted to the atmosphere in the Southern Hemisphere, which means that the fires happening in Australia, New Zealand and South America ultimately leave a mark in Antarctic snow. (2020-04-07)

Artificial light in the arctic
A new study examine how artificial light during the polar night disrupts Arctic fish and zooplankton behavior down to 200 meters in depth, which could affect fish counts. (2020-04-06)

Traces of ancient rainforest in Antarctica point to a warmer prehistoric world
Researchers have found evidence of rainforests near the South Pole 90 million years ago, suggesting the climate was exceptionally warm at the time. (2020-04-01)

New discovery: Evidence for a 90-million-year-old rainforest near the South Pole
Researchers have found unexpected fossil traces of a temperate rainforest near the South Pole 90 million years ago, suggesting the continent had an exceptionally warm climate in prehistoric times. (2020-04-01)

Modern science reveals ancient secret in Japanese literature
Nearly a millennium and a half ago, red light streaked the night sky over Japan. Witnesses compared it to the tail of a pheasant -- it appeared as a fan of beautiful red feathers stretched across the sky. Since the event, scientists have studied the witness accounts written in the year 620 A.D. and speculated about what the cosmic phenomenon could have actually been. Now, researchers from The Graduate University for Advanced Studies may have found the answer. (2020-03-28)

How stable is deep ocean circulation in warmer climate?
If circulation of deep waters in the Atlantic stops or slows due to climate change, it could cause cooling in northern North America and Europe - a scenario that has occurred during past cold glacial periods. Now, a Rutgers coauthored study suggests that short-term disruptions of deep ocean circulation occurred during warm interglacial periods in the last 450,000 years, and may happen again. (2020-03-26)

Challenge and desire in Antarctic meteorology and climate
The outcomes of the 13th and 14th Workshop on Antarctic Meteorology and Climate (WAMC), as well as the 3rd and 4th Year of Polar Prediction (YOPP) Meetings, was discussed in an article published in the peer-reviewed journal Advances in Atmospheric Sciences. (2020-03-23)

Arctic light pollution affects fish, zooplankton up to 200 metres deep
If artificial light shines into the Arctic Ocean during the polar night, does it matter? A new paper in Communications Biology says the answer to this is a strong yes. (2020-03-23)

Greenland shed ice at unprecedented rate in 2019; Antarctica continues to lose mass
In a new study in the AGU journal Geophysical Research Letters, scientists from the University of California, Irvine and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory describe Greenland's loss of 600 billion tons of ice in the summer of 2019, raising global sea levels by 2.2 millimeters in a short time. (2020-03-18)

New research first to relate Antarctic sea ice melt to weather change in tropics
While there is a growing body of research showing how the loss of Arctic sea ice affects other parts of the planet, a new study is the first to also consider the long-range effect of Antarctic sea ice melt. It estimates that Arctic and Antarctic ice loss will account for about one-fifth of the warming that is projected to happen in the tropics. (2020-03-16)

Shrinking sea ice is creating an ecological trap for polar bears
The decision of each individual bear to stay on the ice or to move to land appears to be linked to the energetic cost or benefit of either option, and the potential of having to swim to reach land. (2020-02-25)

Polar bears in Baffin Bay skinnier, having fewer cubs due to less sea ice
Satellite tracking of adult females and visual monitoring of polar bears in Baffin Bay show changes from the 1990s to the period from 2009 to 2015. Bears in Baffin Bay are getting thinner and adult females are having fewer cubs than when sea ice was more available. (2020-02-12)

The first potentially invasive species to reach the Antarctica on drifting marine algae
Drifting algae in the Austral Ocean can bring invasive species to the Antarctic coasts, according to a study published in the journal Scientific Reports. The new study describes the first scientific evidence of a potentially invasive and colonial species -the marine bryozoan Membranipora membranacea- which reaches the Antarctic latitude islands in macroalgae that drift in the marine environment. (2020-01-31)

Fossil foraminifer in marine sediment reveals sea surface water temperature 800,000 years ago
Japanese researchers found that the sea surface water temperature in the northwestern Pacific fluctuated drastically from approximately 800,000 to 750,000 years ago, based on oxygen isotope analyses for fossil foraminifers from an uplifted marine succession in the Chiba composite section on Honshu Island, Japan. A comparison with the results obtained from deep-sea sediment cores suggests that the marine environmental change near the section, which was once deep-sea sediment, could be associated with the discharges of ice meltwater into the North Atlantic. (2020-01-30)

Plane travel destroys polar bear habitat
A group of polar bear researchers wants you to do more than worry about the fate of these beautiful animals. They've calculated how much summer sea ice is melted per metric ton of CO2 emissions. Then you can decide if the flight you're planning to take is worth destroying polar bear habitat. (2020-01-23)

Predicting non-native invasions in Antarctica
A new study identifies the non-native species most likely to invade the Antarctic Peninsula region over the next decade. It provides a baseline for all operators in the region to look at mitigation measures. The study is published in the journal Global Change Biology. (2020-01-13)

Sensing protein wellbeing
The folding state of the proteins in live cells often reflect the cell's general health. Australian scientists have developed a molecular probe that senses the state of the proteome -- the entire set of the proteins -- by measuring the polarity of the protein environment. The fluorescence signal of the probe quantifies unfolding and its chameleon-like color shift maps the cellular regions of enhanced misfolding, says the study published in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (2020-01-09)

Martian water vapor varies with the seasons
The potential for Mars' water to be lost into space is greater during the planet's warm and stormy seasons, according to a new study. (2020-01-09)

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