Current Polarization News and Events

Current Polarization News and Events, Polarization News Articles.
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Politics and the brain: Attention perks up when politicians break with party lines
Building upon previous work studying the brain and politics, Ingrid Haas, associate professor of political science affiliated with Nebraska's Center for Brain, Biology and Behavior, examined the insula and anterior cingular cortex in 58 individuals using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and learned that the human brain processes politically incongruent statements differently. (2021-02-22)

Low-loss single-mode hybrid-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fiber
Inhibited-coupling hollow-core photonic-crystal fibers (IC-HCPCF) are proving to be serious candidates for next-generation optical fiber. However, the difficulty in simultaneously attaining ultra-low loss, single-mode, polarization-maintaining hinders this prospect. In recent publication, Fetah Benabid and co-workers developed a novel IC-HCPCF. The fiber is based on hybrid Kagome-tubular cladding, and its performance opens up a new route for the development of HCPCFs combining robust ultra-low-loss and single-mode laser beam transportation. (2021-02-21)

The CLASP2 space experiment achieves an unprecedented map of the Sun's magnetic field
Every day space telescopes provide spectacular images of the solar activity. However, their instruments are blind to its main driver: the magnetic field in the outer layers of the solar atmosphere, where the explosive events that occasionally affect the Earth occur. (2021-02-19)

Engineers place molecule-scale devices in precise orientation
A technique for controlling the orientation of manufactured DNA shapes now removes one of the last barriers for the combination of molecular devices with conventional semiconductor chips. (2021-02-18)

Spin hall effect of light with near 100% efficiency
POSTECH-KAIST joint research team develops perfect SHEL using anisotropic metasurfaces. (2021-02-18)

Researchers find broad impacts from political polarization
Ultimately, polarization harms mental and physical health, financial welfare, relationships and societal interests through its impact on psychology, marketing and public policy outcomes. (2021-02-10)

A new hands-off probe uses light to explore electron behavior in a topological insulator
Topological insulators are one of the most puzzling quantum materials. Their edges are electron superhighways where electrons flow with no loss, while the bulk of the material blocks electron flow - properties that could be useful in quantum computing and information processing. Researchers at SLAC and Stanford used a process called high harmonic generation to separately probe electron behavior in both of those domains. The method should be applicable to a broad range of quantum materials. (2021-02-02)

The morphological characteristics of precipitation areas affects precipitation intensity
Researchers from USTC studied the morphological characteristics of precipitation areas over Tibetan Plateau and found that morphological characteristics of precipitation areas affects precipitation intensity. (2021-02-02)

Photonics research makes smaller, more efficient VR, augmented reality tech possible
Engineering researchers have developed and demonstrated a new approach for designing photonic devices. The advance allows them to control the direction and polarization of light from thin-film LEDs, paving the way for a new generation of virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) technologies. (2021-02-01)

Coiling them up: Synthesizing organic molecules with a long helical structure
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology produced and extensively characterized novel organic molecules with a long helical structure. Unlike previous helical molecules, these longer compounds exhibit special interactions between coils that could give rise to interesting optical and chemical properties with applications in light polarization, catalysis, and molecular springs. (2021-01-29)

Cell 'bones' mystery solved with supercomputers
Supercomputer simulations allocated by XSEDE on TACC's Stampede2 have helped solve the mystery of how actin filaments polymerize. University of Chicago and Yale researchers employed all-atom molecular dynamics to show structural basis for polymerization kinetics at polarized ends of actin filaments. This fundamental research could be applied to treatments to stop cancer spread, develop self-healing materials, and more. (2021-01-26)

Microstructured optical fibers find their 3D-printed groove
Advanced laser-printing techniques prove ideal for creating tiny optical communication devices with complex internal structures. (2021-01-25)

Researchers make domestic high-performance bipolar membranes possible
A team led by Prof. XU Tongwen and Prof WU Liang from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) adopted an in-situ growth idea to construct a stable and efficient membrane (2021-01-21)

A display that completely blocks off counterfeits
POSTECH research team led by Professor Junsuk Rho develops nanostructures capable of polarized optical encryption. (2021-01-21)

Bringing atoms to a standstill: NIST miniaturizes laser cooling
Scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have miniaturized the optical components required to cool atoms down to a few thousandths of a degree above absolute zero, the first step in employing them on microchips to drive a new generation of super-accurate atomic clocks, enable navigation without GPS, and simulate quantum systems. (2021-01-21)

Alcohols exhibit quantum effects
Skoltech scientists and their colleagues from the Russian Quantum Center revealed a significant role of nuclear quantum effects in the polarization of alcohol in an external electric field. The new research provides insight into the properties of liquid dielectrics. The core assumption of the model pertains to a novel understanding of dielectric polarization phenomena in polar liquids by means of nuclear quantum effects. (2021-01-19)

2D compound shows unique versatility
A unique two-dimensional material shows distinct properties on each side, depending on polarization by an external electric field. The pairing of antimony and indium selenide could have applications in solar energy and quantum computing. (2021-01-11)

A polarization-driven guide to making high-performance, versatile solar cells
When solar cells are exposed to sunlight, certain bound ''charge pairs'' are generated in its components, which need to be separated for photocurrent generation. Ferroelectric materials, due to their spontaneous electric polarization, are highly efficient at charge separation but do poorly in light-to-electricity conversion. Now, scientists from Korea have demonstrated using theoretical calculations that antiperovskite oxides, a class of ferroelectric materials, show large absorption of sunlight, making them suitable photoabsorbers for thin film solar cells. (2021-01-04)

Order and disorder in crystalline ice explained
Unlike most other materials, ice at very low temperature is not as ordered as it could be. A new study explains the reasons why this happens and how some of the missing order can be recovered. The scientists have described a relatively obscure and yet fundamental property of very low temperature ice, ferroelectricity. The results, published in PNAS, are likely to extend to ice surfaces and thus be relevant to the agglomeration of ice particles in interstellar space. (2020-12-29)

Bio-inspired endoscope provides 3D visible and near-infrared images simultaneously
Researchers have developed a new bio-inspired medical endoscope that can acquire 3D visible light and near-infrared fluorescence images at the same time. It features an optical design that combines the high-resolution 3D imaging of human vision with the mantis shrimp's capability to simultaneously detect multiple wavelengths of light. (2020-12-22)

Ecosystem dynamics: Topological phases in biological systems
Physicists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have shown that topological phases could exist in biology, and in so doing they have identified a link between solid-state physics and biophysics. (2020-12-21)

New discovery brings analogue spintronic devices closer
The observation of nonlinearity in electron spin-related processes in graphene makes it easier to transport, manipulate and detect spins, as well as spin-to-charge conversion. It also allows analogue operations such as amplitude modulation and spin amplification. This brings spintronics to the point where regular electronics was after the introduction of the first transistors. These results by University of Groningen physicists were published in the journal Physical Review Applied on 17 December. (2020-12-18)

Extreme political advertising can hurt campaign efforts
Aggressive political messaging can work against candidates by radicalizing supporters and alienating moderates, according to a Dartmouth study. (2020-12-15)

Explained: Political polarization
Polarization - which divides the population into belligerent groups with rigidly opposed beliefs and identities - has a steely grip on the United States, and a University of Houston researcher reports that economic inequality is to blame. (2020-12-14)

Polarization increases with economic decline, becoming cripplingly contagious
Polarization tends to soar in times of economic duress and rising inequality. Yet, even after financial conditions improve, these divisions may remain deeply rooted, according to a new model debuted in Science Advances. (2020-12-11)

Faster and more efficient information transfer
Physicists use antiferromagnetic rust to carry information over long distances at room temperature (2020-12-10)

A hint of new physics in polarized radiation from the early universe
Yuto Minami at KEK and Eiichiro Komatsu at Kavli IPMU developed a new method to calibrate detectors to the light from dust in our Galaxy, thereby describing a new physics, with 99.2 percent accuracy, that may show parity symmetry breaking. (2020-12-02)

Natural three-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystal
Nonlinear photonic crystals are playing a prominent role in laser and nonlinear optics. Here, Scientists in China presented a natural potassium-tantalate-niobate (KTN) nonlinear photonic crystal with 3D Rubik's domain structures. The composite rotated domains could be useful for different phase-matching conditions with rich reciprocal vectors along arbitrary direction. KTN crystal breaks strict requirements for incident light and crystal direction in nonlinear optics and trigger newfangled optoelectronic applications for perovskite ferroelectrics. (2020-12-02)

Super-resolution "street view" microscopy hits the SPOT
An advanced technique called SPOT is giving researchers a opportunities to study the sophisticated world of lipid dynamics within cells. (2020-11-18)

Highly sensitive detection of circularly polarized light without a filter
Japanese scientists developed a photodiode using a crystalline film composed of lead perovskite compounds with organic chiral molecules to detect circularly polarized light without a filter. It is expected as a technology for visualization of the invisible change of object surfaces such as stress intensity and distribution. (2020-11-16)

Boosted signal
First introduced into wide use in the middle of the 20th century, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has since become an indispensable technique for examining materials down to their atoms, revealing molecular structure and other details without interfering with the material itself. (2020-11-16)

Ultracompact metalens microscopy breaks FOV constraints
As reported in Advanced Photonics, their metalens-integrated imaging device (MIID) exhibits an ultracompact architecture with a working imaging distance in the hundreds of micrometers. Using a simple image-stitching process, they are able to obtain wide-field microscope imaging with large FOV and high resolution. (2020-11-13)

Identifying the microscopic mechanism of vibrational energy harvesters
The Japanese research team elucidated the microscopic mechanism in which amorphous silica becomes negatively charged as a vibrational energy harvester, which is anticipated to achieve self-power generation without charging, as it is needed for IoT that is garnering attention in recent years with its 'trillion sensors' that create a large-scale network of sensors. Unlike wind power and solar power generation, vibrational power generation, which utilizes natural vibration for power generation, is not affected by weather. (2020-11-11)

Anti-hacking based on the circular polarization direction of light
The Internet of Things (IoT) allowing smart phones, home appliances, drones and self-driving vehicles to exchange digital information in real time requires a powerful security solution, as it can have a direct impact on user safety and assets. A solution for IoT security that has been is a physical unclonable function (PUF) that can supplement software-based key security vulnerable to various attack or physical attack. (2020-11-06)

Germanium telluride's hidden properties at the nanoscale revealed
Germanium Telluride is an interesting candidate material for spintronic devices. In a comprehensive study at BESSY II, a Helmholtz-RSF Joint Research Group has now revealed how the spin texture switches by ferroelectric polarization within individual nanodomains. (2020-11-06)

Investigating optical activity under an external magnetic field
A new study published in EPJ B by Chengping Yin, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Quantum Engineering and Quantum Materials, South China, aims to derive an analytical model of optical activity in black phosphorous under an external magnetic field. (2020-11-06)

Astronomers discover clues that unveil the mystery of fast radio bursts
UNLV astrophysicist Bing Zhang and international collaborators recently observed fast radio bursts, powerful radio waves coming from deep space that have been among the most mysterious astronomical phenomena ever observed. Zhang and colleagues contribute to our understanding of where they come from and how they're produced in a series of papers published in Nature. (2020-11-05)

FAST reveals mystery of fast radio bursts from the universe
The Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope (FAST) has revealed some mystery of the fast radio bursts, according to a study published in Nature on Oct. 28. (2020-11-04)

Tunable THz radiation from 3D topological insulator
Wu's research group has been investigating a three-dimensional topological insulator of bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) as a promising basis for an effective THz system. They recently systematically investigated THz radiation from Bi2Te3 nanofilms driven by femtosecond laser pulses. (2020-11-02)

Sheer protection from electromagnetic radiation
A printable ink that is both conductive and transparent can also block radio waves. (2020-11-01)

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