Current Politicians News and Events

Current Politicians News and Events, Politicians News Articles.
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Politics and the brain: Attention perks up when politicians break with party lines
Building upon previous work studying the brain and politics, Ingrid Haas, associate professor of political science affiliated with Nebraska's Center for Brain, Biology and Behavior, examined the insula and anterior cingular cortex in 58 individuals using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and learned that the human brain processes politically incongruent statements differently. (2021-02-22)

Women's voices in the media still outnumbered by those of men - study
New research from Simon Fraser University shows that women's voices continue to be underrepresented in the media, despite having prominent female leaders across Canada and internationally. Researchers in SFU's Discourse Processing Lab found that men outnumber women quoted in Canadian news media about three to one. The findings from the team's Gender Gap Tracker study were published this week in the journal PLOS ONE. (2021-02-05)

Politicians must be held to account for mishandling the pandemic
Politicians around the world must be held to account for mishandling the covid-19 pandemic, argues a senior editor at The BMJ today. (2021-02-03)

Majority skeptical healthcare costs will fall anytime soon as Biden begins presidency
In his inaugural address, President Biden vowed that 'help is on the way' to a nation grappling with a pandemic that has already claimed over 420,000 lives and counting. However, despite the promise of a better future, a new survey from West Health and Gallup finds Americans remain largely skeptical that issues as varied as managing the COVID-19 crisis, lowering healthcare costs, improving the economy, fixing immigration and addressing climate change, will improve anytime soon. (2021-01-28)

Young people feel let down by politicians and media stereotypes, says new research
An international study titled: To Lockdown and back: young people's lived experience of the COVID-19 pandemic says young people's perspectives on COVID-19 recovery is being overshadowed by negative 'victim or villain' narratives. (2020-11-30)

The first battle for oil in Norway
The world's richest man and the world's largest oil company dominated the petroleum market in Norway long before landmark finds on the Norwegian continental shelf and the Norwegian oil fund. (2020-11-19)

Politicians and governments are suppressing science, argues The BMJ
Politicians and governments are suppressing science, and when good science is suppressed, people die, argues a senior editor at The BMJ today. (2020-11-13)

Study: Republicans and Democrats hate the other side more than they love their own side
In the study, titled 'Political sectarianism in America,' the authors provide a broad survey of current scientific literature to interpret the current state of politics, and introduce the construct of 'political sectarianism''' to describe the bitter polarization between the Republican and Democratic parties in the US that has been on the rise since the 1990s. (2020-10-29)

Facing up to the reality of politicians' Instagram posts
A University of Georgia researcher used computer vision to analyze thousands of images from over 100 Instagram accounts of United States politicians and discovered posts that showed politicians' faces in nonpolitical settings increased audience engagement over traditional posts such as politicians in professional or political settings. (2020-10-29)

People with disabilities view health care access as human right, study shows
Analysis of national survey data of Americans with disabilities finds they overwhelmingly view health care access as a human right, but many barriers stand in their way, including insurance tied to employment and policy makers not listening. They also view the ACA positively, even though they span the political spectrum. (2020-10-27)

Voters unlikely to blame politicians for their handling of the pandemic at next election
Politicians are unlikely to be punished or rewarded for their failures or successes in managing the coronavirus pandemic at the next election, suggests an analysis of survey data from the US, the UK and India, published in the online journal BMJ Global Health. (2020-10-22)

Citizens themselves contribute to political mistrust
People have a special ability to detect and disseminate information about egotistic and selfish leaders. In this way, citizens themselves contribute greatly to the proliferation of voter apathy and mistrust of politicians, according to a new study from Aarhus BSS at Aarhus University. (2020-10-20)

The development of climate security discourse in Japan
This research traced discourses related to climate security in Japan to determine why so little exists in Japan and whether or not such discourse could suggest new areas for consideration to more comprehensively respond to the climate change problem. Based on categorization of various approaches by climate security-related literature outside Japan, the study revealed areas where Japan has been able to respond to, and other areas where almost no discussion is being made in Japan. (2020-10-01)

Sensational COVID-19 communication erodes confidence in science
Scientists, policymakers and the media should acknowledge inherent uncertainties in epidemiological models projecting the spread of COVID-19 and avoid ''catastrophizing'' worst-case scenarios, according to new research from Cornell University. (2020-09-29)

Higher narcissism may be linked with more political participation
A politically engaged electorate is key to any thriving democracy, but not everyone participates in elections and other political activities. New Penn State research found that people who are narcissistic may also be more politically active. (2020-09-25)

Criticism of COVID-19 models by democratic political leaders may erode public trust in science
Criticisms of COVID-19 models by Democratic elites in May 2020 appeared to undermine public support for the models' use - and trust in science more broadly -- according to a series of survey experiments conducted with the participation of more than 6,000 Americans. (2020-09-25)

Facebook political ads more partisan, less negative than TV
More political candidates may be shifting primarily to social media to advertise rather than TV, according to a study of advertising trends from the 2018 campaign season. The study also found that Facebook political ads were more partisan, less negative and less issue-focused than those on TV. (2020-09-14)

A change at the top before elections boosts MP turnover across Europe, research shows
Appointing a new leader just before an election leads to a higher turnover of MPs after the poll, a study of political parties across Europe during the past 80 years shows. (2020-09-14)

Awareness raising alone is not enough
Too rarely do nature conservation initiatives or strategies announced by politicians lead to people changing their everyday behaviour. A German-Israeli research team led by the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) has investigated the reasons for this. According to them, the measures do not sufficiently exploit the range of possible behavioural interventions and too rarely specify the target groups, they write in the journal Conservation Biology. (2020-09-01)

When it comes to supporting candidates, ideology trumps race and gender
Voters who express prejudice against minorities and women are still more likely to support candidates who most closely align with their ideologies, regardless of the race or sex of such candidates, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2020-08-24)

Examining Congress members' popularity on Instagram
New research on the popularity of Congress members' Instagram posts reveals some surprising factors at play that could elevate their influence on the platform and make for more effective campaigns. (2020-08-12)

OECD countries' politicians follow each other
The more democratic a country is, the greater the probability that its politicians decide in the same way as in neighbouring countries, without further analysis. This is according a research group that has studied political decision-making during the beginning of the Corona crisis. The results have now been published in the respected journal PNAS. (2020-08-12)

New model shows how voting behavior can drive political parties apart
If voters gravitate toward the center of the political spectrum, why are the parties drifting farther apart? A new model reveals a mechanism for increased polarization in US politics, guided by the idea of 'satisficing'-- that people will settle for a candidate who is 'good enough.' (2020-08-10)

How governments resist World Heritage 'in Danger' listings
Some national governments repeatedly resist the placement of 41 UNESCO World Heritage sites on the World Heritage in Danger list. This resistance is despite the sites being just as threatened, or more threatened, than those already on the in Danger list. (2020-07-20)

Extinction Rebellion's activists more likely to be new to protesting, study shows
Extinction Rebellion supporters are more likely to be new to protesting than other environmental activists, a new study shows. (2020-07-15)

Candidates who use humor on Twitter may find the joke is on them
Political candidates' use of humor on social media could sometimes backfire on them with potential supporters, new research suggests. People were more likely to view messages using humor as inappropriate for a political candidate they didn't know, the study found. That led participants to rate a candidate using humor as less credible than one who didn't -- and less likely to get their vote. (2020-06-15)

New Zealanders' attitudes changed after pandemic lockdown
In the first few weeks of the lockdown of New Zealand in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, residents reported a slight increase in mental distress but higher levels of confidence in the government, science and the police, as well as greater patriotism, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2020-06-04)

Conspiracy beliefs could increase fringe political engagement, shows new study
New research appearing in Social Psychological and Personality Science finds that when studying an average person, conspiracy beliefs lead to more willingness for engagement in 'non-normative' roles, like illegally blocking a public entryway, while avoiding more typical political engagement, such as voting. (2020-02-28)

New discovery about harmful particles: 'A fundamental shortcoming in air pollution models'
Researchers from the University of Copenhagen have discovered a surprising phenomenon in a process by which certain gas molecules produce harmful particles. The impact of this phenomenon is likely to increase in urban areas as pollution decreases. This knowledge can serve to help politicians adopt better measures to combat air pollution and contribute to improve climate models. (2019-12-17)

Growing length of manifestos casts new light on electioneering history
From a modest 150 words to the length of a children's book -- the number of words used by politicians in their election manifestos has grown substantially in the past century, new research shows. (2019-11-21)

Innovative tool analyzes all 22,000 tweets from 2016 Republican presidential candidates
Donald Trump's Twitter activity during the 2016 presidential primaries was largely comprised of tweets about performance, personal attacks and his standing in the polls. Researchers call this type of political messaging a strategy frame. Issue frames, meantime, deal with policy, decision-making, and identifying problems and proposing solutions. Most GOP hopefuls were issue focused. Only Trump and John Kasich, the last 2 Republicans standing prior to the convention, emphasized strategy over issues, according to a new study. (2019-10-31)

House developers could be the secret weapon to improving air quality
House developers and urban planners could be the unlikely heroes in the battle against the 'new tobacco' -- air pollution -- say researchers from the University of Surrey. (2019-10-30)

Foreign leaders generate more emotional response from Dublin voters than Irish politicians on Brexit
Among the 11 elected leaders studied, Irish Foreign Minister Simon Coveney evoked the weakest emotional response from the audience with a 29.5 rating. The Fine Gael senator ranked just below Democratic Unionist Party Leader Arlene Foster from the province of Northern Ireland, who scored 30.1 as indexed by Shimmer Research's biometric scoring system. US President Donald Trump and European Council President Donald Tusk scored the strongest average arousal scores, at 38.5 and 36.4, respectively. (2019-10-17)

Nature-based solutions can help protect us from climate-related natural hazards
Solutions found in nature should be our first line of defense against the increasing number of climate change-related natural disasters, say experts from the University of Surrey. (2019-10-17)

Election 2019: Hope for a national pharmacare plan
The 2019 federal election in Canada brings hope for universal pharmacare if Canadians ensure the elected government delivers on the long-delayed promise of universal access to essential medications, argues an editorial in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-10-15)

FSU research: Fear not a factor in gun ownership
Are gun owners more or less afraid than people who do not own guns? A new study from researchers at Florida State University and the University of Arizona hopes to add some empirical data to the conversation after finding that gun owners tend to report less fear than non-gun owners. (2019-09-25)

Over-sensationalized scandal can actually be a job saver for strong performing leader
A new study from the University of Notre Dame introduces the role of the 'severity gap,' showing that when media or public perceptions of a scandal outpace its actual severity, strong-performing leaders are more likely to keep their jobs. (2019-08-07)

The geoengineering of consent: How conspiracists dominate YouTube climate science content
Using YouTube to learn about climate-change-related topics will expose you to video content that mostly opposes worldwide scientific consensus. That's the finding of a new study, which also reveals that conspiracy theorists have 'hijacked' some scientific terms, such as 'geoengineering,' so that searches provide entirely non-scientific content. Scientists could counteract this by forming alliances with influential YouTubers, politicians and those in popular culture, to ensure scientifically accurate video content reaches the widest-possible audience. (2019-07-25)

Over-claiming knowledge predicts anti-establishment voting
People who think they know more than they actually do are more likely to vote against the establishment, shows new research out of the Netherlands. (2019-07-18)

Private prisons have a political role in corrections issues in the US, researcher finds
Private prisons play a political role in immigration and incarceration issues in the United States and the industry may face obstacles as well as opportunities in the current political landscape, a new paper from an Oregon State University researcher suggests. (2019-06-25)

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