Current Politics News and Events

Current Politics News and Events, Politics News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 21 | 832 Results
Disagreeing takes up a lot of brain real estate
In a new study Yale scientists looked into the brains of individuals engaged in conversation. What they observed varied significantly depending on whether or not the participants were in agreement. (2021-01-13)

Changes in political administration come with increased danger of international conflict
A new paper including faculty at Binghamton University suggests that when democratic publics vote out an administration, this change comes with an increase in the danger of undesirable conflict. (2021-01-13)

Delivering the news with humor makes young adults more likely to remember and share
Could the merging of humor and news actually help inform the public? New research from the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania and the School of Communication at Ohio State University found that young people were more likely to remember information about politics and government policy when it was conveyed in a humorous rather than non-humorous manner. They were also more willing to share the information online. (2021-01-07)

Traditional stereotypes about masculinity may help explain support for Trump
American politicians have long been expected to uphold a certain veneer: powerful, influential and never vulnerable. New Penn State research has found that these idealized forms of masculinity may also help explain support for Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election and in the days leading up to the 2020 election. (2021-01-04)

USC study: Young adults who identify as Republicans eschew COVID safety precautions
Young Californians who identify themselves as Republicans are less likely to follow social distancing guidelines that prevent coronavirus transmission than those who identify as Democrats or Independents, according to new USC study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. (2020-12-14)

Polarization increases with economic decline, becoming cripplingly contagious
Polarization tends to soar in times of economic duress and rising inequality. Yet, even after financial conditions improve, these divisions may remain deeply rooted, according to a new model debuted in Science Advances. (2020-12-11)

Bullied lesbian, gay and bisexual students more likely to carry weapons
A new study has found youth who report carrying a weapon have higher odds of experiencing bullying and bullying-related victimization. Minoritized student populations, especially sexual minority youth disproportionately experience bullying and bullying victimization. (2020-12-08)

Dogmatic people seek less information even when uncertain
People who are dogmatic about their views seek less information and make less accurate judgements as a result, even on simple matters unrelated to politics, according to a study led by UCL and Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics researchers. (2020-11-20)

Men feel less powerful in their private lives
Men perceive themselves as having less power in their private than in their public lives, a new study from Lund University has suggested. Furthermore, both men and women agree: power in your private life matters more than that in public life. (2020-11-12)

Explaining the religious vote for Trump
New research by Louisiana State University sociologists indicate it wasn't Christian nationalism that drove churchgoers' Trump vote in 2016. Rather, surprisingly, Christian nationalism was important among non-churchgoers. (2020-11-10)

Fashion's underappreciated role in presidential politics
New research reveals style plays an underappreciated role in presidential politics and has meaningful consequences for presidential power. (2020-11-02)

'Lazy use' of term populist has helped to legitimize far-right politics
New analysis from academics at the University of Bath into the media's use of the term 'populism' highlights how its overuse has clouded important debates about nationalism, racism, and xenophobia. (2020-10-29)

Study: Republicans and Democrats hate the other side more than they love their own side
In the study, titled 'Political sectarianism in America,' the authors provide a broad survey of current scientific literature to interpret the current state of politics, and introduce the construct of 'political sectarianism''' to describe the bitter polarization between the Republican and Democratic parties in the US that has been on the rise since the 1990s. (2020-10-29)

Former rebel groups become more moderate after gaining political power in nations with democracy, research shows
Former rebel groups who transform into political parties have adopted a moderate stance after gaining power in more democratic political systems, a study shows. (2020-10-26)

From sea to shining sea: new survey reveals state-level opinions on climate change
A new report analyzing state-level opinions on climate change finds the majority of Americans believe in and want action on climate change--but factors like state politics and local climate play important roles. (2020-10-26)

Why do white Americans support both strict immigration policies and dream act?
White Americans support strict immigration policies while at the same time favor the DREAM Act that would grant legal status to some immigrants who were brought to the United States as children, a contradiction linked to racial resentment and the belief that equality already exists, according to a Rutgers-led study. (2020-10-22)

Democracy: Millennials are the most disillusioned generation 'in living memory' - global study
Globally, millennials are most dissatisfied with democracy, and more so than previous generations were when under 35. Major Cambridge report analysed data from close to 5 million people from 160 nations across almost half a century. Researchers find millennials are most satisfied with democracy under populist leaders, the sole exception being the Trump presidency. Millennials in developed democracies are more likely to judge political opponents as 'morally flawed' than older voters. (2020-10-19)

Justice for all: How race and American identity may affect politics
New Penn State research examined whether feeling like you belong in America -- or not -- affected how members of different races and ethnicities participated in politics. (2020-10-16)

Divisive dialogue: Why do we engage in virtual political talk?
UNLV social media expert Natalie Pennington explores the impact of politics and partisanship on online friendships. (2020-10-14)

Menacing assaults on science causing alarming and avoidable deaths in the U.S.
In 2016, the U.S. was judged to have been best prepared for the existential threat of a pandemic, but turned out to be the least prepared for the actual threat. In a commentary, researchers say that ''pandemic politics'' is causing assaults on science, the FDA and CDC. They say that politicization of the FDA and CDC is creating continued losses of trust by the U.S. public and continued harm to their longstanding reputations of respect and admiration worldwide. (2020-10-12)

Candidates who lie more likely to win elections - new study
A new economics experiment suggests the electoral system attracts candidates who are dishonest and highlights why greater transparency might foster more trust in politics. (2020-10-08)

Women are more concerned about COVID-19 than men, Dartmouth-Gallup study finds
A Dartmouth-Gallup study finds that women are more concerned about COVID-19 than men, a difference that transcends party lines. This female perspective towards the pandemic may be overlooked due to the underrepresentation of women in the workplace that is compounded by an underrepresentation in politics, creating what the researchers refer to as a representational 'double whammy' effect. The study's findings are published in Politics & Gender. (2020-10-07)

Voter reactions to MeToo Scandals: Sexism, not partisanship, has the largest impact
Sexist attitudes influence how politicians accused of sexual misconduct are viewed, even more than partisanship, according to a Dartmouth study. The findings are published in Research and Politics. (2020-09-30)

Higher narcissism may be linked with more political participation
A politically engaged electorate is key to any thriving democracy, but not everyone participates in elections and other political activities. New Penn State research found that people who are narcissistic may also be more politically active. (2020-09-25)

From carbon taxes to tax breaks, emission reduction policies have widespread support
As the general election nears amid a historic season of hurricanes, wildfires, and heat waves, a new survey finds that majorities of Americans are supportive of climate change mitigation measures. This suggests that policymakers can introduce legislation that would enjoy public approval--including a green stimulus package to help deal with the economic downturn associated with COVID-19. (2020-09-23)

Fostering 'political' attitude adjustments
When political views are at the extreme ends of the spectrum, they are known as political polarization. Now, communication experts at the University of Missouri have developed a writing exercise as a way to reduce polarization in US politics. (2020-09-22)

Momentum of unprecedented Chilean uprising stalled by COVID-19 pandemic
The uprising that erupted in fall 2019 in Chile against the post-dictatorship government may be diminished by the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2020-09-17)

Climate engineering: Modelling projections oversimplify risks
Climate change is gaining prominence as a political and public priority. But many ambitious climate action plans foresee the use of climate engineering technologies whose risks are insufficiently understood. In a new publication, researchers from the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies in Potsdam, Germany, describe how evolving modelling practices are trending towards ''best-case'' projections. They warn that over-optimistic expectations of climate engineering may reinforce the inertia with which industry and politics have been addressing decarbonisation. (2020-09-09)

Political ads have little persuasive power
Every four years, US presidential campaigns collectively spend billions of dollars flooding TV screens across the country with political ads. But a new study co-authored by Yale political scientist Alexander Coppock shows that, regardless of content, context, or audience, those pricey commercials do little to persuade voters. (2020-09-02)

Research challenges popular belief that 'unbridled ambition' costs female candidates votes
A new study into voter behaviour in the US and UK argues that electorates value aspiration and ambition among female candidates seeking office challenging common assumptions. (2020-08-19)

The brains of nonpartisans are different from those who register to vote with a party
The brains of people with no political allegiance are different from those who strongly support one party, major new research shows. (2020-08-10)

A rebranding of 'freedom'?
According to recent Gallup polls, socialism is now more popular than capitalism among Democrats and young people, and support for ''some form of socialism'' among all Americans is at 43% (compared to 25% in 1942). Policies that went unmentioned or were declared out-of-bounds in elections four years ago -- a federal jobs guarantee, single-payer health care, free college, massive tax hikes on the rich, and the Green New Deal--are commonplace in Democrats' 2020 campaigns. (2020-07-31)

Researchers develop a method for predicting unprecedented events
Researchers combined avalanche physics with ecosystem data to create a computational method for predicting extreme ecological events. The method may also have applications in economics and politics. (2020-07-23)

Climate predictions several years into the future?
In five years, will the winter be mild, and will the following summer be rainy? Unfortunately, reliable answers to such questions are not possible. Nevertheless, there are quantities like the sea surface temperature of the North Atlantic, that are known to promote trends in the weather over Europe. To that, North Atlantic sea surface temperatures are predictable several years into the future - as suggested by a new study. (2020-07-22)

Tracking misinformation campaigns in real-time is possible, study shows
A research team led by Princeton University has developed a technique for tracking online foreign misinformation campaigns in real time, which could help mitigate outside interference in the 2020 American election. (2020-07-22)

AJTMH July updates
Below is an update of COVID-19 articles published in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (AJTMH). We've highlighted below those that we think may of interest for your reporting. (2020-07-22)

Do campaign finance reforms truly help make elections more competitive?
A new study by two social scientists at the University of Missouri finds state campaign finance reforms actually have no beneficial effect on the competitiveness of state legislative elections. Instead, some reforms, such as limits on corporate political spending and public financing of elections, advantage incumbents. (2020-07-15)

Study links attraction to 'tyrannical' leaders to dysfunctional family dynamics
An SF State Assistant Professor of Management found a link between dysfunctional family conflict and the types of leaders people follows as adults. (2020-07-13)

Simultaneous, reinforcing policy failures led to Flint water crisis, providing lessons during pandemic
Concurrent failures of federal drinking water standards and Michigan's emergency manager law reinforced and magnified each other, leading to the Flint water crisis, according to a University of Michigan environmental policy expert. (2020-07-13)

Spanish language increasingly more relevant to presidential elections
Discourse in and about Spanish was present on both sides of the political spectrum, more so leading up to the 2016 presidential election than in previous cycles, according to research conducted by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2020-07-01)

Page 1 of 21 | 832 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.