Current Polymers News and Events

Current Polymers News and Events, Polymers News Articles.
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Miniscule robots of metal and plastic
Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a technique for manufacturing micrometre-long machines by interlocking multiple materials in a complex way. Such microrobots will one day revolutionize the field of medicine. (2020-11-24)

Taking a shine to polymers: Fluorescent molecule betrays the breakdown of polymer materials
Scientists at the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have come up with a simple method to evaluate the strength and performance of polymer materials. They present their innovation in the latest issue of Angewandte Chemie International Edition, and hope that their work will enable scientists and engineers to better evaluate the polymers they work with, and eventually synthesize better ones. (2020-11-24)

Did early life need long, complex molecules to make cell-like compartments?
Protocell compartments used as models for an important step in the early evolution of life on Earth can be made from short polymers. (2020-11-23)

New solvent-based recycling process could cut down on millions of tons of plastic waste
Multilayer plastic materials are ubiquitous in food and medical supply packaging, particularly since layering polymers can give those films specific properties, like heat resistance or oxygen and moisture control. But despite their utility, those ever-present plastics are impossible to recycle using conventional methods. (2020-11-20)

Supramolecular chemistry - Self-constructed folded macrocycles with low symmetry
The synthesis and self-organization of biological macromolecules is essential for life on earth. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich chemists now report the spontaneous emergence of complex ring-shaped macromolecules with low degrees of symmetry in the laboratory. (2020-11-20)

New process narrows the gap between natural and synthetic materials
Skin and cartilage are both strong and flexible - properties that are hard to replicate in artificial materials. But a new fabrication process, developed by scientists at EPFL, brings lifelike synthetic polymers a step closer. (2020-11-19)

Seeking the most effective polymers for personal protective equipment
Personal protective equipment, like face masks and gowns, is generally made of polymers. But not much attention is typically given to the selection of polymers used beyond their physical properties. To help with the identification of materials that will bind to a virus and speed its inactivation for use in PPE, researchers have developed a high-throughput approach for analyzing the interactions between materials and viruslike particles. They report their method in the journal Biointerphases. (2020-11-17)

Sensors get a laser shape up
Laser writing breathes life into high-performance sensing platforms. (2020-11-15)

Researchers develop ultra-fast polymer modulators that can take the heat
Researchers in Japan have demonstrated a silicon-polymer hybrid modulator that can efficiently and reliably transmit data at 200 Gbit/s over an extremely wide range of temperatures from 25 °C to 110 °C. Use of such robust modulators in high-speed data applications could reduce cooling demands of the systems and expand applications in harsh environments. (2020-11-13)

3D print experts discover how to make tomorrow's technology using ink-jet printed graphene
The University of Nottingham has cracked the conundrum of how to use inks to 3D-print novel electronic devices with useful properties, such as an ability to convert light into electricity. (2020-11-04)

Solar cells of the future
Organic solar cells are cheaper to produce and more flexible than their counterparts made of crystalline silicon, but do not offer the same level of efficiency or stability. During his doctoral thesis, Andrej Classen, who is a young researcher at FAU, demonstrated that increases in efficiency can be achieved using luminescent acceptor molecules. (2020-11-03)

Smart bottle brushes
They look like microscopic bottle brushes: Polymers with a backbone and tufts of side arms. This molecular design gives them unusual abilities: For example, they can bind active agents and release them again when the temperature changes. With the help of neutrons, a research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now succeeded to unveil the changes in the internal structure in course of the process. (2020-10-29)

Scientists discover new organic compounds that could have helped form the first cells
Chemists studying how life started often focus on biopolymers like peptides and nucleic acids, but modern biopolymers don't form easily without help from living organisms. A possible solution to this paradox is that life started using different components, and many non-biological chemicals were likely abundant in the environment. A new survey of a diverse set of such compounds under primitive environmental conditions found many of these easily formed polymers and some spontaneously formed cell-like structures. (2020-10-28)

Models for potential precursors of cells endure simulated early-Earth conditions
Membraneless compartments--models for a potential step in the early evolution of cells--have been shown to persist or form, disappear, and reform in predictable ways through multiple cycles of dehydration and rehydration. (2020-10-28)

Stay focused: Algae-inspired polymers light the way for enhanced night vision
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba processed sulfur, and algae and plant compounds, into an elastic lens that maintains substantial variable focus in infrared imaging. This development will be useful in policing, firefighting, ecology, and many other applications where it's critical to see detail at variable distances in dark environments, such as at night or through smoke. (2020-10-27)

Ultraheavy precision polymers
An environmentally friendly and sustainable synthesis of ''heavyweight'' polymers with very narrow molecular weight distributions is an important concept in modern polymer chemistry. Thanks to a new photoenzymatic process, Chinese researchers have been able to increase the range of possible monomers. As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the researchers were able to obtain well-defined linear and star-shaped polymers with ultrahigh molecular weights. (2020-10-27)

High-thermoresistant biopolyimides become water-soluble like starch
This is the first report for the syntheses of water-soluble polyimides which are Interestingly derived from bio-based resources, showing high transparency, tunable mechanical strength and the highest thermoresistance in water-soluble polymers reported ever. (2020-10-26)

Closing the plastic loop
Researchers develop a one-pot, low temperature catalytic method to turn polyethylene polymers into alkylaromatic molecules. (2020-10-22)

The highest heat-resistant plastic ever is developed from biomass
The use of biomass-derived plastics is one of the prime concerns to establish a sustainable society, which is incorporated as one of the Sustainable Development Goals. However, the use of most of the biomass-derived plastics is limited due to their low heat resistance. Collaborative research between JAIST and U-Tokyo has successfully developed the white-biotechnological conversion from cellulosic biomass into the aromatic polymers having the highest thermodegradation of all the plastics reported ever. (2020-10-21)

Results from host-reduce-polytech-ACS trial reported at TCT Connect
A randomized clinical trial found that drug-eluting stents (DES) with durable polymers are non-inferior to DES with biodegradable polymers in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Findings were reported today at TCT Connect, the 32nd annual scientific symposium of the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF). TCT is the world's premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine. (2020-10-17)

A new strategy for siRNA stabilization by an artificial cationic oligosaccharide
Instability of small interfering RNA (siRNA) is one of the obstacles in the development of siRNA-based drugs. Researchers at Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science and Tokyo University of Science have developed a new strategy for improvement of siRNA stability by using an artificial cationic oligosaccharide combined with phosphorothioate linkages. (2020-10-16)

DNA-peptide interactions create complex behaviours which may have helped shape biology
DNA and proteins are two fundamental biochemical polymers found in all living cells. They are very different in terms of their molecular properties: DNA is a remarkably homogenous polymer in terms of its molecular properties, while proteins can be extremely heterogeneous with regard to these properties. New research suggests the intrinsic ways that DNA and proteins interact at molecular level can lead to extremely diverse behaviours that may helped shape important aspects of modern biology. (2020-10-14)

Energy-harvesting plastics pass the acid test
Air-stable coatings can improve the longevity of wearable devices that tap into body heat. (2020-10-06)

FSU researchers help develop sustainable polymers
Researchers at the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering have made new discoveries on the effects of temperature on sustainable polymers. Their findings may help the industry to produce plastics that are better for the environment. (2020-09-25)

Impurities enhance polymer LED efficiencies
New research published in EPJ B reveals that the higher-than-expected efficiency of PLEDs can be reached through interactions between triplet excitons, and impurities embedded in their polymer layers. (2020-09-24)

NIST scientists get soft on 3D printing
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a new method of 3D-printing gels and other soft materials. Published in a new paper, it has the potential to create complex structures with nanometer-scale precision. (2020-09-22)

Defying a 150-year-old rule for phase behavior
Today, researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology and University Paris-Saclay are defying a classical theory from American physicist Josiah Willard Gibbs, with proof of a five-phase equilibrium, something that many scholars considered impossible. (2020-09-18)

Researchers discover new photoactivation mechanism for polymer production
A team of researchers has demonstrated a way to use low-energy, visible light to produce polymer gel objects from pure monomer solutions. The work not only poses a potential solution to current challenges in producing these materials, it also sheds further light on the ways in which low energy photons can combine to produce high energy excited states. (2020-09-16)

Sturdy fabric-based piezoelectric energy harvester takes us one step closer to wearable electronics
KAIST researchers presented a highly flexible but sturdy wearable piezoelectric harvester using the simple and easy fabrication process of hot pressing and tape casting. This energy harvester, which has record high interfacial adhesion strength, will take us one step closer to being able to manufacture embedded wearable electronics. (2020-09-16)

Cascades with carbon dioxide
Carbon dioxide (CO(2)) is not just an undesirable greenhouse gas, it is also an interesting source of raw materials that are valuable and can be recycled sustainably. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, Spanish researchers have now introduced a novel catalytic process for converting CO(2) into valuable chemical intermediates in the form of cyclic carbonates. (2020-09-08)

Direct observation of desorption of a melt of long polymer chains
Publication in Nature Communication: Simone Napolitano -Laboratory of Polymer and Soft Matter Dynamics, Université libre de Bruxelles - and his collaborators, Xavier Monnier and Daniele Cangialosi, from the International Center of Physics of Donostia and the Centro de Física de Materiales of San Sebastián (Spain) were able to experimentally access the adsorption/desorption transition. (2020-09-01)

Novel alkaline hydrogel advances skin wound care
Effective wound care requires the maintenance of optimal conditions for skin and tissue regeneration. Hydrogels provide many of these conditions, but not an alkaline environment. Now, in a breakthrough study, scientists at Tokyo University of Science, Japan, have developed a new method that requires no specialized equipment and can be performed at room temperature to produce an alkaline hydrogel in five minutes, allowing its easy implementation in any medical practice for superior wound healing. (2020-08-26)

Synthetic coating for the GI tract could deliver drugs or aid in digestion
MIT engineers have devised a way to apply a temporary synthetic coating to the lining of the small intestine. This coating could be adapted to deliver drugs, aid in digestion, or prevent nutrients such as glucose from being absorbed. (2020-08-26)

Planetary ball-milling helps protect our planet from plastics pollution
Researchers at Osaka University have developed supramolecular polymeric materials that combine rapid self-healing with high toughness by using the efficient molecular mixing method of planetary ball-milling. These materials retain their unique properties even after recycling, thus extending their functional lifespan. In a time of overabundant waste plastics, prolonging their usage is an eco-friendly solution. Moreover, their artificial skin-like behavior holds great potential for application to the fields of robotics and cars. (2020-08-26)

Polymers prevent potentially hazardous mist during dentist visit
If the mist in a dentist's office -- sent flying into the air by spinning, vibrating tools -- contains a virus or some other pathogen, it is a health hazard. So researchers in Illinois studied the viscoelastic properties of food-grade polymers and discovered that the forces of a vibrating tool or dentist's drill are no match for them. Not only did a small admixture of polymers completely eliminate aerosolization, but it did so with ease. (2020-08-25)

Small enzyme-mimicking polymers may have helped start life
Most origins of life research is focused on understanding the prebiotic formation of biological building blocks. However, it is possible that early biological evolution relied on chemical compounds that are no longer used by modern biology. Recent research at ELSI has found that small highly branched polymers, which can be formed under the types of conditions thought common on primitive Earth, are capable of acting as catalysts similar to highly evolved modern biological enzymes. (2020-08-20)

'Cyborg' technology could enable new diagnostics, merger of humans and AI
Although true ''cyborgs'' are science fiction, researchers are moving toward integrating electronics with the body. Such devices could monitor tumors or replace damaged tissues. But connecting electronics directly to human tissues in the body is a huge challenge. Today, a team is reporting new coatings for components that could help them more easily fit into this environment. The researchers will present their results at the American Chemical Society Fall 2020 Virtual Meeting & Expo. (2020-08-17)

Spider silk inspires new class of functional synthetic polymers
Synthetic polymers have changed the world around us. However, It is hard to finely tune some of their properties, such as the ability to transport ions. To overcome this problem, assistant professor Giuseppe Portale decided to take inspiration from nature and created a new class of polymers based on protein-like materials that work as proton conductors and might be useful in future bio-electronic devices. (2020-08-12)

Aquatic robots can remove contaminant particles from water
Scientists from WMG at the University of Warwick, led by Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands, developed a 1cm by 1cm wireless artificial aquatic polyp, which can remove contaminants from water. Apart from cleaning, this soft robot could be also used in medical diagnostic devices by aiding in picking up and transporting specific cells for analysis. (2020-08-10)

Sulfur-containing polymer generates high refractive index and transparency?
Researchers reported a novel technology enhancing the high transparency of refractive polymer film via a one-step vapor deposition process. The sulfur-containing polymer (SCP) film produced by Professor Sung Gap Im's research team at KAIST's Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering has exhibited excellent environmental stability and chemical resistance, which is highly desirable for its application in long-term optical device applications. (2020-08-04)

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