Current Popular Culture News and Events

Current Popular Culture News and Events, Popular Culture News Articles.
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Oncotarget: MEK is a promising target in the basal subtype of bladder cancer
''The @Oncotarget authors demonstrate that MEK inhibitors are a promising targeted therapy for the basal subtype of bladder cancer, and their data indicate that drug screening of 3D cultures provides an important resource for hypothesis generation'' (2021-02-22)

AI may mistake chess discussions as racist talk
'The Queen's Gambit,' the recent TV mini-series about a chess master, may have stirred increased interest in chess, but a word to the wise: social media talk about game-piece colors could lead to misunderstandings, at least for hate-speech detection software. (2021-02-18)

The power of groupthink: Study shows why ideas spread in social networks
New research shows that large groups of people all tend to think alike, and also illustrates how easily people's opinions can be swayed by social media--even by artificial users known as bots. (2021-02-10)

Key metaphors in the most popular love songs speak of proximity and possession
According to a study by Salvador Climent Roca and Marta Coll-Florit from the GRIAL applied linguistics research group (tied to the UOC Faculty of Arts and Humanities), love is central to 52 of the 71 songs that topped the Billboard magazine's year-end charts from 1946 to 2016. ''Pop music is created to achieve commercial success, and evocations of feelings of love and unrequited love are powerfully attractive for all types of audiences,'' said the authors. (2021-02-09)

Exercise caution after working out in virtual reality
Virtual 'exergaming' has become a popular way to exercise - especially among younger people - since the release of virtual reality (VR) fitness games on consoles such as Nintendo and Playstation. But while VR is undoubtedly raising fitness games to a whole new level, researchers at the University of South Australia are cautioning players about the potential side effects of VR, particularly in the first hour after playing. (2021-02-04)

Sneakerheads, not hypebeasts: Defining a sneaker-driven sub-culture
Researchers report new insights into the motivations, brand preferences and identity considerations of Sneakerheads. (2021-02-03)

Cancer research expands body's own immune system to kill tumors
Scientists are hoping advances in cancer research could lead to a day when a patient's own immune system could be used to fight and destroy a wide range of tumors. Cancer immunotherapy has some remarkable successes, but its effectiveness has been limited to a relatively small handful of cancers. In APL Bioengineering, researchers describe how advances in engineering models of tumors can greatly expand cancer immunotherapy's effectiveness to a wider range of cancers. (2021-02-02)

New variety of paintbrush lily developed by a novel plant tissue culture technique
Scientists at Hokkaido University and Chiba University have developed simultaneous triploid and hexaploid varieties of Haemanthus albiflos by the application of endosperm culture, thus extending the use of this technique. (2021-01-22)

Burial practices point to an interconnected early Medieval Europe
Changes in Western European burial practices spread rapidly during the 6th - 8th centuries AD, providing strong evidence that early Medieval Europe was a well-connected place with a shared culture. (2021-01-21)

Behavioral traits converge for humans and animals sharing an environment
Humans, mammals and birds that live in a particular environment share a common set of behavioral traits, according to a new study, which identifies a local convergence of foraging, reproductive and social behaviors across species. (2021-01-14)

Rising health risks mean stronger regulations needed for smokeless tobacco
Researchers at the University of York are calling for more stringent regulatory measures to reduce the health burden of smokeless tobacco, a product often found in UK stores without the proper health warnings and as a result of illicit trading. (2021-01-12)

Inspired by kombucha tea, engineers create "living materials"
Engineers at MIT and Imperial College London have developed a new way to generate tough, functional materials using a mix of bacteria and yeast similar to the ''kombucha mother'' used to ferment tea. Using this mix, called a Syn-SCOBY (synthetic symbiotic culture of bacteria and yeast), they produced cellulose embedded with enzymes that can perform a variety of functions, such as sensing environmental pollutants. (2021-01-11)

Metabolic potential and molecular diversity of natural products from microorganisms
Metabolic potential and molecular diversity of natural products from microorganisms https://doi.org/10.1007/s42995-020-00077-5 Announcing a new publication for Marine Life Science & Technology journal. In this review article the authors consider the metabolic potential and molecular diversity of natural products from microorganisms. (2021-01-10)

New bacterial culture methods could result in the discovery of new species
A new microbial study explored the bacterial diversity of the Tabernas Desert located in the south-eastern Spain. Using simple tweaks of the traditional bacterial culture methods, the researchers isolated more than 250 bacterial strains of which 80 could be possible new bacteria species. (2021-01-05)

Hotels that promote women perceived as fairer, less discriminatory
New research led by the University of Houston Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management suggests hotel companies that promote a woman over an equally qualified man are perceived as fairer and less discriminatory, creating a stronger organizational culture and higher financial performance. (2021-01-05)

Facebook posts help facilitate belief that HPV vaccine is dangerous to health
Social media has a history of being a popular place for sexual health discussions, and the HPV vaccine is one of the most discussed vaccines on the internet. Monique Luisi, an assistant professor in the University of Missouri School of Journalism, suggests some HPV vaccine-related Facebook posts can help facilitate beliefs that the HPV vaccine is dangerous to one's health. She believes it could inform officials for the ongoing COVID-19 vaccine roll out and distribution. (2021-01-05)

In kefir, microbial teamwork makes the dream work
While scientists know that microorganisms often live in communities and depend on their fellow community members for survival, mechanistic knowledge of this phenomenon has been quite limited. Researchers from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory combined a variety of state-of-the-art methods to better understand the microbial communities. This revealed that cooperation allows the microbes to do something they can't do alone. (2021-01-04)

Female language style promotes visibility and influence online
A female-typical language style promotes the popularity of talks in the digital context and turns out to be an underappreciated but highly effective tool for social influence. This was shown by UZH psychologists in an international study in which they analyzed 1,100 TED Talks. (2020-12-16)

Popular European football games linked to traffic accidents in Asia
Days when high profile European football matches are played are associated with more traffic accidents in Asia than days when less popular matches are played, finds a study in the Christmas issue of The BMJ. (2020-12-16)

Sights set on curbing gun crime
A community or sub-culture encouraging young men's exposure and obsession with guns - as well as ready access to firearms and drugs - can make gun violence 'all too easy', with Flinders University experts promoting a new direction on managing the global problem. Flinders criminologists conclude that the need to 'dematerialise' the attraction to gun has ''never been greater'' than ''in a post-COVID-19 world in which guns have gained greater salience in many countries''. (2020-12-15)

A new evolutionary clue
Colleen B. Young, a graduate student in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Missouri, tested several popular assumptions about the characteristics of Homo floresiensis by comparing an island fox from California's Channel Islands with its mainland US relative, the gray fox. (2020-12-09)

Biological diversity evokes happiness
A high biodiversity in our vicinity is as important for life satisfaction as our income, scientists from Senckenberg, the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), and Kiel University found. All across Europe, the individual enjoyment of life correlates with the number of surrounding bird species. An additional 10% of bird species therefore increases the Europeans' life satisfaction as much as a comparable increase in income. Nature conservation thus constitutes an investment in human well-being. (2020-12-04)

Researchers study influence of cultural factors on gesture design
Freehand gesture-based interfaces in interactive systems are becoming more common, but what if your preferred way to gesture a command - say, changing the TV to channel 10 - significantly differed from that of a user from another culture? Would the system recognize your command? Researchers from the Penn State College of Information Sciences and Technology and their collaborators explored this question and found that some gesture choices are significantly influenced by the cultural backgrounds of participants. (2020-12-01)

The German press disparages dissenting voices on climate change
According to research presented in an article published in the journal Media Culture & Society on 8 October by Lena von Zabern, winning alumni of the award for best master's degree final project in UPF Planetary Wellbeing, and Christopher D. Tulloch, her supervisor and researcher with the Department of Communication. (2020-11-26)

Transcultural literacies and meaning-making through fanfiction
This is the subject of analysis of a digital ethnography study by Liudmila Shafirova, Daniel Cassany and Carme Bach, all members of the GR@EL research group at the Department of Translation and Language Sciences, published in Journal of Language and Intercultural Communication on 24 September. (2020-11-25)

High achievement cultures may kill students' interest in math -- especially for girls
In countries where academic performance in math is high, students paradoxically tend to have lower levels of interest in the subject. A recent study suggests that this effect is even stronger among girls, potentially explaining why they tend to do slightly less well at math than their male peers in high-achieving countries. (2020-11-25)

For asymbiotic growth of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, feed them fatty acids
Scientists around the world have been working to grow arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi without their host plants because they can be used as organic fertilizer in agriculture and forestry. AM fungi help plants receive nutrients from the soil through a network that is efficient and far more reaching than their own roots can provide. Shinshu University group successfully demonstrated that AM fungi can be grown asymbiotically when given myristate as a carbon and energy source. (2020-11-09)

How Twitter takes votes away from Trump but not from Republicans
In the 2016 US presidential election, Twitter made independent voters less likely to vote for Donald Trump, finds new study from Bocconi University and Princeton (2020-10-29)

Kid influencers are promoting junk food brands on YouTube -- garnering more than a billion views
Kids with wildly popular YouTube channels are frequently promoting unhealthy food and drinks in their videos, warn researchers at NYU School of Global Public Health and NYU Grossman School of Medicine in a new study published in the journal Pediatrics. (2020-10-26)

Evidence review confirms CDC guidance about infectivity of novel coronavirus
A new review of dozens of studies suggests that people may shed virus for prolonged periods, but those with mild or no symptoms may be infectious for no more than about 10 days. People who are severely ill from COVID-19 may be infectious for as long as 20 days, according to the review. (2020-10-20)

LSU Health New Orleans review suggests HNB tobacco products may threaten health
A review of heat-not-burn (HNB) tobacco products from LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, reports an association with elevated blood pressure, increased heart rate, cell death, and circulatory dysfunction shown by early studies. Additionally, chemicals found in the vapor produced by HNB devices have previously been shown to impair lung function, put users at risk of heart attack and stroke, cause cancers, increase circulating low-density lipoprotein (''bad cholesterol'') and more. (2020-10-19)

Projecting favorable perceptions of space
For anthropologists and other social scientists, the space race in the 1950s served as a period of cultural and technological transformation as well as an opportunity to advance the public good. (2020-10-19)

Study finds athletes fear being judged as weak when they experience pain or injury
Trinity College Dublin researchers have carried out the first multi-centred, international, qualitative study exploring the athlete experience (in their own words) of sporting low back pain (LBP). The study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine found a culture of concealment of pain and injury in rowers, leading to poor outcomes for these athletes. (2020-10-15)

Ingestible capsule that could help demystify the gut-brain axis
A team of University of Maryland experts from engineering, neuroscience, applied microbiology, and physics has been making headway on building a platform that can monitor and model the real-time processing of gut microbiome serotonin activity. (2020-10-15)

Computational approach to optimise culture conditions required for cell therapy
Collaboration by researchers in Singapore and Australia lead to first-of-its-kind computational biology algorithm that could enable more effective cellular therapies against major diseases. (2020-10-12)

Teen social networks linked to adult depression
Teens who have a larger number of friends may be less likely to suffer from depression later in life, especially women, a new MSU research study has found. (2020-09-30)

Recording thousands of nerve cell impulses at high resolution
ETH Zurich researchers have developed a new generation of microelectrode-array chips for measuring nerve impulses, enabling studies of how thousands of nerve cells interact with each other. (2020-09-28)

"New" lactic acid bacteria can make African camel milk safe
A research project headed by the Technical University of Denmark, DTU, has come up with the formula for a freeze-dried starter culture that African camel milk farmers can use to make safe, fermented milk products. (2020-09-22)

Analysis shows high level of SARS-CoV-2 contamination in patient toilets, staff and public areas in hosptials
A systematic review of evidence being presented at this week's ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease shows that air around patients with COVID-19, as well as patients toilets, and staff and public areas in hospitals are all show significant levels of contamination with SARS-CoV-2. (2020-09-22)

Devi mangiare! Why culture may be contributing to disordered eating among women
'You have to eat!' It's a sentiment that illustrates how central food is to Italian culture, but the woman who uttered these words also happens to be struggling with bulimia nervosa. (2020-09-16)

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