Current Population Growth News and Events

Current Population Growth News and Events, Population Growth News Articles.
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Antibiotic could be repurposed and added to tuberculosis treatment arsenal
Research has found fidaxomicin, an antibiotic usually used to treat bowel infections, prevents growth of resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) in the lab. (2021-02-17)

Biosensors monitor plant well-being in real time
Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, have developed biosensors that make it possible to monitor sugar levels in real time deep in the plant tissues - something that has previously been impossible. The information from the sensors may help agriculture to adapt production as the world faces climate change. The results have been published in the scientific journal iScience. (2021-02-11)

Brazil: Air conditioning equipment days of use will double without climate action
Increasing demand for space cooling in Brazil will increase greenhouse gas emissions by 70-190% due to air conditioners, depending on how much we will mitigate climate change. A study carried out with the contribution of CMCC@Ca'Foscari explains the relationship between climate change, space cooling needs, and electricity demand in different regions of the country. (2021-02-10)

Hidden conflict in the mutually beneficial relationship between legumes and rhizobia
The mutually beneficial relationship between legumes and rhizobia is one of the most well-known and agronomically important examples of symbiosis. A study led by Chapman University's Kenjiro Quides tested the boundaries of this relationship -- and found that it's not always as perfectly harmonious as previously thought. Reported in the journal Evolution, the results suggest a hidden conflict in the symbiotic relationship and provides support for the conclusion that rhizobia have an evolutionary advantage. (2021-02-10)

New factor in the carbon cycle of the Southern Ocean identified
The Southern Ocean is one of the key regions for understanding the climate system. The photosynthesis-performing plankton there contribute significantly to controlling the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. But which factors favor or limit plankton growth? Researchers have now published a study showing for the first time that, in addition to the micronutrient iron, manganese can play an important role. Among other things, the results have implications for understanding ice ages in the past. (2021-02-09)

Study shows flu vaccine lessens COVID-19 symptoms in children
Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have discovered that children who receive a seasonal flu shot are less likely to suffer symptoms from a COVID-19 infection. The finding comes from a review of more than 900 children diagnosed with COVID-19 in 2020. (2021-02-04)

DNA-based technique allows researchers to determine age of living beluga whales in Alaska
Researchers can now determine the age and sex of living beluga whales in Alaska's Cook Inlet thanks to a new DNA-based technique that uses information from small samples of skin tissue. (2021-02-04)

Garlic and selenium increase stress resistance in carps, says a RUDN University biologist
A biologist from RUDN University confirmed that selenium nanoparticles and garlic extract can effectively reduce the negative impact of stress on the health of grass carp in the breeding industry. (2021-02-04)

Human activity caused the long-term growth of greenhouse gas methane
Decadal growth rate of methane in the atmosphere varied dramatically over the past 30 yeas with three distinct periods of slowed (1988-1998), quasi-stationary (1999-2006) and renewed (2007-2016) phases. An inverse analysis with atmospheric chemistry transport modeling explained these variations consistently. While emissions from oil and gas exploitation and natural climate events caused the slowed growth and the temporary pause, those from coal mining in China and livestock farming in the tropics drove the renewed growth. (2021-01-29)

Local emissions amplify regional haze and particle growth
A Finnish-Chinese research team performed simultaneous measurements of aerosol composition and particle number size distributions at ground level and at 260 m in central Beijing, China, during a total of 4 months in 2015-2017. The team found concentration of both primary and secondary particles in the accumulation mode would decrease drastically, and the haze formation would be reduced if the emission cuts are higher than 30%. (2021-01-29)

Role of dams in reducing global flood exposure under climate change
A new collaborative study led by researchers at the National Institute for Environmental Studies, the University of Tokyo, and Michigan State University exposes the role of dams for mitigating flood risk under climate change. Flood is amongst the costliest natural disasters. Globally, flood risk is projected to increase in the future, driven by climate change and population growth. The role of dams in flood mitigation, previously unaccounted for, was found to decrease by approximately 15% the number of people globally exposed to historical once-in-100-year floods, downstream of dams during the 21st century. (2021-01-22)

Breakthrough in understanding 'tummy bug' bacteria
Scientists have discovered how bacteria commonly responsible for seafood-related stomach upsets can go dormant and then ''wake up''. (2021-01-20)

The physics behind tumor growth
Researchers at Duke University have developed a predictive theory for tumor growth that approaches the subject from a new point of view. Rather than focusing on the biological mechanisms of cellular growth, the researchers instead use thermodynamics and the physical space the tumor is expanding into to predict its evolution from a single cell to a complex cancerous mass. (2021-01-20)

Lack of managers keeps India's businesses small
In today's economy, American businesses often tap into professional management to grow, but most firms in India and other developing countries are family owned and often shun outside managers. A new study co-authored by Yale economist Michael Peters explores the effects that the absence of outside professional management has on India's businesses and the country's economy. (2021-01-14)

Plant roots sense compacted soil through gaseous hormone signals
The volatile plant hormone ethylene allows plant roots to sense and avoid compacted soils, researchers report. (2021-01-14)

Expert prognosis for the planet - we're on track for a ghastly future
An international group of 17 leading scientists have produced a comprehensive yet concise assessment of the state of civilization, warning that the outlook is more dire and dangerous than is generally understood. (2021-01-13)

Discovery of 'adolescent' skeletal stem cells might someday help prevent osteoporosis
A new study reported in STEM CELLS reveals a unique population of skeletal stem cells (SSCs) that function during the transitional period between rapid bone growth and bone maintenance. (2021-01-13)

A 'ghastly future' unless extraordinary action is taken soon on sustainability
Without immediate, drastic intervention, humans face a ''ghastly future'' -- including declining health, climate devastation, tens of millions of environmental migrants and more pandemics -- in the next several decades, according to an international team of 17 prominent scientists. The researchers cite more than 150 scientific studies and conclude, ''That we are already on the path of a sixth major extinction is now scientifically undeniable.'' (2021-01-13)

First-degree relative with kidney disease increases disease risk by three-fold
In a large population-based family study, family history of kidney disease was strongly associated with increased risk of chronic kidney disease. (2021-01-12)

New challenges for wolf conservation
The predator's growing population could cause conflict with keepers of grazing animals and risk several conservation goals. (2021-01-07)

First global study shows uneven urbanization among large cities in the last two decades
In the first-ever study on the characteristics of urbanization in large cities around the world, researchers at the University of Hong Kong analyzed cities' urban built-up areas (BUAs) expansion, population growth and greening BUA changes, and revealed a hugely uneven pace of urbanization in those cities in the last two decades. They warn against major challenges posed to sustainable development if the urban problems are not dealt with in a timely manner. (2021-01-06)

Gum disease-causing bacteria borrow growth molecules from neighbors to thrive
The human body is filled with friendly bacteria. However, some of these microorganisms, such as Veillonella parvula, may be too nice. These peaceful bacteria engage in a one-sided relationship with pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, helping the germ multiply and cause gum disease, according to a new University at Buffalo-led study. (2021-01-05)

Model predicts global threat of sinking land will affect 635 million people worldwide
A new analysis suggests that, by 2040, 19% of the world's population - accounting for 21% of the global Gross Domestic Product - will be impacted by subsidence, the sinking of the ground's surface, a phenomenon often caused by human activities such as groundwater removal, and by natural causes as well. (2020-12-31)

Skinnier but resilient geese thriving in the high Arctic
Barnacle geese in the Arctic have been on a diet. So many now migrate to northern breeding grounds that in some places there's less food to go around. The good news is that it doesn't seem to restrict their population growth -- yet. (2020-12-17)

COVID-19 spread increases when UV levels decrease
Natural variations in ultraviolet radiation influence the spread of COVID-19, but the influence is modest compared to preventive measures such as physical distancing, mask wearing, and quarantine, according to new research from Harvard University. (2020-12-16)

Newly discovered toxin-antitoxin system abundant in one-cell organisms
Bacteria are always hungry, according to Thomas Wood, Biotechnology Endowed Chair and professor of chemical engineering in the Penn State College of Engineering. If you gave a single bacterium all the food it wanted, it would obtain the mass of the Earth in about two days. (2020-12-11)

Study of virus attack rate in Manaus, Brazil, shows outcome of mostly unmitigated epidemic
Researchers studying data from blood donors in Manaus, Brazil, who experienced high mortality from SARS-CoV-2, estimate that more than 70% of the population was infected approximately seven months after the virus first arrived in the city. (2020-12-08)

Measurements of tree height can help cycad conservation decisions
A multi-national research team has exploited long-term data sets that span 2001 to 2018 to reveal the utility of tree height quantifications in informing conservation decisions of an arborescent cycad species. The field work was led by the University of Guam and targeted Cycas micronesica from the Micronesian Islands of Guam, Tinian, and Yap as the model species. (2020-12-07)

Mass incarceration results in significant increases in industrial emissions, study finds
Mass incarceration is as much an environmental problem as it is a social one, according to a new Portland State University study that finds increases in incarceration are significantly associated with increases in industrial emissions. (2020-12-04)

Researchers explore population size, density in rise of centralized power in antiquity
A University of Maine-led group of researchers developed Power Theory, a model emphasizing the role of demography in political centralization, and applied it to the shift in power dynamics in prehistoric northern coastal societies in Peru. To test the theory, the team created a summed probability distribution (SPD) from 755 radiocarbon dates from 10,000-1,000 B.P. Researchers found a correlation between the tenets of Power Theory and power structure changes in early Peruvian societies. (2020-11-30)

New modified wheat could help tackle global food shortage
Researchers at the University of York have created a new modified wheat variety that increases grain production by up to 12%. (2020-11-25)

Plant research seals importance of microbes for survival and growth
Scientists have revealed that plants have a 'sealing' mechanism supported by microbes in the root that are vital for the intake of nutrients for survival and growth. (2020-11-20)

A bypass route for the coronary vessels in the heart?
When the heart develops, some of its coronary blood vessels develop from cells lining the inner surface of the heart's ventricular chambers (endocardium). Novel findings suggest that new blood vessel growth in the heart can be stimulated with the VEGF-B growth factor from the same source after myocardial infarction to increase blood delivery to the damaged area. (2020-11-19)

Prostate cancer: CRYM protein inhibits tumour growth
Prostate cancer is caused by elevated hormone levels, and tumours are generally treated using hormone therapy. A research team headed by Lukas Kenner of MedUni Vienna in collaboration with David Heery from the University of Nottingham/UK and Sarka Pospisilova and Suzanne Turner of the University of Brno/Czech Republic have shown that the protein μ-crystallin (CRYM) plays a significant part in tumour growth. The higher the levels of this protein that are present, the better the prognosis. (2020-11-18)

Records from six growth studies analyzed to provide milestone data
For the first time ever, craniofacial growth in children can be studied comprehensively using data from six historic adolescent growth studies. Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine analyzed more than 15,000 cranial radiographs from nearly 2,000 participants to create the Craniofacial Growth Consortium Study (CGCS). (2020-11-17)

Global fisheries could alleviate a global food emergency in extreme situations
A new international study argues that, if managed sustainably in advance, global fisheries could alleviate food shortages even after a nuclear war. (2020-11-09)

Shifts in water temperatures affect eating habits of larval tuna at critical life stage
Small shifts in ocean temperature can have significant effects on the eating habits of blackfin tuna during the larval stage of development, when finding food and growing quickly are critical to long-term survival. (2020-11-05)

Dietary supplement may help in the treatment of fatty liver
A recent study by researchers at the University of Jyväskylä was successful in partially preventing fatty liver disease in rats. Rats with fatty liver disease were fed with a dietary supplement that is known to increase the growth of good bacteria in the gut. Simultaneous with the increased abundance of the bacteria, the liver fat content decreased significantly. In addition, preliminary results from a human study seem promising. (2020-11-04)

Violent encounters between gorillas slow population growth rate
A new study by the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund and UC Davis used five decades of data to show how social behavior explains fluctuations in the growth rate of a subpopulation of mountain gorillas. The researchers found that as gorilla group density increases, violent encounters between groups occur more frequently. As a result, infant mortality has increased dramatically, causing the population growth to slow down significantly in recent years. (2020-11-04)

Plot twist
The black rats weren't supposed to be there, on Palmyra Atoll. Likely arriving at the remote Pacific islet network as stowaways with the US Navy during World War II, the rodents, with no natural predators, simply took over. Omnivorous eating machines, they dined on seabird eggs, native crabs and whatever seed and seedling they could find. (2020-11-04)

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