Current Positive Emotions News and Events | Page 2

Current Positive Emotions News and Events, Positive Emotions News Articles.
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The video referee in the spotlight
Since the 2019/20 season, controversial referee calls in the English Premier League may be technically reviewed and, if deemed necessary, corrected. Using a Twitter analysis of 129 games in the English Premier League, a research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now determined how decisions made by video referees affect the mood of the fans. (2020-12-14)

The power of validation in helping people stay positive
Telling a distressed friend or family member something as simple as ''I understand why you feel that way'' can go a long way toward helping loved ones feel better, new research suggests. (2020-12-14)

Robots could replace real therapy dogs
Robotic animals could be the 'pawfect' replacement for our real-life furry friends, a new study published today by the University of Portsmouth has found. (2020-12-10)

Carbon fertilization effects are declining worldwide, limiting their role in climate change mitigation
The widely observed carbon fertilization effects on plant photosynthesis worldwide are declining, researchers report in a new study. (2020-12-10)

CTC dynamics may predict treatment response/prognosis in metastatic breast cancer patients
Early circulating tumor cell dynamics were associated with overall survival in patients with metastatic breast cancer, according to a meta-analysis presented at the 2020 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. (2020-12-09)

Hip-hop is helping tackle stigma around mental health, say Cambridge researchers
An article published today in BMJ Opinion explores the relationship between hip-hop and mental health, revealing how the genre has helped shine on light on the issues surrounding mental health. Drs Akeem Sule and Becky Inkster from the University of Cambridge - collectively known as Hip Hop Psych - argue that not only has hip-hop helped artists speak candidly, but it may also have helped people worldwide to acknowledge their own inner struggles. (2020-12-09)

Studying trust in autonomous products
Stanford engineers investigated how people's moods might affect their trust of autonomous products, such as smart speakers. They uncovered a complicated relationship. (2020-12-08)

Rap music increasingly mixes in mental health metaphors
The proportion of rap songs that referenced depression, suicide and mental health struggles more than doubled between 1998 and 2018, according to a study by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in JAMA Pediatrics. Through their lyrics, rap artists may shape conversations about mental health for their young listeners who are at an increased risk of experiencing mental health issues. (2020-12-07)

What makes COVID misinformation so tough to stop on social media
A recent study highlights two of the reasons that misinformation about COVID-19 is so difficult to tackle on social media: most people think they're above average at spotting misinformation; and misinformation often triggers negative emotions that resonate with people. The findings may help communicators share accurate information more effectively. (2020-12-07)

Research provides tools for achieving the 'how' of well-being in daily life
In a recently published paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison introduce a new framework for emotional well-being that focuses on specific skills that can be learned. (2020-12-07)

Using a video game to understand the origin of emotions
A number of studies have sought to connect given emotions, such as fear or pleasure, to specific areas of the brain, but without success. A research team from the University of Geneva analyzed volunteers while they were playing a video game that had been specially developed to arouse different emotions. The results, show that different emotional components recruit several neural networks in parallel distributed throughout the brain, and that their transient synchronization generates an emotional state. (2020-12-04)

No 'one-size-fits-all solution' for children exposed to domestic violence, researchers say
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University surveyed 105 agencies throughout Ohio to better understand service, policy and research needs--and get feedback about potential strategies to protect children from intimate partner violence. (2020-12-03)

Virus-like probes could help make rapid COVID-19 testing more accurate, reliable
Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed new and improved probes, known as positive controls, that could make it easier to validate rapid, point-of-care diagnostic tests for COVID-19 across the globe. The advance could help expand testing to low-resource, underserved areas. (2020-12-01)

Children with dyslexia show stronger emotional responses
Children diagnosed with dyslexia show greater emotional reactivity than children without dyslexia, according to a new collaborative study by UC San Francisco neuroscientists with the UCSF Dyslexia Center and UCSF Memory and Aging Center. (2020-12-01)

Mechanism of action of chloroquine/hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19 infection
The recent serious outbreak of Covid19 has required urgent medical treatments for numerous patients. No clinically active vaccines or antiviral agents are available for Covid19. According to several studies, Chloroquine (CQ) and Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) have shown promises as Covid19 antiviral especially when administered with Azithromycin (AZM). (2020-11-30)

Predi-COVID preliminary results
Launched under the aegis of the Research Luxembourg COVID-19 Task Force on April 24th, ''Predi-COVID '' is a cohort study promoted by the Luxembourg Institute of Health that aims to identify the key risk factors and biomarkers associated with COVID-19 severity and comprehend the long-term health consequences of the disease. The protocol of the study was published on November 24th in the British Medical Journal Open, reinforcing the international visibility and success of this highly collaborative ''Made in Luxembourg'' project. (2020-11-24)

Study involving seven children's hospitals shows COVID-19 typically mild in children
In the largest U.S. study of its kind to date, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and other PEDSnet sites report that of more than 135,000 pediatric patients tested for SARS-CoV-2 in pediatric health systems, 4% tested positive for the virus. However, the researchers also found patients from ethnic minorities, adolescents, patients with history of public insurance, and those with certain underlying medical conditions were more likely to test positive. (2020-11-23)

Scientists identify brain cells that help drive bodily reaction to fear, anxiety
UNC School of Medicine discovered that artificially forcing the activity of BNST cells in mice produced an arousal response in the form of dilated pupils and faster heart rate, and worsened anxiety-like behaviors. This helps illuminate the neural roots of emotions, and point to the possibility that the human-brain counterpart of the newly identified population of arousal-related neurons might be a target of future treatments for anxiety disorders and other illnesses involving abnormal arousal responses. (2020-11-23)

Memories create 'fingerprints' that reveal how the brain is organized
While the broad architecture and organization of the human brain is universal, new research shows how the differences between how people reimagine common scenarios can be observed in brain activity and quantified. These unique neurological signatures could ultimately be used to understand, study, and even improve treatment of disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. (2020-11-20)

Study of hope and optimism: New paper examines research in emerging fields
A new paper published by the John Templeton Foundation explores the latest scientific and philosophical research on the related but distinct virtues of hope and optimism. The 45-page white paper, written by Michael Milona, a philosophy professor at Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada, examines findings on the benefits and risks involved in both hope and optimism. It examines projects by more than 29 researchers worldwide on topics related to the effects of hope and optimism in education, faith, healthcare, politics, and more. (2020-11-19)

Lovestruck by oxytocin! Novel roles of the hormone in controlling male sexual function
Hormones are the master regulators of sexual functions in mammals. The hormone oxytocin has a well-established role in social bonding, sexual function, maternal instinct, nursing, and lactation. Researchers from Okayama University have now explored the roles of oxytocin in male sexual function for the first time. Findings from the study suggest that oxytocin-mediated control of male sexual function via the spinal cord may in fact be instrumental in treating erectile dysfunction. (2020-11-18)

Health care workers most at risk for COVID-19
Health care workers -- particularly nurses -- have a higher prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection than non-health care workers, according to researchers at Rutgers, which released baseline results from a large prospective study of participants at Rutgers and affiliated hospitals recruited during the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-11-16)

Media, NGO framing of climate change affects how people think about issue: studies
In a pair of studies, Hong Tien Vu of the University of Kansas found that the way media organizations and global climate change NGOs frame their messages on the topic does in fact influence how people look at the issue, which in turn affects what action, if any, is taken to fight the problem. (2020-11-16)

Are diagnostic imaging studies with positive conclusions or titles published faster?
According to the American Journal of Roentgenology, positive conclusions--but not titles--were associated with a shorter time from study completion to publication, which may contribute to an overrepresentation of positive results in the imaging diagnostic test accuracy (DTA) literature. Because an inflated perception of test performance could adversely influence clinical decision making and patient care, bias reduction strategies should undergo trials by both journal editors and researchers in the imaging DTA community. (2020-11-13)

Accuracy of rapid COVID test may be lower than previously suggested
The accuracy of a rapid finger-prick antibody test for SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for covid-19 infection, may be considerably lower than previously suggested, finds a study published by The BMJ. (2020-11-11)

Empathy and perspective taking: How social skills are built
Being able to feel empathy and to take in the other person's perspective are two abilities through which we understand what is going on in the other's mind. But it is still unclear what exactly they constitute. The Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences has now developed a model which explains what empathy and perspective taking are made of: It is not one specific competence rather than many individual factors that vary according to the situation. (2020-11-10)

Mindfulness interventions can change health behaviors -- integrated model helps to explain how they work
A growing body of evidence supports the effectiveness of mindfulness approaches to promote positive changes in health behaviors. New neurobiologically based models of ''mindful self-regulation'' help to explain the how mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) work to help people make healthy behavior changes, according to a review in the November/December issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. (2020-11-10)

it's not if, but how people use social media that impacts their well-being
New research from UBC Okanagan indicates what's most important for overall happiness is how a person uses social media. Derrick Wirtz, an associate professor of teaching in psychology at the Irving K. Barber Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, took a close look at how people use three major social platforms--Facebook, Twitter and Instagram--and how that use can impact a person's overall well-being. (2020-11-02)

Boosting the capacity of supercapacitors
Carefully designed covalent organic frameworks could make supercapacitor electrodes that have a greater ability to store electric charge. (2020-11-01)

Positive outlook predicts less memory decline
The happier we feel, the less likely we are to experience memory decline. (2020-10-29)

High rate of symptomless COVID-19 infection among grocery store workers
Grocery store employees are likely to be at heightened risk of COVID-19 infection, with those in customer-facing roles 5 times as likely to test positive as their colleagues in other positions, suggests the first study of its kind, published in the journal Occupational & Environmental Medicine. (2020-10-29)

Study of COVID-19 levels in oncology staff suggests need for more extensive testing
A study of oncology staff carried out immediately after the spring peak of the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK indicates that many had been infected with the coronavirus as they tested positive for COVID-19 antibodies. This included staff who did not show any symptoms. (2020-10-29)

Close to 17 percent of patients recovered from COVID-19 could still carry virus
A new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier, presents new data that address important questions pertaining to the containment of the coronavirus pandemic: When should COVID-19 quarantine really end and which continuing symptoms may be more indicative of a positive test in recovered patients? Investigators report that close to 17 percent of patients considered fully recovered from COVID-19 tested positive for the virus in follow-up screening. (2020-10-28)

Brazilian youth's important role in fight against climate change - study
Marginalised young people in Brazilian cities can play an important role in responding to the threat of climate change, but youth engagement needs to be both 'playful' and take youth 'seriously' to support them in expressing their full potential in bringing about local change according to a new study. (2020-10-26)

Keeping the spark lit into the golden years
Have you passed your supposed prime and feel like it takes more to get fired up? The good news is you're far from alone. And you can do something about it. (2020-10-23)

Research shows aging chimps, like humans, value friendships
Chimpanzee and human friendships show many parallels, according to new research published this week in Science by associate professor Martin Muller at The University of New Mexico Anthropology department, associate professor of Anthropology and co-director of the Comparative Human and Primate Physiology Center Melissa Emery Thompson, and their colleagues. (2020-10-22)

Mass screening method could slash COVID-19 testing costs, trial finds
Using a new mathematical approach to screen large groups for COVID-19 could be around 20 times cheaper than individual testing, a study suggests. (2020-10-21)

Hot-button words trigger conservatives and liberals differently
Researchers have linked a brain region to what they call neural polarization, offering a glimpse into the partisan brain in the weeks leading up to what is arguably the most consequential U.S. presidential election in modern history. (2020-10-20)

Hesitancy about a COVID-19 vaccine is linked to beliefs about origin of the virus
More than a third of people (34%) in Turkey and one sixth of people (17%) in the UK are 'hesitant' about a COVID-19 vaccine, according to a study by UCL and Dokuz Eylul University in Turkey. (2020-10-19)

Newborn brains lack maturity to process emotions as adults do
Humans aren't born with mature brain circuitry that attaches emotions to the things they see or hear in their environment, a new study shows. Researchers studying brain scans of newborns found that the part of the brain involved in experiencing emotions isn't functionally connected in a mature way with the regions that process visual or auditory stimuli. (2020-10-19)

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