Current Posture News and Events

Current Posture News and Events, Posture News Articles.
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Dragonflies perform upside down backflips to right themselves
High speed cameras and CGI technology have revealed the inbuilt righting mechanisms used by dragonflies when they are thrown off balance. (2021-02-09)

DeepLabCut-Live! real-time marker-less motion capture for animals
Behavioral scientists at EPFL introduce DeepLabCut-Live!, a deep-learning tool that can enable real-time feedback studies on animal movement and posture. The software features 'maker-less' real-time motion capture, can interface with lab hardware for neurological analysis, and is now available open source for use by researchers. (2020-12-09)

Archaeology: Neanderthal thumbs better adapted to holding tools with handles
Neanderthal thumbs were better adapted to holding tools in the same way that we hold a hammer, according to a paper published in Scientific Reports. (2020-11-26)

Robotic trunk support trainer improves upper body control of children with cerebral palsy
Columbia Engineering researchers report their innovative robotic Trunk Support Trainer, when combined with active practice of postural movements, improves trunk and reaching control in CP children with impaired sitting control. TruST helps physical therapists to not only support the children in the region of the trunk where they suffer from weakness and incoordination but also challenge them to perform rehabilitation tasks outside their base of support to improve their movement and coordination. (2020-10-22)

World's greatest mass extinction triggered switch to warm-bloodedness
Mammals and birds today are warm-blooded, and this is often taken as the reason for their great success. (2020-10-16)

Machine learning predicts how long museum visitors will engage with exhibits
In a proof-of-concept study, education and artificial intelligence researchers have demonstrated the use of a machine-learning model to predict how long individual museum visitors will engage with a given exhibit. The finding opens the door to a host of new work on improving user engagement with informal learning tools. (2020-10-13)

RUDN University linguist: learning foreign language is harder for visually impaired people
A scientist from RUDN University analysed the effect of visual impairment on a person's perception of unfamiliar sounds when learning a foreign language. The experiment showed that lack of access to visual cues makes learning difficult. (2020-10-06)

Computational study of famous fossil reveals evolution of locomotion in 'ruling reptiles'
Scientists from the University of Bristol and the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) used three-dimensional computer modelling to investigate the hindlimb of Euparkeria capensis-a small reptile that lived in the Triassic Period 245 million years ago-and inferred that it had a ''mosaic'' of functions in locomotion. (2020-09-21)

Monitoring sleep positions for a healthy rest
MIT researchers have developed a wireless, private way to monitor a person's sleep postures -- whether snoozing on their back, stomach, or sides -- using reflected radio signals from a small device mounted on a bedroom wall. (2020-09-10)

Simple test helps to predict and prevent falls
Scientists have developed a simple clinical test that can assess the lower limb strength of patients to predict their risk of falls. The ''enhanced paper grip test'' validated by researchers from the Centre for Biomechanics and Rehabilitation Technologies (CBRT) at Staffordshire University involves pulling a small card from underneath the participant's foot while asking them to grip with their big toe (Hallux). (2020-07-20)

3D hand-sensing wristband signals future of wearable tech
In a potential breakthrough in wearable sensing technology, researchers from Cornell University and the University of Wisconsin, Madison, have designed a wrist-mounted device that continuously tracks the entire human hand in 3D. (2020-07-20)

Lifting weights makes your nervous system stronger, too
Gym-goers may get frustrated when they don't see results from weightlifting right away, but their efforts are not in vain: the first few weeks of training strengthen the nervous system, not muscles. New research published in JNeurosci reveals how. (2020-06-29)

3D printed insoles offers new hope for patients with diabetes
Scientists from Staffordshire University claim that new 3D printed insoles can significantly improve the foot health of people suffering with diabetes. (2020-06-25)

New discovery of giant bipedal crocodile footprints in the cretaceous of Korea
A new study has announced the surprising discovery of well-preserved footprints belonging to a large bipedal ancestor of modern-day crocodiles. Before this discovery, crocodile ancestors that were more adapted to life on land were believed to be smaller animals that walked on all fours. (2020-06-11)

Insight into protein misfolding could open up new approaches to treat Parkinson's disease
Researchers have uncovered a link between the structure of the protein alpha-synuclein and its likelihood to misfold and aggregate. (2020-06-04)

The evolutionary puzzle of the mammalian ear
How could the tiny parts of the ear adapt independently to the diverse functional and environmental regimes encountered in mammals? A group of researchers from the University of Vienna and the Konrad Lorenz Institute for Evolution and Cognition Research proposed a new explanation for this puzzle. They suggest that the incorporation of the bones of the primary jaw joint into the ear has considerably increased the genetic, regulatory, and developmental complexity of the mammalian ear. (2020-05-27)

Study on body posture: Can powerful poses improve self-confidence in children?
A dominant body posture may help children to feel more confident in school. These are the findings of a new study by psychologists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg and the Otto Friedrich University of Bamberg. The study was recently published in the journal 'School Psychology International' and provides initial evidence that simple poses can help students feel better at school. (2020-05-18)

Do democracies behave differently from non-democracies when it comes to foreign policy?
The question of whether democracies behave differently from non-democracies is a central, and intense, debate in the field of international relations. Two intellectual traditions -- liberalism and realism -- dominate. Liberals argue that democracies do indeed behave differently, while realists insist that regime type and ideology are of little relevance in understanding foreign policy behavior. Arman Grigoryan, a faculty member in the Department of International Relations at Lehigh University has contributed to this debate with a recent article in a top journal, International Security. (2020-05-12)

Study finds that Pilates significantly improves blood pressure in young, obese women
A new paper in the American Journal of Hypertension, published by Oxford University Press, finds that mat Pilates may be an effective strategy to improve cardiovascular health for young obese women, a population that is at risk for hypertension and early vascular complications. (2020-04-01)

Research identifies regular climbing behavior in a human ancestor
A new study led by the University of Kent has found evidence that human ancestors as recent as two million years ago may have regularly climbed trees. (2020-03-30)

Vibes before it bites: 10 types of defensive behaviour for the false coral snake
The False Coral Snake (Oxyrhopus rhombifer) may be capable of recognising various threat levels and demonstrates ten different defensive behaviours, seven of which are registered for the first time for the species. Scientists from the Federal University of Viçosa (Brazil) published their laboratory observation results based on a juvenile specimen in the open-access journal Neotropical Biology and Conservation. (2020-03-23)

Keeping lower back pain at bay: Exercises designed by Lithuanians are 3 times more efficient
Lithuanian scientists have devised a spinal stabilization exercise program for managing lower back pain for people who perform a sedentary job. After testing the program with 70 volunteers, the researchers have found that the exercises are not only efficient in diminishing the non-specific lower back pain, but their effect lasts 3 times longer than that of a usual muscle strengthening exercise program. (2020-03-23)

Monty Python's silly walk: A gait analysis and wake-up call to peer review inefficiencies
Fifty years ago, Monty Python's famous sketch, 'The Ministry of Silly Walks,' first aired. The sketch pokes fun at the inefficiency of government bureaucracy. It opens with the Minister (John Cleese) walks in a rather unusual manner to his work, the Ministry of Silly Walks, where Mr. Pudey (Michael Palin) is waiting for him. Based on a gait analysis, a Dartmouth research team finds that the Minister's silly walk is 6.7 times more variable than a normal walk. (2020-03-12)

Study finds picking up a pingpong paddle may benefit people with Parkinson's
Pingpong may hold promise as a possible form of physical therapy for Parkinson's disease. People with Parkinson's who participated in a pingpong exercise program once a week for six months showed improvement in their Parkinson's symptoms, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 72nd Annual Meeting in Toronto, Canada, April 25 to May 1, 2020. (2020-02-25)

USU herpetologist reports surprising evolutionary shift in snakes
A multi-national team of scientists reports a case of a vertebrate predator switching from a vertebrate prey to an invertebrate prey for the selective advantage of obtaining the same chemical class of defensive toxins. (2020-02-24)

More autonomy at work reduces the risk of low back pain
A team of psychologists from Technische Universität Dresden, in cooperation with experts from health sciences and the Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, has carried out a meta-analysis to identify psychosocial work factors that pose a risk for the development of chronic low back pain (CLBP). Their study clearly indicates that not only physical but also psychological and social factors exert considerable influence on the development of the disease. (2020-01-23)

From as young as 4, children see males as more powerful than females
As early as 4 years old, children associate power and masculinity, even in countries considered to be more egalitarian like Norway. This is what scientists at the Institut des Sciences Cognitives Marc Jeannerod (CNRS/UCBL1) report, in collaboration with the universities of Oslo (Norway), Lausanne and Neuchâtel (Switzerland), in a study published on Jan. 7, 2020, in Sex Roles. They also show that in some situations the power-masculinity association does not manifest in girls. (2020-01-09)

Robotic trunk support assists those with spinal cord injury
A Columbia Engineering team has invented a robotic device -- the Trunk-Support Trainer (TruST) -- that can be used to assist and train people with spinal cord injuries (SCIs) to sit more stably by improving their trunk control, and thus gain an expanded active sitting workspace without falling over or using their hands to balance. The study is the first to measure and define the sitting workspace of patients with SCI based on their active trunk control. (2020-01-05)

How a penalty shootout is decided in the brain
Decision-making is controlled by different nerve cells. (2019-12-09)

How people trick themselves into thinking something is heavier than it really is
In a recent study published in PLOS One researchers from Hiroshima University and Nagoya Institute of Technology found that if you hold your car steering wheel at certain angles (1, 4, or 5 on the clock) then it's likely you're over or underestimating how much force you need to use to steer the car. (2019-11-20)

Body language key to zoo animal welfare
Watching the behavior and body language of zoo animals could be the key to understanding and improving their welfare, new research suggests. (2019-11-13)

EduSense: Like a FitBit for your teaching skills
While training and feedback opportunities abound for K-12 educators, the same can't be said for instructors in higher education. Currently, the most effective mechanism for professional development is for an expert to observe a lecture and provide personalized feedback. But a new system developed by Carnegie Mellon University researchers offers a comprehensive real-time sensing system that is inexpensive and scalable to create a continuous feedback loop for the instructor. (2019-11-06)

Survey finds less than 1/2 of Americans concerned about poor posture
The average American adult spends more than three and a half hours looking down at their smartphones every day. Looking down or slouching for long periods of time can not only cause chronic pain in the back, neck and knees, but it can lead to more serious health issues like circulation problems, heartburn and digestive issues if left unchecked. However, a new national survey by Orlando Health finds that too few Americans are concerned with the health effects of bad posture. (2019-10-09)

New method improves measurement of animal behaviour using deep learning
Konstanz researchers develop deep learning toolkit for high-speed measurement of body posture in animals. (2019-10-01)

No evidence that power posing works
Striking a power pose before an important meeting or interview is not going to boost your confidence or make you feel more powerful, says an Iowa State University researcher. Marcus Credé, an associate professor of psychology, reviewed nearly 40 studies on the topic and found not a single one supports the claims that power posing works. (2019-10-01)

Introducing 'phyjama,' a physiological-sensing pajama
Scientists expect that in the future, electronically active garments containing unobtrusive, portable devices for monitoring heart rate and respiratory rhythm during sleep, for example, will prove clinically useful in health care. Now researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have developed physiological-sensing textiles that can be woven or stitched into sleep garments they have dubbed 'phyjamas.' (2019-09-12)

Sex and height might influence neck posture when viewing electronic handheld devices
Sex and height appear to influence how people flex their neck when viewing handheld devices, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Arkansas. (2019-09-04)

Eliminating visual stimulation may help counter symptoms of spatial neglect after stroke
'We documented that while the patient was blindfolded, she sat up straighter, and her posture was more centered,' said Dr. Chen. Further research is needed to investigate the usefulness of this type of intervention in rehabilitative care. 'It is important to look at ways to support upright and centered posture in our patients recovering from stroke,' Chen noted, 'because posture and positioning are essential to participating in many therapies and in performing activities of daily life.' (2019-08-30)

Dinosaur brains from baby to adult
New research by a University of Bristol palaeontology post-graduate student has revealed fresh insights into how the braincase of the dinosaur Psittacosaurus developed and how this tells us about its posture. (2019-08-15)

Robotic neck brace dramatically improves functions of ALS patients
A Columbia Engineering-designed robotic brace that supports the neck during its natural motion is the first device shown to dramatically assist ALS patients in holding their heads and actively supporting them during range of motion. The brace should improve patients' quality of life, not only in improving eye contact during conversation, but also in facilitating the use of eyes as a joystick to control movements on a computer, much as scientist Stephen Hawkins did. (2019-08-12)

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