Current Potatoes News and Events

Current Potatoes News and Events, Potatoes News Articles.
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Wolves, dogs and dingoes, oh my
Dogs are generally considered the first domesticated animal, while its ancestor is generally considered to be the wolf, but where the Australian dingo fits into this framework is still debated, according to a retired Penn State anthropologist. (2021-02-17)

Cataloguing genetic information about yams
New collection of resources will help yam breeders and farmers. (2021-02-10)

Fried food intake linked to heightened serious heart disease and stroke risk
Fried-food intake is linked to a heightened risk of major heart disease and stroke, finds a pooled analysis of the available research data, published online in the journal Heart. (2021-01-18)

Surprising trove of sorghum diversity discovered in Australia -- but it's disappearing fast
New research found that wild cousins of sorghum, the fifth-most important cereal crop globally, are most concentrated in Australia, despite having been domesticated in Africa. But with 12 of the total 23 wild relative species possibly endangered, four vulnerable, and four near threatened, these economically important wild plants are in peril. (2020-11-30)

People with type 2 diabetes need not avoid eating potatoes based on glycemic index
People with type 2 Diabetes (T2D) are frequently told to avoid eating potatoes, and other high Glycemic Index (GI) foods, because of the longstanding perception that these foods make it difficult to control blood sugar levels. However, for the first time, a rigorously controlled clinical trial, including 24 adults with T2D, demonstrates that GI is not an accurate surrogate for an individual's glycemic response (GR) to a food consumed as part of an evening meal. (2020-10-26)

Researchers find new way to protect plants from fungal infection
Widespread fungal disease in plants can be controlled with a commercially available chemical that has been primarily used in medicine until now. This discovery was made by scientists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the University of the State of Paraná in Brazil. In a comprehensive experiment the team has uncovered a new metabolic pathway that can be disrupted with this chemical, thus preventing many known plant fungi from invading the host plant. (2020-09-22)

Unlocking the secrets of plant genomes in high resolution
Resolving genomes, particularly plant genomes, is a very complex and error-prone task. This is because there are several copies of all of the chromosomes and they are very alike. A team of bioinformatics researchers from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) has now developed a software tool that allows for precise assignment to the correct copies - a process known as 'phasing'. They present their development in the latest online edition of the journal Genome Biology. (2020-09-21)

Discovered: New resistance gene to devastating potato disease that caused Irish Famine
In a recent collaboration between the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences and the James Hutton institute, scientists identified a diploid wild potato with a high resistance to Phytophthora infestans. They discovered novel R genes in this potato using dRenSeq analysis, and further transcriptional analysis revealed the essential role of multiple signal transduction pathways and secondary metabolic pathways in plant immunity in the wild potato. (2020-09-21)

How soft hair deforms the sharpest steel blades
Why do the edges of a steel razor dull from cutting far softer materials? (2020-08-06)

Bees' buzz is more powerful for pollination, than for defence or flight
Buzzing by bees during flower pollination is significantly more powerful than that used for defense or flight, according to a new study from experts at the University of Stirling. (2020-07-29)

New recommendations: People with high cholesterol should eliminate carbs, not saturated fat
An international team of experts on heart disease and diet say there's no evidence that a low-saturated fat diet reduces cholesterol in people with familial hypercholesterolemia. (2020-07-06)

Potato power: Spuds serve high quality protein that's good for women's muscle
Researchers from McMaster University have found that the potato, primarily known as a starchy vegetable, can be a source of high-quality protein that helps to maintain muscle. (2020-05-05)

Sweet potato microbiome research important first step towards improving yield
Despite the importance of sweet potato, little is known about the sweet potato microbiome. ;A plant's microbiome profoundly impacts its health and development,' explains Brooke Bissinger, an entomologist who recently published a study on sweet potatoes in Phytobiomes Journal. 'We sought to better understand the sweet potato microbiomes by characterizing it within and between actual working farms.' (2020-04-22)

Which foods do you eat together? How you combine them may raise dementia risk
It's no secret that a healthy diet may benefit the brain. However, it may not only be what foods you eat, but what foods you eat together that may be associated with your risk of dementia, according to a new study published in the April 22, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2020-04-22)

Traditional vegetable diet lowers the risk of premature babies
It turns out we should follow our parent' advice when we're thinking about becoming parents ourselves, with a study finding eating the traditional 'three-vegies' before pregnancy lowers the risk of a premature birth. (2020-04-14)

Arduous farm labor in the past means longer working hours today
A new study in The Economic Journal finds that societies with a history of farming crops heavily reliant on labor effort prefer harder work and longer hours. (2020-04-14)

New technology helps reduce salt, keep flavor
A new processing technology out of Washington State University called microwave assisted thermal sterilization (MATS) could make it possible to reduce sodium while maintaining safety and tastiness. (2020-03-03)

Potato plants at highest risk of potato virus Y infection during first three weeks
Potato virus Y is the most economically important and devastating aphid-transmitted virus, affecting both tuber yield and quality. The virus is also a major cause of seed potato degeneration, which leads to regular flushing out of seed potatoes after limited field production cycles. There is no remedy for this virus and once a plant becomes infected, it stays sick for life. (2020-02-17)

Are all sources of carbohydrates created equal?
Potatoes are often equated with refined grains due to their carbohydrate content. Yet, potatoes contain fiber, resistant starch, and micronutrients that Americans need more of. A randomized crossover study that included 50 generally healthy adults directly compared the nutrient quality and impact on cardiometabolic risk factors of non-fried potatoes to refined grains. Its findings demonstrate that potatoes did not affect markers of glycemia and was associated with better diet quality compared to refined grains. (2020-02-13)

Climate change to create farmland in the north, but at environmental costs, study reveals
Areas that may become suitable for crops cover an area equal to more than 30 per cent of the landmass already being farmed worldwide. More than half of that landmass lies in Canada (4.2 million square kilometres) and Russia (4.3 million square kilometres). However, if these areas became farmland about 177 gigatonnes of carbon would be released from soils, biodiversity would be threatened in Central America and northern Andes and water quality degraded. (2020-02-12)

Crop management study recommends 3-year rotations for potato production systems
Building and maintaining soil health is essential to agricultural sustainability, long-term productivity, and economic viability. Soil health is defined as the continued capacity of soil to function as a vital living system that supports biological productivity, to maintain environmental quality, and to promote plant, animal, and human health. (2020-01-03)

Earliest evidence for rhizomes roasting in Africa 170 thousand years ago
The 170,000-year-old charred remains of starchy plant parts from Border Cave, South Africa provides the earliest direct evidence for the collecting and cooking of carbohydrate-rich rhizomes, a new study reports. (2020-01-02)

New tool to detect blackleg disease in potato has widespread application
'We hope Uniqprimer and the tests it designed will aid in the accurate detection of D. dianthicola and many other pathogens,' said lead author Shaista Karim. 'Accurate pathogen detection is the first step for management of a disease, which helps in reducing the losses in the potato industry and informing the farmers in a timely manner to better aid on-farm decision making.' (2019-12-05)

Sweet potato uses a single odor to warn its neighbors of insect attack
A single volatile substance can be sufficient to induce a defense response in sweet potatoes to herbivores. Researchers have identified this substance and shown that the mechanism is not only limited to the attacked plant itself but also alerts unaffected neighboring plants to defend themselves against attackers. This response is specific and not observed in every sweet potato cultivar. The results of the study are of interest for breeding resistant sweet potato cultivars. (2019-12-02)

In the war on emerging crop diseases, scientists develop new 'War Room' simulations
This research evaluated the important sellers and villages in the Gulu region of Uganda, analyzing their potential role for spreading disease and distributing improved varieties of seed. The researchers used this data for 'War Room' style simulation analyses that highlighted the potential paths that a pathogen could take in advance of its spread. (2019-11-21)

Potato virus Y is the most serious threat to potato -- some strains more than others
Potato virus Y (PVY) is the most serious problem facing the potato industry in the United States and is the main cause for rejection of seed potato lots. The virus affects potatoes in two ways: It reduces the yield of potato tubers by 70-80% and also negatively affects the quality of the remaining tubers due to necrotic reactions. During the last 10 years, major changes have been observed in the prevalence of different strains. (2019-11-18)

Study: After trade deal, unhealthy foods flowed into Central America, Dominican Republic
The study analyzes the availability of non-nutritious food in Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic in the years after the Dominican Republic-Central America Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR) was signed between those countries and the US, going into effect in 2006. (2019-11-13)

Potato as effective as carbohydrate gels for boosting athletic performance, study finds
Consuming potato puree during prolonged exercise works just as well as a commercial carbohydrate gel in sustaining blood glucose levels and boosting performance in trained athletes, scientists report. (2019-10-18)

Cooking food alters the microbiome
Scientists at UC San Francisco and Harvard University have shown for the first time that cooking food fundamentally alters the microbiomes of both mice and humans, a finding with implications both for optimizing our microbial health and for understanding how cooking may have altered the evolution of the our microbiomes during human prehistory. (2019-09-30)

New research reveals soil microbes play a key role in plant disease resistance
Scientists have discovered that soil microbes can make plants more resistant to an aggressive disease -- opening new possibilities for sustainable food production. (2019-09-25)

Following a healthy plant-based diet may lower type 2 diabetes risk
Greater adherence to predominantly plant-based diets was associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes compared to lower adherence to these diets. (2019-07-22)

Unearthing the sweet potato proteome
The sweet, starchy orange sweet potatoes are tasty and nutritious ingredients for fries, casseroles and pies. Although humans have been cultivating sweet potatoes for thousands of years, scientists still don't know much about the protein makeup of these tubers. In ACS' Journal of Proteome Research, researchers have analyzed the proteome of sweet potato leaves and roots, and in the process, have revealed new insights into the plant's genome. (2019-06-19)

You are what you eat: How the pursuit of carbs changed mammals' genes and saliva
A study of dozens of mammal species explores the evolutionary history of amylase, a compound that breaks down carbs. (2019-05-14)

How potatoes could become sun worshippers
If the temperature is too high, potato plants form significantly lower numbers of tubers. Biochemists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg have now discovered the reason why. If the temperature rises, a so-called small RNA blocks the formation of tubers. The scientists have now successfully switched off this small RNA and have produced potato plants that are more resistant to high temperatures, which is an important contribution to securing crop yields in the future in view of climate change. (2019-05-14)

Analysis of historical specimens determines single origin of Australian potato pest
In a recently published study, Jacqueline Edwards and colleagues used the PCN cyst reference collection held by Crop Health Services, Agriculture Victoria, to examine the genetic variability of Victorian PCN populations. They discovered very little differentiation between the distinct PCN populations, suggesting a single localized introduction into Victoria followed by limited spread to nearby areas. They also discovered that Australian PCN appears genetically distinct from previous populations sampled worldwide. (2019-05-08)

New variety of zebra chip disease threatens potato production in southwestern Oregon
Named after the dark stripes that form inside potatoes after they are cut and fried, zebra chip disease is a potentially devastating affliction that can result in yield losses up to 100% for farmers. Swisher et al. identified a new haplotype, designated haplotype F, that causes zebra chip symptoms in potato. Prior to this discovery, 'only haplotypes A and B were known to cause zebra chip symptoms in potato,' explains Swisher. (2019-04-18)

Canadians' consumption of fruit and vegetables drops 13 per cent in 11 years
Two surveys taken 11 years apart show a 13-per-cent decrease in the amount of fruit and vegetables being consumed by Canadians, new University of British Columbia research has found. And while consumption of milk and dairy products also declined during the study period between 2004 and 2015, Canadians were eating more meat and alternatives in 2015 than they were a decade earlier. (2019-03-08)

New insights into radial expansion of plants can boost biomass production
Besides the obvious longitudinal growth, plants also enlarge in the radial sense. This thickening of plant stems and roots provides physical support to plants, provides us with wood and cork, and plays a major role in sequestering atmospheric carbon into plant biomass. The tissues responsible for this radial expansion are the vascular tissues which transport water and nutrients around plants and are visible as concentric circles in tree trunks known as annual growth rings. (2019-02-08)

Technology use explains at most 0.4 percent of adolescent wellbeing, new study finds
Study finds only 0.4 percent of wellbeing in adolescents is associated with technology use. Most definitive study to date, using data from 300,000 adolescents and parents in the UK and USA Comparatively, eating potatoes has nearly as negative effect and wearing glasses has a more negative effect on adolescent mental health then screen use. Novel methodology to remove bias from data analysis revealed that problems in data analysis choice and selective reporting is a 'endemic' problem in technology research (2019-01-14)

Study finds four dried fruits have lower glycemic index (GI) than white bread
People with diabetes and followers of diets based on the glycemic index (GI) can enjoy dried fruits knowing they do not cause a blood sugar spike compared to starchy foods such as white bread, suggests a study published in the journal Nutrition and Diabetes. (2018-12-10)

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