Current Poverty News and Events

Current Poverty News and Events, Poverty News Articles.
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Families have high awareness of healthy eating but struggle to access good food
Low-income families have a high awareness of healthy diets but can't afford good quality and nutritious food, new research shows. (2021-02-23)

Toddler sleep patterns matter
Lauren Covington, an assistant professor in the University of Delaware School of Nursing, found that children with inconsistent sleep schedules have higher body mass index (BMI) percentiles. Her research also found that children from households with greater poverty had more overall inconsistent sleep onset times. But for families living in poverty, consistent bedtime scheduling may not be easily done, especially if a caregiver is the only parent, juggling multiple jobs, parenting multiple children or dealing with a tenuous housing situation. (2021-02-22)

'Left behind' adolescent women must be prioritised within sustainable development agenda
The needs of millions of overlooked, 'left behind' adolescent women must become a more significant priority within international efforts to end poverty by 2030, a UK Government-commissioned report is urging. (2021-02-10)

Children's finger length points to mothers' income level
Low-income mothers feminize their children in the womb by adjusting their hormones, whereas high-income mothers masculinize their children, a major study based on finger length, led by a Swansea University expert, has found. The phenomenon is an unconscious evolutionary response aimed at boosting their offspring's chances of successful reproduction. It helps, in part, explain associations between low income, low levels of testosterone before birth, and major causes of mortality such as cardiovascular disease. (2021-02-09)

New study shows pandemic's toll on jobs, businesses, and food security in poorer countries
The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic caused a sharp decline in living standards and rising food insecurity in low- and middle-income across the globe, according to a new study published Feb. 5 in the journal Science Advances. Using data collected between April-July 2020 in Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Colombia, Ghana, Kenya, Nepal, Philippines, Rwanda, and Sierra Leone, researchers found drops in employment, income, and access to markets and services, translating into high levels of food insecurity. (2021-02-05)

Experiences of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) linked to nutritional health
A study of factors associated with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) has led to a number of novel findings linking nutrition to experiences of PTSD. Notable among them is the discovery that Canadians, between the ages of 45 and 85, were less likely to exhibit PTSD if they consumed an average of two to three fiber sources daily. (2021-02-03)

1 in 10 college women experience period poverty, more likely to experience depression
New George Mason University study is first to examine unmet basic menstrual health needs, (often called 'period poverty') and associations with depression among college students. More than 14% of participants reported lack of access to menstrual products in the past year, and 10% reported period poverty every month. Women who experienced period poverty were more likely to report symptoms suggestive of moderate or severe depression. (2021-02-02)

Sliding life expectancy poses gender and inequity questions
Life expectancy gain is slowing in Australia - and figures show these figures are already sliding backwards in both the US and UK - yet little is being done by policy makers to understand specific gender and inequity reasons why this slip is occurring. (2021-01-22)

Climate change is hurting children's diets, global study finds
A first-of-its-kind, international study of 107,000 children finds that higher temperatures are an equal or even greater contributor to child malnutrition than the traditional culprits of poverty, inadequate sanitation, and poor education. The 19-nation study is the largest investigation to date of the relationship between our changing climate and children's diet diversity. Of the six regions examined--in Asia, Africa, and Central and South America--five had significant reductions in diet diversity associated with higher temperatures. (2021-01-14)

Latina mothers, often essential workers, report COVID-19 took toll
More than half of Latina mothers surveyed in Yolo and Sacramento counties reported making economic cutbacks in response to the pandemic shutdown last spring -- saying they bought less food and missed rent payments. Hardships were not reduced by stimulus checks. (2021-01-08)

UCI study first to link disparities and 'pharmacy deserts' in California
In the United States, Black, Latino and low-income communities have historically lacked nearby access to pharmacy services. To provide the first record of these 'pharmacy deserts' in Los Angeles County, a University of California, Irvine study identified communities where the nearest pharmacy was at least one mile away. (2021-01-06)

A third of U.S. families face a different kind of poverty
Before the pandemic, one-third of U.S. households with children were already ''net worth poor,'' lacking enough financial resources to sustain their families for three months at a poverty level, finds new research from Duke University. In 2019, 57 percent of Black families and 50 percent of Latino families with children were poor in terms of net worth. By comparison, the rate for White families was 24 percent. (2021-01-06)

Droughts, viruses and road networks: Trends that will impact our forests
A new UCPH study assembled an array of experts to highlight major trends that will impact the world's forests, and the people living around them, in the decade ahead. These trends include drought, viral outbreaks and vast infrastructure expansions across the globe. According to the researchers, a global strategy for human-nature interaction must be developed if we intend on ensuring the survival of both. (2020-12-22)

How the American child welfare system lost its way
Black children are removed from their families at much greater rates than any other race or ethnicity in this country. At the same time the sheer number of all child abuse investigations in the US is staggering: experts estimate that by age 18 one out of three children has been the subject of a child protective services investigation. Yet, many of these investigations and removals are unjustified, says University of Rochester health policy historian and physician Mical Raz. (2020-12-22)

'Poverty line' concept debunked by new machine learning model
Mathematicians have used machine learning to develop a new model for measuring poverty in different countries that junks old notions of a fixed 'poverty line'. (2020-12-18)

Low-income preschoolers exposed to nurturing care have with higher IQ scores later on
Preschoolers living in impoverished communities who have access to a nurturing home environment have significantly higher intelligence quotient (IQ) scores in adolescence compared to those raised without nurturing care. (2020-12-18)

New study measures neighborhood inequality and violence based on everyday mobility
A new study looking at the patterns of movement from 400,000 people offers fresh insights into how a neighborhood's economic conditions mixed with the mobility patterns of its residents and visitors relates to the well-being of the neighborhood and can serve as a predictor of violence. The theory argues that a neighborhood's well-being depends not only on its own socioeconomic conditions but on the conditions of the neighborhoods its residents visit and are visited by. (2020-12-17)

Poverty linked to higher risk of Covid-19 death, study suggests
People in the poorest areas are more likely to be affected by severe Covid-19 - and to die from the disease - than those in more affluent districts, according to a study of critical care units. (2020-12-15)

New research points to effective ways to increase support for addressing ec
Researchers have found that information about economic inequality focusing on the disadvantages facing people from the lower-socioeconomic class leads Americans to engage more with the issue and to express greater support for action to mitigate inequality. (2020-12-14)

Evaluating accumulating evidence of how poverty influences mental health, and how to intervene
Why are people who live in poverty disproportionately affected by mental illness? (2020-12-10)

Increase in head start funding 'a national priority'
Increased funding for Head Start -- the largest federally funded, early childhood development program in the United States -- is needed to support families during the COVID-19 recession and to ensure a more stable economic recovery. (2020-12-07)

Can gender inequality kill? Paper looks at impact among older Indian women
Indian women past childbearing age are dying at a higher rate than those in other countries because of poverty and limited access to resources such as food and health care, according to a study from Rice University, (2020-12-07)

LSU Health conducts first study on neighborhood deprivation and COVID in Louisiana
A study by researchers at LSU Health New Orleans School of Public Health, believed to be the first study to investigate the role of neighborhood deprivation on COVID-19 in Louisiana, found that the more a neighborhood is deprived, the higher the risk for cases of COVID-19. They report that people living in the most deprived neighborhoods had an almost 40% higher risk of COVID-19 compared to those residing in the least deprived neighborhoods. (2020-12-04)

Call for 'debt driving licence'
People borrowing money for the first time should only be given small amounts until they have proved their competence, a new study says. (2020-11-27)

Poverty and honesty are not opposites
Does poverty cause lying? An international research team led by behavioral economist Agne Kajackaite from the WZB Berlin Social Science Center, Suparee Boonmanunt (Mahidol University, Bangkok) and Stephan Meier (Columbia Business School) examined whether poverty-stricken individuals were especially prone to acts of dishonesty. The researchers ran a field experiment with rice farmers in Thailand which incentivized cheating during a card game. They found that poverty itself did not cause individuals to act dishonestly. (2020-11-27)

COVID-19 second wave in Myanmar causes dramatic increases in poverty
New evidence combining surveys from urban and rural Myanmar and simulation analysis find COVID-19 second wave dramatically increasing poverty and food insecurity. (2020-11-24)

Study shows geographic shift in U.S. social mobility
Social mobility differs considerably from country to country. The United States was once exceptional when it came to social mobility but is not anymore compared with other countries, like Canada, Ireland and Sweden. The landscape has shifted unevenly over the last century with some areas of the U.S. scoring high in social mobility and others scoring low, some persistently so. (2020-11-16)

Difficult to implement national corona restrictions in Malawi
Households need financial support if Covid-19 restrictions are to be successful in Malawi. Furthermore, the authorities issuing the restrictions have an additional bearing on their enforceability. These are findings from a new study examining the relationship between authorities and civil compliance in one of the world's poorest countries. (2020-11-12)

Teacher quality scores change depending on students, school, PSU study finds
School districts across the U.S. are increasingly using student test scores to rate the effectiveness of teachers, but a new Portland State University study found that the scores have less to do with individual teachers and more to do with their students and the schools. (2020-11-12)

Losing the American Dream
As many Americans struggle to pay their bills, keeping up with mortgage payments can be daunting with the risk of losing one's home. The challenges to retain a home are stratified along racial differences. Black homeowners are twice as likely to lose their homes and transition back to renting than white homeowners, according to a recent Dartmouth-led study published in Demography. African American owners exit their homes at a rate of 10 percent compared with whites' exit rate of five percent. (2020-11-11)

Global analysis of forest management shows local communities often lose out
Maintaining forest cover is an important natural climate solution, but new research shows that too often, communities lose out when local forest management is formalised. The new study published today in Nature Sustainability, led by Dr Johan Oldepkop at The University of Manchester and Reem Hajjar at Oregon State University, is based on 643 case studies of community forest management (CFM) in 51 different countries, from 267 peer-reviewed studies. (2020-11-09)

Palm oil certification brings mixed outcomes to neighbouring communities
Research led by the University of Kent's Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology (DICE) has found that Indonesian communities living near oil palm plantations are impacted in different ways, both positive and negative, during plantation development and certification. (2020-11-02)

Poverty linked to higher risk of death in children with cancer undergoing transplant
Despite the increasing use and promise of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) as curative therapy for children with cancer and other life-threatening diseases, new research suggests that children transplanted for cancer are more likely to die from treatment-related complications if they live in poorer neighborhoods. The study, published today in the journal Blood, also found that having Medicaid versus private insurance, another marker of poverty, was associated with a higher chance of dying. (2020-10-26)

Preventing lead poisoning at the source
Using a variety of public records, researchers from Case Western Reserve University examined every rental property in Cleveland from 2016-18 on factors related to the likelihood that the property could have lead-safety problems. (2020-10-22)

Fear of COVID-19 raises risk of depression among Soweto's deprived communities
A STUDY into the impact of the COVID-19 lockdown on the mental health of people in Soweto has found a significant link between symptoms of depression and how likely people felt they were to be infected. (2020-10-19)

New study: Forests are still underrated as allies to curb rural poverty
In the face of the Covid-19 pandemic and the mounting threat of climate change, forests and trees are vital for the rural poor in countries around the world. However, the poor are rarely able to capture the bulk of benefits from forests. A global science assessment analyses how forests can realize their potential to reduce poverty in a fair and lasting manner. (2020-10-15)

Clean and clear: How being more transparent over resources helps cut carbon emissions
Countries that sign up to improved financial transparency over oil, gas, and mining revenues benefit from significant reductions in carbon emissions, a new study by the University of Sussex Business School reveals. (2020-10-14)

Poor families must move often, but rarely escape concentrated poverty
Repeated unforeseen circumstances force low-income families to quickly move from one home to the next in a process that helps to perpetuate racial and economic segregation in the United States. Research offers possible policy fixes for helping families with housing vouchers move to high opportunity areas. (2020-10-08)

Women's incomes improve when democrats hold public office, study finds
New research from the University of California San Diego reveals that democratic control of state houses leads to substantial improvement in women's incomes, wages, and unemployment relative to men. (2020-10-08)

As pandemic affects children's health, programs that work are still underused
Evidence-based programs known to reverse the negative effects of poverty are being widely neglected, according to a new report in Health Affairs. (2020-10-05)

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