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Current Poverty News and Events, Poverty News Articles.
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Counties with persistent poverty rates experience higher rates of cancer deaths
Residents of counties that experience persistent poverty face a disproportionately high risk of cancer mortality. (2020-09-30)

Advancing the accurate tracking of energy poverty
IIASA researchers have developed a novel measurement framework to track energy poverty that better aligns with the services people lack rather than capturing the mere absence of physical connections to a source of electricity. This alternative framework can aid better tracking of Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 7 by virtue of its simplicity and sensitivity to the diversity in service conditions among the poor. (2020-09-21)

Vaccine narrows racial disparities in pneumococcal disease
In a major public health success, the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine PCV13, or Prevnar 13, in 2010 in the United States is associated with reduction in socioeconomic disparities and the near elimination of Black-white-based racial disparities for invasive pneumococcal disease. (2020-08-31)

Study shows socioeconomic status linked to heart failure mortality in United States
A variety of treatments exist to address heart failure, yet it continues to carry a poor prognosis. A new study from University Hospitals showed that a person's address can help predict their chance of mortality from heart disease. (2020-08-25)

Lockdowns have economic and social costs for world's poorest families
Low socioeconomic families - and particularly women - experienced increased financial hardship, food insecurity, domestic violence and mental health challenges during COVID-19 lockdown measures in Bangladesh, a new research study shows. In the first study of its kind, Australian and Bangladeshi researchers documented the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and associated lockdown measures on the wellbeing of women and their families in rural Bangladesh. (2020-08-25)

Study of one million Danish children: Childhood adversity increases the risk of early death
Social adversity in early childhood appears to be a significant risk factor for death in early adulthood. Children who have experienced repeated serious adversity such as losing a parent, mental illness in the family, poverty or being placed in foster care have a 4.5 times higher risk of dying in early adulthood than children who have not experienced adversity during childhood. This is the conclusion of a new large-scale study conducted at the University of Copenhagen. (2020-08-19)

Society perceives the poor as less affected by distress than those with more means
The poor are perceived to be less harmed by negative events than those with more means, even when this is patently false, according to a series of studies published by Princeton University. (2020-08-17)

In Iraq, mixed-religion soccer teams helped build social cohesion, healed wounds after war
A new study in Science used sports to promote reconciliation between Christians, who were displaced and persecuted under ISIS in Iraq, and their Muslim neighbors. Players who'd been randomly assigned to have Muslim players on their teams changed attitudes, which persisted even after the season ended. However, the changes only related to Muslim league players, and did not extend off the field. (2020-08-13)

Poverty alleviation efforts are shaping the success of environmental targets
Social protection programs can facilitate progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) but can also create trade-offs across divergent social and environmental goals that can undermine their effectiveness, say the authors of new research published in the journal PNAS. This is one of the largest studies on the sustainability implications of social protection, funded by the Grantham Centre for Sustainable Futures at The University of Sheffield. (2020-08-10)

Study: Most Americans don't have enough assets to withstand 3 months without income
A new study from Oregon State University found that 77% of low- to moderate-income American households fall below the asset poverty threshold, meaning that if their income were cut off they would not have the financial assets to maintain at least poverty-level status for three months. (2020-08-06)

Study: Experiencing childhood trauma makes body and brain age faster
Children who suffer trauma from abuse or violence early in life show biological signs of aging faster than children who have never experienced adversity, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. The study examined three different signs of biological aging -- early puberty, cellular aging and changes in brain structure -- and found that trauma exposure was associated with all three. (2020-08-03)

How global responses to COVID-19 threaten global food security
The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has forced nations worldwide to implement unprecedented social measures to stem the rapid spread of the virus. (2020-07-30)

Economic and food supply chain disruptions endanger global food security
COVID-19 has led to a global economic slowdown that is affecting all four pillars of food security - availability, access, utilization, and stability. The greatest threats are to food accessibility, due to income losses and disruptions in supply chains - particularly for more nutritious foods and the world's poor. (2020-07-30)

COVID-19 provides rare opportunities for studying natural and human systems
Researchers at Stanford and other institutions hypothesize outcomes of the pandemic's unprecedented socioeconomic disruption and outline research priorities for advancing our understanding of humans' impact on the environment Watch related video: https://youtu.be/jd9Jb6OInlM (2020-07-29)

New study finds racial disparities in COVID-19-related deaths exist beyond income differences in 10
New analyses by a team of researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine examine the interplay between race/ethnicity and income on COVID-19 cases and related deaths in 10 major US cities. (2020-07-28)

Calcium and vitamin D nutrient deficiencies lead to higher risk for osteoporosis
Research article in the journal PLoS ONE examines inadequate nutrient intake and its relationship to poor bone health, specifically risk of osteoporosis. The research was a cross sectional analysis of the U.S population from NHANES. (2020-07-28)

New measure of social determinants of health may improve cardiovascular health assessment
The authors of this study developed a single risk score derived from multiple social determinants of health that predicts county-level cardiovascular disease mortality. The authors conclude that their multivariable SDoH risk score can identify counties with high CVD risk and has the potential to improve CVD risk prediction and interventions for vulnerable populations at the county level. (2020-07-14)

Report calls for government to 'level up' Stoke-on-Trent economy
Stoke-on-Trent faces an increased threat of poverty and destitution due to the COVID-19 crisis, a new report reveals. The research has been carried out by Staffordshire University Business School for the Stoke-on-Trent Hardship Commission and highlights the considerable work to be still done by central government to 'level-up' the Stoke-on-Trent economy. (2020-07-14)

Study: Medicaid expansion meant better health for the most vulnerable low-income adults
The most vulnerable residents of the nation's 10th most populous state say their health improved significantly after they enrolled in Michigan's expanded Medicaid program, a new study finds. Michiganders with extremely low incomes, those with multiple chronic health problems, and those who are Black, got the biggest health boosts year over year among enrollees in the safety-net health coverage program. But participants of almost all ages, backgrounds and geographic regions reported improvements in health. (2020-07-10)

Targeted taxes and school lunch policies benefit low-income populations
Targeted taxes on sweetened beverages and policies that strengthen nutritional standards for meals and beverages at schools may be effective tools for decreasing the purchase of sweetened drinks and reducing obesity among children living in poverty, according to two studies led by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. (2020-07-07)

Association between morbidity and poverty reversed during early US COVID-19 epidemic
In the US, counties with greater poverty, lower social mobility and life expectancy had more confirmed cases in January through March, but this trend reversed by April 1, while a higher death rate from COVID-19 remained associated with poverty throughout. These results suggest that limited testing resources may have been diverted to richer counties as the epidemic took hold. (2020-06-17)

Cash me outside: Transfers to the poor linked to eco-benefits
In a new study, researchers recently discovered that Indonesia's national anti-poverty program reduced deforestation by about 30%. (2020-06-12)

Better reading proficiency linked to fewer youth homicides
A good education system has long been linked with providing opportunity for people to get better jobs and escape poverty. However, less is known about the impact of education on youth violence. (2020-06-11)

National Autism Indicators Report: the connection between autism and financial hardship
A.J. Drexel Autism Institute released the 2020 National Autism Indicators Report highlighting the financial challenges facing households of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), including higher levels of poverty, material hardship and medical expenses. (2020-06-10)

Look to precision public health to address the perfect storm fueling COVID-19 mortality
The interaction of COVID-19 with co-existing non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is a perfect storm, particularly for communities of poverty. While primarily targeting the elderly, NCDs and underlying metabolic conditions- obesity, hypertension, kidney disease, and diabetes in younger people, are all associated with higher risk of severe illness, hospitalization and death from COVID-19. As COVID-19 continues to spread, It is not too late to address the underlying drivers of morbidity and mortality - and focus prevention efforts on people suffering from NCDs. (2020-06-10)

Air conditioner bumps the electric bill by 42%, increasing the risk of energy poverty
A new study by Ca' Foscari and CMCC combines OECD and NASA datasets for 8 countries to show that the share of households' spending dedicated to cooling is greater to what estimated in previous studies (2020-06-05)

Climate change increases migration at the expense of the poor
A climate game developed by Max Planck researchers shows that global cooperation can be possible -- although not without effort. (2020-05-26)

Countering COVID-19 impacts on children from low-income households
The COVID-19 pandemic has magnified the social, educational and health care disparities already plaguing the nearly 40 million Americans the US Census Bureau estimates are living in poverty. Perhaps the hardest hit members of that population, say three pediatricians at Johns Hopkins Children's Center and Children's National Hospital, are children from low-income households. (2020-05-26)

Sustainable palm oil? How environmental protection and poverty reduction can be reconciled
Palm oil is often associated with tropical deforestation above all else. However, this is only one side of the story, as agricultural scientists from the University of Göttingen and the IPB University Bogor (Indonesia) show in a new study. The rapid expansion of oil palm has also contributed considerably to economic growth and poverty reduction in local communities, particularly in Asia. The study was published in the Annual Review of Resource Economics. (2020-05-19)

Stark disparities in COVID-19 hospitalization and death rates among New York
Researchers found that COVID-19 hospitalization and death rates varied across New York City boroughs. The Bronx -- with the highest proportion of racial/ethnic minorities, the most poverty, and lowest educational attainment -- had higher rates of hospitalization and death related to COVID-19 than all other boroughs. These rates were lowest in affluent Manhattan, comprised of a predominately white population. COVID-19 deaths per 100,000 persons was nearly two times greater in the Bronx than in Manhattan. (2020-04-29)

Extra payments motivate sobriety and employment among people recovering from addiction
After a yearlong study of people with opioid dependence, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers report evidence that adding $8 an hour to their paychecks may help those in recovery stay drug free longer, as well as encourage them to get and hold regular jobs. (2020-04-20)

If you're poor, poverty is an environmental issue
A survey from Cornell researchers -- conducted among more than 1,100 US residents -- found that there were, in fact, demographic differences in how people viewed environmental issues, with racial and ethnic minorities and lower-income people more likely to consider human factors such as racism and poverty as environmental, in addition to more ecological issues like toxic fumes from factories or car exhaust. (2020-03-16)

SFU research uses simulation game to alter beliefs about poverty
In advancing research to tackle the problem of burgeoning global economic inequality, researchers at Simon Fraser University used a poverty simulation game called SPENT to foster greater understanding of what causes poverty and economic inequality. (2020-03-16)

Study unveils striking disparities in health outcomes among 2 populations
In a new study published today in JAMA, a team of researchers at BIDMC evaluated how health outcomes for low-income older adults who are dually enrolled in both Medicare and Medicaid have changed since the early 2000s, and whether disparities have narrowed or widened over time compared with more affluent older adults who are solely enrolled in Medicare. (2020-03-11)

Learning empathy as a care giver takes more than experience
Research among nursing students shows that past experience living in poverty or volunteering in impoverished communities, does not sufficiently build empathy towards patients who experience poverty. (2020-03-09)

Native Americans and higher cigarette use: Stereotype goes up in smoke
University of Arizona Health Sciences study finds when whites and Native Americans in comparable income and education levels are compared, whites consume more cigarettes and are more nicotine dependent. Results published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence. (2020-03-05)

Study identifies regional malnutrition clusters across India
Childhood malnutrition in India remains a major problem. A new study shows that the problem is concentrated in specific geographic areas, which could help policymakers working to address the issue. (2020-03-03)

Study: inequality between men and women dramatic in Houston-area
Dramatic inequality between men and women exists in the Houston-area, according to a new study by the University of Houston Institute for Research on Women, Gender & Sexuality (IRWGS). The study reveals that women are almost 50% more likely to live in poverty than men and the wage gap for men and women by race and ethnicity is considerably greater here than nationally. (2020-02-17)

Nutrition a key ingredient for psychological health in Canadian adults
A new study investigating factors that contribute to psychological distress in adults has found that that risk of malnourishment is linked to psychological distress among Canadians aged 45 years and older. (2020-02-12)

Mind the trust gap: it's wider than you think
The regional gap in trust is not a result of the higher percentage of Black Americans -- who tend to have lower trust - living in the south, York University sociologist Prof. Cary Wu, who conducted the study said. Instead, the distrust is deeply rooted in the unique social and political culture shaped by the defeat in the Civil War, history of slavery, poverty, and prominence of religion in the southern United States. (2020-02-12)

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