Current Precipitation News and Events

Current Precipitation News and Events, Precipitation News Articles.
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Doctoral student leads paleoclimate study of precipitation and sea ice in Arctic Alaska
PhD candidate Ellie Broadman of Northern Arizona University's School of Earth and Sustainability developed and led a study in Arctic Alaska to investigate sea ice dynamics and their impact on circulation and precipitation patterns in Arctic Alaska on a long-term basis. She is the lead author on a paper detailing her team's findings, ''Coupled impacts of sea ice variability and North Pacific atmospheric circulation on Holocene hydroclimate in Arctic Alaska,'' recently published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2021-01-25)

Wetter weather affects composition, numbers of tiny estuarial phytoplankton
Extreme weather events, such as hurricanes and increased precipitation, affect both the amount and the composition of picophytoplankton in the Neuse River Estuary. The work is a first step in determining how a wetter climate may affect the estuarine ecosystem. (2021-01-25)

Climate change increases coastal blue carbon sequestration
Coastal wetlands are important ecosystems, especially in mitigating climate change. Prof. Faming Wang from South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Prof. Sanders from Southern Cross University,Australia worked together with several colleagues around the globe to examine coastal blue carbon burial rates. They showed that climate change will increase the carbon sequestration capacity of these systems around the world during this century. (2021-01-25)

Late rainy season reliably predicts drought in regions prone to food insecurity
The onset date of the yearly rainy season reliably predicts if seasonal drought will occur in parts of Sub-Saharan Africa that are particularly vulnerable to food insecurity, and could help to mitigate its effects. Shraddhanand Shukla and colleagues at the University of California, Santa Barbara's Climate Hazards Center, present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on January 20, 2021. (2021-01-20)

Climate change is hurting children's diets, global study finds
A first-of-its-kind, international study of 107,000 children finds that higher temperatures are an equal or even greater contributor to child malnutrition than the traditional culprits of poverty, inadequate sanitation, and poor education. The 19-nation study is the largest investigation to date of the relationship between our changing climate and children's diet diversity. Of the six regions examined--in Asia, Africa, and Central and South America--five had significant reductions in diet diversity associated with higher temperatures. (2021-01-14)

Understanding future species distribution: new data for biogeographers
A new CMCC global and free access dataset of 35 bioclimatic indicators just presented on Nature Scientific Data. It will complement and enlarge the availability of spatialized bioclimatic information, crucial aspect in many ecological and environmental studies and for several disciplines, including forestry, biodiversity conservation, plant and landscape ecology. (2021-01-14)

Climate change reduces the abundance and diversity of wild bees, study finds
Wild bees are more affected by climate change than by disturbances to their habitats, according to a team of researchers led by Penn State. The findings suggest that addressing land-use issues alone will not be sufficient to protecting these important pollinators. (2021-01-12)

Characteristics of severe thunderstorm and lightning activity in the Beijing metropolitan region
Severe thunderstorm is a kind of high-impact weather process producing lightning, heavy precipitation, hails, and wind gust, and still very difficult to be forecasted accurately up to now. A recent study published in Science China: Earth Sciences reported the characteristics of thunderstorm and lightning activity in the Beijing metropolitan region, and the result indicated that lightning data could be assimilated into the numerical weather model to improve the forecast of severe thunderstorm and heavy precipitation. (2021-01-12)

Asian water towers on tighter budget despite a warmer and wetter climate
Asian Water Towers will have to struggle to quench the thirst of downstream communities despite more river runoff brought on by a warmer climate, according to a recent study led by the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences. (2021-01-11)

Research confirms increase in river flooding and droughts in US, Canada
Research demonstrates that increases in the frequency of both high- and low-flow extreme streamflow events 'are, in fact, widespread.' (2021-01-07)

Will global warming bring a change in the winds? Dust from the deep sea provides a clue
In a new paper published in Nature, climate researchers from Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory describe a new method of tracking the ancient history of the westerly winds--a proxy for what we may experience in a future warming world. (2021-01-06)

Capturing 40 years of climate change for an endangered Montana prairie
Over 40 years of monitoring, an endangered bunchgrass prairie became hotter, drier and more susceptible to fire annually--but dramatic seasonal changes (not annual climate trends) seem to be driving the biggest changes in plant production, composition, and summer senescence. Gary Belovsky and Jennifer Slade of The University of Notre Dame, Indiana, present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on December 23, 2020. (2020-12-23)

Modeling rainfall drop by drop
A high-frequency model developed using data from new high-precision rain gauges gives fresh insight into the dynamics of rain and runoff events. (2020-12-20)

Change in global precipitation patterns as a result of climate change
The Earth's climate system is largely determined by the differences in temperature between the tropics and the poles. Global warming is likely to cause global atmospheric circulation to change and progressively revert to a situation similar to that of 5,000 to 10,000 years ago. This is the conclusion of a study published in Nature Communications. (2020-12-17)

Error correction means California's future wetter winters may never come
After probing a persistent error in widely used models, PNNL researchers estimate that California will likely experience drier winters in the future than projected by some climate models, meaning residents may see less spring runoff, higher spring temperatures, and an increased risk of wildfire in coming years. (2020-12-15)

Dynamics in the root zone
Nutrient contamination of groundwater as a result of nitrogen-based fertilisers is a problem in many places in Europe. Calculations by a team of scientists led by the UFZ have shown that over a period of at least four months per year, nitrate can leach into the groundwater and surface water on about three-quarters of Europe's agricultural land. The proportion of areas at risk from nitrate leaching is thus almost twice as large as previously assumed. (2020-12-09)

Wildfire risk rising as scientists determine which conditions beget blazes
As wildfires burn more often across the Western U.S., PNNL researchers are working to understand how extensively blazes burn. Their investigation, aided by machine learning techniques that sort fires by the conditions that precede them, not only reveals that the risk of wildfire is rising, but also spells out the role moisture plays in estimating fire risk. (2020-12-08)

Central Europe: dry Aprils pave the way for summer droughts
In the past 20 years, Central Europe has experienced six summer heat waves and droughts. Until now, however, it was unclear what factors led to these extreme events. (2020-12-07)

When the rains stopped
What can archaeologists tell us about the impacts of climate change on human history? Facets of human life, like breathing, cooking, bathing, agriculture, and engaging with the outdoors, become intertwined with a region's hydroclimate. Interactions with air and water, in turn, influence the ways humans construct and modify their societies. (2020-12-02)

Early human landscape modifications discovered in Amazonia
New research argues that the theories of extensive savannah formations in the South-western Amazonia during the current Holocene period are based on a false interpretation of the connection between charcoal accumulation and natural fires due to drier climatic periods. These interpretations have not taken into account the millennial human presence in Amazonia. (2020-12-01)

Satellite images confirm uneven impact of climate change
University of Copenhagen researchers have been following vegetation trends across the planet's driest areas using satellite imagery from recent decades. They have identified a troubling trend: Too little vegetation is sprouting up from rainwater in developing nations, whereas things are headed in the opposite direction in wealthier ones. As a result, the future could see food shortages and growing numbers of climate refugees. (2020-11-26)

Teton range glacial ice may have persisted in a dormant state during early Holocene warming
A continuous 10,000-year record of alpine glacier fluctuations in Wyoming's Teton Range suggests that some glacial ice in the western US persisted in a reduced, essentially dormant state during periods of early Holocene warming. The findings challenge the paradigm that all Rocky Mountain glaciers completely disappeared during these warm, dry conditions, instead. (2020-11-18)

Soil carbon changes in transition areas suggest conservation for Amazon, scientists say
Conservation efforts on the edges of the Amazon forest, especially in light of recent deforestation by human disturbance, could help the region weather the storm of climate change, researchers say. That assessment, led by researchers at the University of Oregon, comes from an analysis of vegetation changes and carbon isotope signatures in the soil at 83 sites. (2020-11-05)

Convection-permitting modelling improves simulated precipitation over the Tibetan Plateau
A China-UK research team explains the possible reasons for excessive precipitation over the TP in the mesoscale convection-parameterized models. (2020-11-04)

Back to the future of climate
Hot and humid: Using minerals from ancient soils, ETH researchers are reconstructing the climate that prevailed on Earth some 55 million years ago. Their findings will help them to better assess how our climate might look in the future. (2020-10-27)

0.5°C matters: Seasonal contrast of rainfall becomes intense in warming target of the Paris agreement
A recent work published in Earth's Future by a team of researchers from the Institute of Atmospheric Physics at the Chinese Academy of Sciences has found that the seasonal cycle of precipitation is likely to enhance at stabilized 1.5°C and 2°C warming scenarios. (2020-10-22)

Warm central equatorial pacific sea surface temperatures and anthropogenic warming boosted the 2019 severe drought in East China
A persistent severe drought occurred over East China along the Yangtze River in 2019 that lasted from August to October and caused large-scale negative impacts on lake water shortages and local agriculture. Results show that the central equatorial Pacific ENSO and anthropogenic warming were likely responsible for this drought event. (2020-10-14)

NASA rainfall imagery reveals Norbert regains tropical storm status
Norbert has been meandering around in the Eastern Pacific Ocean for several days as a tropical depression. A NASA satellite rainfall product that incorporates data from satellites and observations revealed that Norbert has regained tropical storm status after showing increased organization and deep convection. (2020-10-14)

NASA sees Tropical Storm Nangka soaking Hainan Island
Using a NASA satellite rainfall product that incorporates data from satellites and observations, NASA estimated Nangka's rainfall rates as the storm soaked Hainan Island, China early on Oct. 13 (EDT). (2020-10-13)

Hurricanes, heavy rains are critical for Hawai'i's groundwater supply
New research led by University of Hawai'i at Mānoa scientists indicates that rain brought to the islands by hurricanes and Kona storms can often be the most important precipitation for re-supplying groundwater in many regions of the island of O'ahu. (2020-10-12)

NASA shows heaviest rainfall displaced in Typhoon Chan-hom
Typhoon Chan-hom was still moving parallel to Japan's east coast as NASA's satellite rainfall product, that incorporates data from satellites and observations, showed its heaviest rainfall was pushed northeast of center. (2020-10-09)

Climate patterns linked in Amazon, North and South America, study shows
University of Arkansas researchers developed a tree-ring chronology from the Amazon River basin that established a link between climate patterns in the Amazon and the Americas. (2020-10-09)

NASA analyzes rainfall around Typhoon Chan-hom's ragged eye
A NASA satellite rainfall product that incorporates data from satellites and observations found heavy rainfall occurring throughout Typhoon Chan-hom and the heaviest rainfall in the eyewall. Chan-hom is expected to bring rainfall to Japan on its track through the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. (2020-10-07)

Looking for the key to predict heatwaves over the Yangtze River basin 20 days in advance
A new research evaluates the subseasonal prediction skill of heatwaves in the Yangtze River basin and identifies the crucial processes influencing the prediction skill using the long-term hindcast data from three operational models. (2020-10-05)

NASA finds heavy rainfall ringing major Hurricane Maria's eye
Imagine being able to look down at a storm from orbit in space, and provide data that lets scientists calculate the rate in which rain is falling throughout it. That is what a NASA satellite rainfall product does as it incorporates data from satellites and observations. NASA found very heavy rainfall ringing around the compact eye of Major Hurricane Marie. (2020-10-02)

Nights warming faster than days across much of the planet
Global warming is affecting daytime and night-time temperatures differently - and greater night-time warming is more common than greater daytime warming worldwide - new research shows. (2020-09-30)

NASA estimating Beta's rains moving into the Tennessee valley
Using a NASA satellite rainfall product that incorporates data from satellites and observations, NASA estimated Post-tropical Cyclone Beta's rainfall rates as it moved over Mississippi, Alabama and Tennessee. Beta continues a steady northeast track into Mississippi, bringing heavy rainfall across Mississippi into the Tennessee Valley. (2020-09-24)

Combined droughts and heatwaves are occurring more frequently in several regions across the US
The frequency of combined droughts and heatwaves -- which are more devastating when they occur in unison -- has substantially increased across the western US and in parts of the Northeast and Southeast over the past 50 years, according to a new study. The findings also suggest areas that experience compound dry-hot extremes are growing less scattered and more connected, resulting in larger impacted regions that place enormous strain on regional and national relief efforts. (2020-09-23)

NASA confirms development of record-breaking tropical storm Wilfred, ending hurricane list
The list of hurricane names is officially used up with the development of the 23rd tropical cyclone of the year. Tropical Storm Wilfred just formed in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean today, Sept. 18. Using a NASA satellite rainfall product that incorporates data from satellites and observations, NASA estimated Wilfred's rainfall rates. (2020-09-18)

NASA finds a fading wispy Tropical Depression Vicky
NASA's Terra satellite found Vicky to be a shadow of its former self, devoid of precipitation around its low-level center. Any precipitation had been pushed far to the northeast from wind shear. Vicky looked like a wispy ring of clouds on visible satellite imagery and nearby Hurricane Teddy is not helping. (2020-09-17)

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