Current Prejudice News and Events

Current Prejudice News and Events, Prejudice News Articles.
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Gay men who 'sound gay' encounter more stigma and discrimination from heterosexual peers
Gay men are more likely than lesbian women to face stigma and avoidant prejudice from their heterosexual peers due to the sound of their voice, a new study in the British Journal of Social Psychology reports. Researchers also found that gay men who believe they sound gay anticipate stigma and are more vigilant regarding the reactions of others. (2021-02-23)

Body shape, beyond weight, drives fat stigma for women
Fat stigma in women contributes to poor medical outcomes and negatively affects educational and economic opportunities. A new study from scientists at Arizona State University and Oklahoma State University shows that body shape, beyond overall weight, drives fat stigma. Women with overweight and obesity who carry gluteofemoral fat were less stigmatized than those who carry abdominal fat. These findings could affect how interventions for overweight and obesity are designed and delivered. (2021-02-17)

Addressing power differences may spur advantaged racial groups to act for racial equality
When different groups of people come into contact, what's the key to motivating advantaged racial groups to join historically disadvantaged racial minority groups to strive for racial equality and social justice? It's a complex conundrum studied for years by social scientists like Linda Tropp, professor of social psychology at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. (2021-02-02)

Black and Hispanic Californians face health discrimination; less trusting of clinicians
A recent statewide survey of Californians uncovered that 30% of Black adults and 13% of Hispanic adults felt that they have been judged or treated differently by a health care provider because of their race/ethnicity or language. (2021-01-12)

Xenophobia in Germany is declining, but old resentments are paired with new radicalism
Xenophobia in Germany has decreased, but right-wing extremist attitudes remain high. There is also evidence of ''radicalisation and disinhibition among those with far-right views''. These are key findings of the representative Leipzig Authoritarianism Study. Professors Oliver Decker and Elmar Brähler from the Competence Centre for Right-Wing Extremism and Democracy Research at Leipzig University presented the study results today (18 November) at the Federal Press Conference (BPK) in Berlin. (2020-11-18)

Conservatives and liberals motivated by different psychological factors, new study shows
Liberalism and conservatism are associated with qualitatively different psychological concerns, notably those linked to morality, shows a new study that explores how political ideology and moral values are connected to motivated social cognition. (2020-11-11)

Paper addresses fieldwork safety for minority scientists
Scientists and graduate students with minority identities who conduct fieldwork report being stalked, followed, sexually assaulted, harassed, threatened, having guns pulled on them and police called on them. These issues threaten minority-identity researchers' physical health and safety during fieldwork, while also affecting their mental health, productivity and professional development. (2020-11-04)

Stereotypes and discrimination contribute to HIV-related stigma among nursing staff
To describe the attitudes of the university nursing faculty toward caring for PLHIV; and to identify the relationship between faculty attitudes and explanatory factors such as age, education, religion, nationality, teaching in a clinical setting, years of experience, and university attributes. (2020-10-30)

How the immune system deals with the gut's plethora of microbes
New research suggests that our immune system may play an active role in shaping the digestive-tract flora, which is tightly linked to health and disease. (2020-10-29)

Study reveals why some blame Asian Americans for COVID-19
A blend of racial prejudice, poor coping and partisan media viewing were found in Americans who stigmatized people of Asian descent during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study. But it was prejudice against Asian Americans that was most strongly linked to beliefs that Asians were responsible for the pandemic and most at risk for spreading it, results showed. (2020-10-20)

Friendly interactions with Chinese people reduced COVID-19 prejudice
A new study finds that friendly interactions with Chinese people reduced Covid-19 prejudice as the virus hit the UK back in February. At the time, opinion polls suggested that one in three Brits already saw the virus as a personal threat and the British press were reporting a rise in hate crimes towards Chinese people. Researchers studied how UK residents felt towards the Chinese community as the pandemic reached our shores, and how these feelings might relate to British support for anti-Chinese policies. (2020-09-27)

When it comes to supporting candidates, ideology trumps race and gender
Voters who express prejudice against minorities and women are still more likely to support candidates who most closely align with their ideologies, regardless of the race or sex of such candidates, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2020-08-24)

Positive contact between muslims and christians in soccer league built cohesion, with limitations
According to a study that evaluated how prejudice can be reduced when rival groups come together, having Muslim teammates caused Christian players in Iraq to change their behavior for the better toward their Muslim counterparts. (2020-08-13)

Pandemic resource allocation needs to address health inequity
The Johns Hopkins team provides recommendations for how hospitals can provide equitable care during pandemic resource allocation, such as by requiring regular bias training and creating periodic checkpoints to assess inequities in the system. (2020-06-30)

Confrontation may reduce white prejudices, Rutgers study finds
Confronting a white person who makes a racist or sexist statement can make them reflect on their words and avoid making biased statements about race or gender in the future, Rutgers researchers find. (2020-06-25)

COVID-19: Relationship between social media use and prejudice against Chinese Americans
The novel coronavirus pandemic that originated in China has created a backlash in the United States against Asian Americans. Researchers in New Zealand found a strong relationship between the pandemic, social media use and prejudice. Gender appears to play a significant role in predicting whether someone reacts more intellectually or emotionally to perceived threats from a minority population. (2020-06-12)

Depression viewed differently when thought to be biological
People who believe more strongly that depression is biologically caused also tend to think it is more severe and long lasting, compared to those who see less of a role for biological causes, a new Rutgers study finds. (2020-05-27)

OU professor examines the fifty shades phenomenon
In a new study, Meredith G. F. Worthen, professor of sociology at the University of Oklahoma, and Trenton M. Haltom (Ph.D. candidate, University of Nebraska and OU alumnus) investigate how identifying as a member of the leather community is related to attitudes toward women. (2020-05-12)

Did 'Joker' movie perpetuate prejudices against those with mental illness?
Researchers in this survey study examined whether watching the 2019 movie 'Joker,' in which the namesake character is violent and has mental illness, was associated with a change in the level of prejudice toward people with mental illness compared with others who watched another movie. (2020-04-24)

Student led efforts can help make college campuses 'safe and stigma free' zones
The Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), reports on a study following a four year effort to change the stigma of mental illness at Indiana University, which drew the attention of students and faculty; increased awareness of discrimination and prejudice; and decreased prejudice and increased inclusion. (2020-04-14)

Research finds support for 'Trump effect'
In the years since the 2016 presidential election, many have speculated Donald Trump's racially inflammatory speech empowered people with latent prejudices to finally act on them -- a phenomenon known as the 'Trump effect.' Now, a new study from a team of political scientists at the University of California, Riverside, has found empirical support that suggests Trump's inflammatory remarks on the campaign trail emboldened particular members of the American public to express deeply held prejudices. (2020-02-24)

Majority-minority social-group contact proves negative for the latter
The study, in which the University of Granada participated, was published recently by the journal Nature Human Behavior. It highlights that, contrary to what was previously thought, among minority groups this contact appears to be negatively related to support for social change toward greater equality. (2020-02-06)

Openly acknowledging social inequalities
Members of disadvantaged social groups who engage in contact with members of privileged groups are less likely to support social change toward equality, a multinational study by social psychologists at the University of Zurich shows. To reduce this effect, it is important to actively address and acknowledge inequalities in intergroup contacts. (2020-01-29)

Third Reich's legacy tied to present-day xenophobia and political intolerance
Who -- or what -- is to blame for the xenophobia, political intolerance and radical political parties spreading through Germany and the rest of Europe? A new study from Rice University and Washington University in St. Louis shows a major factor is people's proximity to former Nazi concentration camps. (2020-01-28)

Effects of contact between minority and majority groups more complex than once believed
For more than 50 years, social scientists and practitioners have suggested that having members of different groups interact with each other can be an effective tool for reducing prejudice. But emerging research points to a more complex and nuanced understanding of the effects of contact between groups, say Linda Tropp at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Tabea Hässler, leader of a multi-national research team based at the University of Zurich, Switzerland. (2020-01-27)

How universities may help bridge social divide between international, domestic students
Self-esteem is a valuable resource for undergraduate international students trying to socialize with their domestic counterparts at American universities, but new research by a University at Buffalo psychologist suggests that while self-esteem predicts better socialization with domestic students, it is curiously unrelated to how international students socialize with other internationals. (2020-01-08)

Gender norms affect attitudes towards gay men and lesbian women globally
A study of attitudes towards sexual minorities in 23 countries show more negative views towards gay men than lesbian women, but culture creates some variation on who holds the negative attitudes. (2019-12-26)

Different approaches to 'zero-sum' thinking, contribute to political divide
Voters tend to believe that one political party's gain can only be obtained at another party's expense, according to a new study. (2019-12-18)

New research suggests robots appear more persuasive when pretending to be human
Recent technological breakthroughs in artificial intelligence have made it possible for machines, or bots, to pass as humans. A team of researchers at NYU Abu Dhabi, studied study how people interact with bots they believe to be human, and how such interactions are affected once bots reveal their identity. The researchers found that bots are more efficient than humans at certain human-machine interactions, but only if they are allowed to hide their non-human nature. (2019-11-12)

Negative news coverage empowers collective action in minorities
When minorities perceive negative news about their racial ethnic groups as inaccurate, some believe they have the power to enact change. (2019-10-18)

LGBT+ women face barriers to healthcare
New study suggests diversity messaging is not filtering down to frontline staff. (2019-09-19)

White parents' racial bias awareness associated with greater willingness to discuss race
A new Northwestern University study found that white parents' racial bias awareness was associated with greater willingness to discuss race with their children, along with increased color consciousness and decreased color blindness. (2019-08-26)

Political campaigns may influence acceptance of violence against women
Nicole Johnson, assistant professor of counseling psychology at Lehigh University, set out to examine the influence, both positive and negative, of presidential campaigns, voting behavior, and candidate selection, on social views of rape culture. (2019-08-15)

Medical mistrust impacts African American men's preventive health, but racism also matters
Mistrust of health care providers, fueled by painful experiences with racism, makes African American men more likely to delay routine screenings and doctor's appointments, according to a new study in the journal Behavioral Medicine by the Health Disparities Institute (HDI) at UConn Health, with potentially serious implications for their overall health. (2019-08-07)

'Fat suit' role play may help uncover medical student prejudices against obesity
Getting patients to wear an obesity simulation suit, popularly known as a 'fat suit', may prove a useful teaching aid and help to uncover medical student prejudice against obesity, suggests a proof of concept study published in the online journal BMJ Open. (2019-08-05)

In the shoes of a robot: The future approaches
Identifying with someone is an exercise that makes us understand them deeply, empathize with them, and helps us overcome mistrust and prejudice. And this occurs even when that someone is a robot. These interpersonal dynamics were confirmed by an experimental study that was published days ago in Scientific Reports. The study is the result of scientific collaboration between Italian and French scientists. It contributes to improving the relationship with technology (2019-07-23)

The unpopular truth about biases toward people with disabilities
Needing to ride in a wheelchair can put the brakes on myriad opportunities -- some less obvious than one might think. New research from Michigan State University sheds light on the bias people have toward people with disabilities, known as 'ableism,' and how it shifts over time. (2019-07-18)

A study analyzes the influence of political affinities in the processes of socialization
A study in which the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid participated (UC3M) has concluded that most people prefer not to have much to do with those who have political sympathies which are different from their own. Moreover, a substantial proportion of Spaniards are hostile towards those who do not have the same political preferences as them. The research appears in the latest issue of PLOS ONE. (2019-07-17)

'You all look alike to me' is hard-wired in us, UCR research finds
We are hard-wired to process -- or not process -- facial differences based on race. And that process occurs in the earliest filters of our thought process, according to newly published UC Riverside research. (2019-07-08)

Study finds psychiatric diagnosis to be 'scientifically meaningless'
A new study, published in Psychiatry Research, has concluded that psychiatric diagnoses are scientifically worthless as tools to identify discrete mental health disorders. (2019-07-08)

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