Current Premature Babies News and Events

Current Premature Babies News and Events, Premature Babies News Articles.
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How reducing body temperature could help a tenth of all ICU patients
ROCKVILLE, MD - A tenth of all intensive care unit patients worldwide, and many critical patients with COVID-19, have acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). (2021-02-23)

Researchers learn that pregnant women pass along protective COVID antibodies to their babies
Antibodies that guard against COVID-19 can transfer from mothers to babies while in the womb, according to a new study from Weill Cornell Medicine and NewYork-Presbyterian researchers published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. (2021-02-22)

COVID-19 infection in pregnancy not linked with still birth or baby death
COVID-19 infection in pregnancy is not associated with stillbirth or early neonatal death, according to a new study. (2021-02-22)

Electricity source determines benefits of electrifying China's vehicles
Researchers have concluded air quality and public health benefits of EVs -- as well as their ability to reduce carbon emissions -- in China are dependent on the type of transport electrified and the composition of the electric grid. (2021-02-16)

Drinking, smoking, and drug use linked to premature heart disease in the young
Recreational drinking, smoking, and drug use is linked to premature heart disease in young people, particularly younger women, finds research published online in the journal Heart. (2021-02-15)

Lifestyle changes in pregnant women affected babies' genes
A study led by researchers at Lund University in Sweden showed a connection between lifestyle intervention in pregnant women with obesity and epigenetic alterations in the baby. The study is published in the journal Diabetes. (2021-02-11)

New study gives hope of eliminating mother-to-baby transmission of HIV
Anti-retroviral drugs are a vital tool in the prevention and treatment of HIV. A new study of pregnant women in Tanzania shows that life-long antiviral treatment also seems to prevent viral transmission from mother to baby. The results of the study, which was conducted in part by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and published in Lancet HIV, make a promising contribution to the WHO's work with HIV prevention in low and middle-income countries. (2021-02-11)

Heart disease deaths rising in young women
A nationwide US study has found increasing death rates from heart disease in women under 65. The research is published in European Heart Journal - Quality of Care and Clinical Outcomes, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).1 The study found that while death rates from cancer declined every year between 1999 and 2018, after an initial drop, heart disease death rates have been rising since 2010. (2021-02-10)

A 'skeletal age' calculator to predict bone fracture risk
Garvan researchers have developed a model to predict the biological age of bones that may improve the management of osteoporotic fractures. (2021-02-09)

Nitrate in maternal drinking water may impair fetal growth
Women whose household drinking water contained nitrate had babies that weighed, on average, 10 grams less than babies born to mothers where household water had no detectible nitrate, according to a new study. Even low nitrate levels -- about half of the allowable level set by the US Environmental Protection Agency, or EPA -- caused an adverse effect. (2021-02-09)

Increased risk of dying from COVID for people with severe mental disorders
People with severe mental disorders have a significantly increased risk of dying from COVID-19. This has been shown in a new study from UmeƄ University and Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. Among the elderly, the proportion of deaths due to COVID-19 was almost fourfold for those with severe mental disorders compared to non-mentally ill people in the same age. (2021-02-03)

Halved risk for severe retinal disease in extremely premature infants
Risk for a severe form of retinopathy of prematurity, which can cause blindness in extremely premature babies, was halved when the newborns were given a new supplement combining various fatty acids. This was shown in a Swedish study led from the University of Gothenburg. (2021-02-01)

Toddlers who use touchscreens may be more distractible
New research published in Scientific Report highlights some of the effects regular use of touchscreens might have on toddlers. (2021-01-26)

Severe menopause symptoms often accompany premature ovarian insufficiency
Hot flashes, insomnia, and vaginal dryness are commonly reported symptoms that accompany the menopause transition. A new study suggests that such symptoms--especially psychological and sexual problems--are worse for women who have premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) than for women undergoing natural menopause. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2021-01-20)

Ohio State-led support program suggests a reduction in preterm birth and infant mortality
New research suggests a unique program called Moms2B at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center shows a reduction in adverse pregnancy outcomes in communities disproportionately affected by these public health issues. (2021-01-19)

Research reveals new insight into why breastfed babies have improved immune systems
Research has revealed new insight into the biological mechanisms of the long-term positive health effects of breastfeeding. (2021-01-14)

Nanotechnology prevents premature birth in mouse studies
In a study in mice and human cells, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say that they have developed a tiny, yet effective method for preventing premature birth. (2021-01-13)

For moms, oxygen during childbirth often unnecessary
A comprehensive analysis - led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis - has found no benefit in providing supplemental oxygen to mothers during labor and delivery, a decades-long and common practice. Infants born to women who received supplemental oxygen fared no better or no worse than those born to women who had similar labor experiences but breathed room air. (2021-01-04)

Transfusions with higher red blood cell levels do not improve preterm baby outcomes
National Institutes of Health-funded randomized clinical trial is the largest study to-date to compare thresholds for blood transfusions in premature babies, offers guidance for health care providers. (2020-12-31)

OSU studies find Oregon's Medicaid expansion improved prenatal care access, birth outcomes
A pair of recent studies from Oregon State University found that Oregon's Medicaid expansion in 2014 has led to increased prenatal care among low-income women, as well as improved health outcomes for newborn babies. (2020-12-31)

Prenatal testing has halved the number of babies born with Down syndrome in Europe
For the first time, a study has aggregated data on the number of babies born with Down syndrome in each European country. Researchers estimate the number of people with Down syndrome alive each year between 1950 and 2015. It is critical to have accurate estimates of the prevalence of Down syndrome so each country can evaluate the impact of prenatal testing on its population and to allocate appropriate resources to its citizens with Down syndrome. (2020-12-18)

Green revolution saved over 100 million infant lives in developing world
New research from the University of California San Diego shows that since modern crop varieties were introduced in the developing world starting in 1961, they have substantially reduced infant mortality, especially for male babies and among poor households. (2020-12-17)

BAME babies at highest risk of Vitamin D deficiency
A third of all babies and half of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) babies are vitamin D deficient, a large study of 3000 newborn's in the West Midlands has shown. (2020-12-16)

Stem cell-derived extracellular vesicles ease brain bleeding in newborn rats
Murine study, by researchers at Sungkyunkwan University in Seoul, shows how extracellular vesicles (EVs) derived from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can ease IVH-induced brain injuries. (2020-12-15)

Everything you want to know about sunscreen
From safety and effectiveness to who should use sunscreen and how to apply it, Canadian dermatologists review the latest evidence and guidelines on use of sunscreen. The review, published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal), recommends that everyone older than six months of age should use sunscreen to protect against skin cancer (2020-12-14)

Singing to preterm infants during kangaroo care reduces maternal anxiety
Premature births are stressful experiences that increase the risk of anxiety for mothers and may hinder the development of interaction between mother and infant. A new study indicates that the combination of singing and kangaroo care boosts the wellbeing of the mothers of preterm infants, also making it easier for them to establish a connection with their baby. (2020-12-14)

Youth depression tied to higher risk of 66 diseases and premature death
Depressed children and teenagers have an increased risk of suffering from premature death and a wide range of illnesses later in life. That is according to a large observational study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. The findings highlight the need to look for other potential diseases following childhood or adolescent depression. Other psychiatric conditions, such as anxiety and substance misuse, can explain part of the association. The study is published in JAMA Psychiatry. (2020-12-09)

Lab-grown human brain organoids mimic an autism spectrum disorder, help test treatments
UC San Diego researchers used brain organoids to identify two drug candidates that counteract the genetic deficiencies that cause Rett syndrome, a rare form of autism spectrum disorder. (2020-12-08)

Maternal anxiety affects the fetal brain
Anxiety in gestating mothers appears to affect the course of brain development in their fetuses, changing neural connectivity in the womb, a new study by Children's National Hospital researchers suggests. The findings, published Dec. 7, 2020, in JAMA Open Network, could help explain longstanding links between maternal anxiety and neurodevelopmental disorders in their children and suggests an urgent need for interventions to diagnose and decrease maternal stress. (2020-12-07)

Small and large birth weight linked to genetics of mother and baby -- except in tiniest babies
Genetics of mother and baby contribute to most cases where babies are born very large or very small, according to new research. (2020-12-02)

How we learn words and sentences at the same time
How people work out the meanings of new words has been revealed by Lancaster University researchers, who say this is similar to the way in which young children learn language. The researchers said: ''A lot of what infants hear is ''who's a lovely baby yes you are now where's teddy gone oh look here is teddy''. How do babies begin to make sense of this burbling to figure out the language?'' (2020-11-30)

Mothers' stress may lead to preterm births, faster aging in children
Why do some people age faster than others? A new UCLA-led study indicates that a mother's stress prior to giving birth may accelerate her child's biological aging later in life. A second UCLA-led study from the same research group found that women suffering from high stress during the months and even years before conception -- defined as feeling overwhelmed and unable to cope -- had shorter pregnancies than other women. (2020-11-30)

Early birth linked to greater risk of hospital visits during childhood
Being born early (before 37 weeks' gestation) is associated with a higher risk of hospital admission throughout childhood than being born at full term (40 weeks' gestation), finds a study published by The BMJ today. (2020-11-25)

Stress in pregnancy may influence baby brain development
Infants' brains may be shaped by levels of stress their mother experiences during pregnancy, a brain scanning study has revealed. (2020-11-24)

Act now to meet global heart disease targets
Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of mortality in Europe, and World Health Organization (WHO) heart disease goals will not be achieved by 2025 unless urgent action is taken. That is the finding of a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) report published today. 'Cardiovascular Realities 2020' is a compendium of the latest statistics on cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Europe. The document provides numbers of people with heart conditions, death rates, and levels of risk factors including obesity, diabetes, and high blood pressure. (2020-11-24)

Newfound ability to change baby brain activity could lead to rehabilitation for injured brains
Researchers from King's College London have identified the brain activity for the first time in a newborn baby when they are learning an association between different types of sensory experiences. Using advanced MRI scanning techniques and robotics, the researchers found that a baby's brain activity can be changed through these associations, shedding new light on the possibility of rehabilitating babies with injured brains and promoting the development of life-long skills such as speech, language and movement. (2020-11-23)

New non-invasive technology could spot early signs of motor disorders in babies
Imperial College London scientists have created the world's first non-invasive way to map how baby movements are generated on a neuronal level. (2020-11-20)

More than 1.1 million deaths among Medicare recipients due to high cost of drugs
WASHINGTON, DC and SAN DIEGO, CA - Nov. 19, 2020 - More than 1.1 million Medicare patients could die over the next decade because they cannot afford to pay for their prescription medications, according to a new study released today by the West Health Policy Center, a nonprofit and nonpartisan policy research group and Xcenda, the research arm of the drug distributor AmerisourceBergen. (2020-11-19)

Cesarean-born babies at increased risk of infection-related hospitalisation in childhood
Cesarean-born babies are at increased risk during early childhood of being hospitalised due to an infection, according to a new study of over seven million births from four countries. (2020-11-19)

Low levels of choline in pregnant Black American women associated with higher levels of stress
Researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have found that many pregnant Black Americans have low levels of choline, an essential nutrient that aids in prenatal brain development. Stress caused by institutional racism may play a role. (2020-11-16)

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