Current Premature Infants News and Events | Page 25

Current Premature Infants News and Events, Premature Infants News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 25 of 25 | 1000 Results
Infants know what we like best, WashU study finds
Behind the chubby cheeks and bright eyes of babies as young as 8 months lies the smoothly whirring mind of a social statistician, logging our every move and making odds on what a person is most likely to do next, suggests new research in the journal Infancy. (2017-07-27)

Even babies can tell who's the boss, UW research says
Social dominance, and the dynamic it creates, may be so naturally ingrained, University of Washington researchers say, that toddlers as young as 17 months old not only can perceive who is dominant, but also anticipate that the dominant person will receive more rewards. (2017-07-27)

Research evaluates impact of surgical modality on breast-specific sensuality
Does the type of surgery used to treat breast cancer impact a woman's sensuality and sexual function in survivorship? New research from Women & Infants Hospital analyzed the association of surgical modality with sexual function and found that breast-specific sensuality and appearance satisfaction are better with lumpectomy and may correlate with improved sexual function post-operatively. (2017-07-26)

Issues with maternal screening for congenital cytomegalovirus infection
Human cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a common virus found worldwide. When CMV infects fetuses, it can cause serious complications such as hearing difficulties and mental retardation in affected infants. A group of researchers have evaluated for the first time the efficacy of maternal universal screening using CMV IgG avidity tests for congenital CMV infection, and they have also identified issues with the current maternal CMV screening methods. (2017-07-24)

Family factors may influence a child's temperament
A new article addresses ongoing conversations about bridging the gap between practice and research within the field of family therapy. (2017-07-20)

Noninvasive test may predict asthma attacks in children
A new technology may help to noninvasively analyze lung sounds in children and infants at risk of an asthma attack. (2017-07-19)

Study examines birth defects following 9/11 terrorist attacks
A recent study found that birth defects among male infants fell below expected values after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. (2017-07-19)

Does having a sibling with autism affect a child's language and motor skills?
A review of published studies suggests that infants who have siblings with autism spectrum disorder may have less advanced linguistic and motor skills than siblings of children with typical development. (2017-07-19)

Weight gain from early to middle adulthood may increase risk of major chronic diseases
Cumulative weight gain over the course of early and middle adulthood may increase health risks later in life, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. (2017-07-18)

Young adult obesity: A neglected, yet essential focus to reverse the obesity epidemic
The overall burden of the US obesity epidemic continues to require new thinking, says William Dietz, M.D., Ph.D., Chair of the Sumner M. Redstone Global Center for Prevention and Wellness at the Milken Institute School of Public Health at the George Washington University. (2017-07-18)

Pre-pregnancy obesity increases risk for neurocognitive problems in premature babies
A new study has found that children born extremely premature to women who are overweight or obese before the pregnancy are at an increased risk for low scores on tests of intelligence and cognitive processes that influence self-regulation and control, according to researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. (2017-07-18)

Which infants exposed to Zika virus infection in pregnancy should have eyes examined?
Eye abnormalities in infants from Brazil born to mothers with confirmed Zika virus infection in pregnancy are described in an article published by JAMA Pediatrics. (2017-07-17)

New study shows how exposure to a foreign language ignites infants' learning
A new study by the University of Washington, published July 17 in Mind, Brain, and Education, is among the first to investigate how babies can learn a second language outside of the home. The researchers sought to answer a fundamental question: Can babies be taught a second language if they don't get foreign language exposure at home, and if so, what kind of foreign language exposure, and how much, is needed to spark that learning? (2017-07-17)

Study identifies tools to identify patients at risk for autism spectrum disorders
A tool intended to detect signs of autism in high-risk infants can be used to help identify and treat patients with tuberous sclerosis complex, a genetic disorder, who most need early intervention. Moreover, they can identify these patients earlier than ever before. (2017-07-17)

Mountain gorillas have herpes virus similar to that found in humans
Scientists from the University of California, Davis, have detected a herpes virus in wild mountain gorillas that is very similar to the Epstein-Barr virus in humans. (2017-07-13)

Researchers investigate possible link between carnitine deficiency and autism
At Baylor College of Medicine, Dr. Arthur Beaudet has been following clinical and genetic clues in patients with autism spectrum disorder and experimental results in animal models that have led him to propose that the lack of carnitine, a nutrient needed for the normal development and workings of the brain, the liver, the heart and other muscles, might be involved in triggering mild forms of autism. (2017-07-13)

Ga-ga, goo-goo, why a baby likes you
By the age of one, infants already prefer speakers of their native tongue, but do not necessarily view speakers of an unfamiliar language negatively, according to new UBC research. The findings suggest that, while positivity toward familiar groups may be innate, dislike for unfamiliar groups appears to be a learned behavior. (2017-07-13)

Babies born big more likely to become obese as children, study finds
Infants born with a high birthweight are more likely to become obese as children, a new study suggests. By identifying at-risk infants early, doctors could work with parents to prevent weight gain and the health problems obesity brings. (2017-07-12)

Preeclampsia: New study documents its enormous economic and health burden
Rates of preeclampsia are rising rapidly, yet surprisingly there are few national estimates of the health and economic impact of preeclampsia on mothers and their infants. A new study in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology (AJOG) provides sobering data on this topic by examining the short-term costs associated with the condition. Significantly increasing the chance of adverse health outcomes, preeclampsia accounts for over $2.18 billion of health care expenditure in the first 12 months after birth. (2017-07-11)

Study of premature babies has implications for future treatment
Study of premature babies has implications for future treatment Research carried out by the University of Kent with doctors on the neonatal unit at the William Harvey Hospital and Brunel University have provided further insight into the biology of premature birth, with findings that may have implications for treating premature babies. (2017-07-11)

Does baby-led approach to complementary feeding reduce overweight risk?
A randomized clinical trial published by JAMA Pediatrics examined whether allowing infants to control their food intake by feeding themselves solid foods, instead of traditional spoon-feeding, would reduce the risk of overweight or impact other secondary outcomes up to age 2. (2017-07-10)

Heavier birthweight linked to increased risk of obesity in early school-aged children
In a recent study, babies who were large at birth had an increased likelihood of being obese when they were in kindergarten to second grade (age 5 to 8 years). (2017-07-07)

Mothers often distracted during breast and bottle feeding
As innovation expands the accessibility of technology, the potential for distraction increases as well. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior assesses the level and type of distractions that affect mothers during infant feeding and discusses the potential impact on mothers and babies. Researchers found that distractions occurred in close to half of feedings, with ~60 percent of distractions attributable to technological devices. (2017-07-06)

Improved risk recognition expected to enhance fertility preservation for cancer patients
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital has advanced understanding of risk factors for premature ovarian insufficiency, which should aid identification of cancer patients most likely to benefit from fertility preservation. (2017-07-05)

Early-life pain may lead to obesity risk, especially in females, study finds
Inflammatory pain at birth changes how the hippocampus, a part of the brain associated with memory and eating behavior, works later in life, and this pain also causes adult rats to eat more frequently and in larger amounts, according to a study by Georgia State University and the Charlie Norwood VA Medical Center. (2017-07-05)

Differences in US infant mortality rates among black and white babies
A new research letter published by JAMA Pediatrics examined trends in overall and cause-specific infant mortality rates between non-Hispanic black and white infants because infant mortality is an important indicator of population health. (2017-07-03)

Blood of SIDS infants contains high levels of serotonin
Blood samples from infants who died of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) had high levels of serotonin, a chemical that carries signals along and between nerves, according to a study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health. The finding raises the possibility that a test could be developed to distinguish SIDS cases from other causes of sleep-related, unexpected infant death. (2017-07-03)

Depression linked to physical health decline in cancer caregivers
A new report finds that symptoms of depression are the only significant predictor of caregivers' physical health decline. (2017-06-29)

Study of US seniors strengthens link between air pollution and premature death
A new study of 60 million Americans -- about 97 percent of people age 65 and older in the United States -- shows that long-term exposure to airborne fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone increases the risk of premature death, even when that exposure is at levels below the National Ambient Air Quality Standards. (2017-06-28)

How to stay sane when your child can't sleep
Your child's sleep problems may be making you depressed and unsure of your parenting skills, says a new paper by UBC sleep expert and nursing professor Wendy Hall. The good news is you can turn the situation around. In this Q&A, she talks about the connection between parental sanity and infant sleep -- and offers a few suggestions for parents unsure of the way forward. (2017-06-26)

Premature infants at greater risk of SIDS
Premature infants still have a greater risk compared to full-term babies of dying of SIDS and other sleep-related infant deaths despite recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics that hospital NICU's provide more safe infant sleep education to parents before they go home. (2017-06-26)

Late premature birth increases risk of recurrent hospitalization for respiratory illness
A new study of children up to 2 years of age showed that those born late preterm (34-36 weeks) had a significantly greater risk of recurrent hospitalization due to respiratory illness compared to those who were born full term (>37 weeks). (2017-06-21)

HIV-positive women with cytomegalovirus likelier to pass virus that causes AIDS to infant
HIV-positive women with cytomegalovirus, or CMV, in their urine at the time of labor and delivery are more than five times likelier than HIV-positive women without CMV to transmit HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, to their infants. The research also found that they are nearly 30 times likelier to transmit cytomegalovirus to their infants. (2017-06-21)

The cost of opioid use during pregnancy
A new study published today by the scientific journal Addiction reveals that the incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome -- often caused by mothers using opioids during pregnancy -- is increasing in the United States, and carries an enormous burden in terms of hospital days and costs. The number of US hospital admissions involving neonatal abstinence syndrome increased more than fourfold between the years 2003 and 2012. In 2012, neonatal abstinence syndrome cost nearly $316 million in the United States. (2017-06-14)

Continuing anti-TNF treatment with CZP for RA during pregnancy: No or negligible placental transfer
The results of a pharmacokinetic study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology 2017 showed no or negligible placental transfer of the anti-TNF drug certolizumab pegol from mothers to infants during pregnancy. (2017-06-14)

Treating nutritional iron-deficiency anemia in children
In a study published by JAMA, Jacquelyn M. Powers, M.D., M.S., of the Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, and colleagues compared two medications, ferrous sulfate and iron polysaccharide complex, for the treatment of nutritional iron-deficiency anemia in infants and children. (2017-06-13)

How do preemies perform in school?
Parents of prematurely born babies often fear their children may go on to struggle in school, but findings from a new large-scale study from the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University and Northwestern Medicine should reassure parents. (2017-06-12)

Short duration of breastfeeding and maternal obesity linked to fatty liver in adolescents
Infants who were breastfed for less than six months before starting infant formula milk and infants who had mothers who were obese at the start of pregnancy, were much more likely to develop nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) as adolescents, according to a novel study in the Journal of Hepatology. (2017-06-11)

NIH-led workshop addresses opioid misuse during pregnancy
Research is essential to determining how best to screen pregnant women for opioid use disorder, to treat pregnant women who have the disorder, and to care for infants as they experience withdrawal symptoms, according to experts convened for a National Institutes of Health workshop in April 2016. A summary of the workshop, co-sponsored by NIH's Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), appears in the online issue of Obstetrics and Gynecology. (2017-06-09)

Infants born preterm may lack key lung cells later in life
Mice born into an oxygen-rich environment respond worse to the flu once fully grown due to an absence of certain lung cells, a discovery that provides a potential explanation for preterm infants' added susceptibility to influenza and other lung diseases later in their lives, according to new research from the University of Rochester Medical Center. (2017-06-09)

Page 25 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.