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Current Preterm Birth News and Events, Preterm Birth News Articles.
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Study finds no change in preterm birth or stillbirth in Philadelphia during pandemic
Despite early reports suggesting a decline in preterm births during the COVID-19 pandemic period, an analysis by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has found no change in preterm births or stillbirths at two Philadelphia hospitals in the first four months of the pandemic. The findings, published today in JAMA, resulted from the examination of an ongoing, racially-diverse pregnancy cohort that assesses both spontaneous and medically-indicated preterm birth. (2020-12-07)

Baby's first breath triggers life-saving changes in the brain
A new discovery reveals how something amazing happens when a baby takes a first breath. The finding could shed light on sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). (2020-12-04)

Gestational age linked to ADHD in children with Down syndrome
A new study by the UC Davis MIND Institute finds a connection between gestational age and ADHD in children with Down syndrome. An earlier gestational age is linked to higher ADHD symptoms later in childhood. (2020-12-04)

Role of birth order on career choice might have been overestimated in previous research
In a new study that could turn what we know about birth order upside down, a University of Houston researcher has found that the role of birth order on career types, occupational creativity and status attainment might have been overestimated in previous research. (2020-12-03)

Xenophobic and racist policies in the US may have harmful effect on birth outcomes
The first U.S. Executive Order of the 2017 travel ban targeting individuals from Muslim majority countries may be associated with preterm births for women from those countries residing in the U.S., according to a new study conducted at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. The research also showed that structurally xenophobic and racist policies in the U.S. may have a harmful effect on early life indicators of life-long health outcomes. (2020-12-02)

Small and large birth weight linked to genetics of mother and baby -- except in tiniest babies
Genetics of mother and baby contribute to most cases where babies are born very large or very small, according to new research. (2020-12-02)

Study on placenta membrane cells identifies genetic markers associated with preterm birth
A new research study from the March of Dimes Prematurity Research Center led by investigators at the University of Chicago has identified new genetic markers associated with gestational length, providing new insights into potential risk factors for preterm birth. (2020-12-02)

Birth defects linked to greater risk of cancer in later life
People born with major birth defects face a higher risk of cancer throughout life, although the relative risk is greatest in childhood and then declines, finds a study published by The BMJ today. (2020-12-02)

Mothers' stress may lead to preterm births, faster aging in children
Why do some people age faster than others? A new UCLA-led study indicates that a mother's stress prior to giving birth may accelerate her child's biological aging later in life. A second UCLA-led study from the same research group found that women suffering from high stress during the months and even years before conception -- defined as feeling overwhelmed and unable to cope -- had shorter pregnancies than other women. (2020-11-30)

The number of times a person gives birth may affect how quickly they age
Having children doesn't just make you feel like you've aged overnight -- a new study led by Penn State researchers found that the number of times a person gives birth may also affect the body's physical aging process. (2020-11-30)

Early birth linked to greater risk of hospital visits during childhood
Being born early (before 37 weeks' gestation) is associated with a higher risk of hospital admission throughout childhood than being born at full term (40 weeks' gestation), finds a study published by The BMJ today. (2020-11-25)

Study evaluates new World Health Organization Labor Care Guide for maternity care providers
The World Health Organization developed the new Labor Care Guide to support clinicians in providing good quality, women-centered care during labor and childbirth. In a study published in Birth, researchers evaluated the usability, feasibility, and acceptability of the new Labor Care Guide for maternity care providers in six countries. (2020-11-20)

Study finds low risk of pregnancy complications from COVID-19
Pregnant women who test positive for COVID-19 and their newborn babies have a low risk of developing severe symptoms, according to a new study from UT Southwestern. (2020-11-19)

Cesarean section-born children may face higher risk of infection-related hospitalization
Children born via cesarean section may be more likely to be hospitalized for infection during early childhood. A study published in PLOS Medicine by Jessica Miller at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Australia and colleagues suggests that compared to vaginally-born children, cesarean-born children may have a higher risk of infection-related hospitalization for up to five years of age. (2020-11-19)

Cesarean-born babies at increased risk of infection-related hospitalisation in childhood
Cesarean-born babies are at increased risk during early childhood of being hospitalised due to an infection, according to a new study of over seven million births from four countries. (2020-11-19)

Predicting preterm births
Researchers studied how family history can predict preterm birth. (2020-11-19)

Suicidal risk during pregnancy, after childbirth on the rise
The prevalence of suicidal thoughts and self-harm in the year before and after giving birth nearly tripled among childbearing people between 2006 and 2017, according to a new study. (2020-11-18)

Children born extremely preterm are more likely to be diagnosed with depression
A study using extensive nationwide registry data showed that girls born extremely preterm, earlier than 28 weeks gestational age, were three times more likely to be diagnosed with depression than peers born close to the expected date of delivery. Increased risk of depression also applied to girls and boys with poor fetal growth born full-term and post-term. The effects of poor fetal growth were more evident with increasing gestational age. (2020-11-12)

How will COVID-19 affect our next generation?
Exposure to COVID-19 could pose a risk to the health and aging of individuals who aren't even born yet, according to a newly published analysis. By the end of 2020, approximately 300,000 infants could be born to mothers infected by SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Millions more will be born into families who have experienced tremendous stress and upheaval due to the pandemic even if they haven't been infected themselves. (2020-11-12)

Born to be young?
The environment we experience in early-life is known to have major consequences on later-life health and lifespan. A new study led from the University of Turku in Finland using an avian model suggests that increased prenatal exposure to maternal thyroid hormones could have beneficial effects on the 'biological age' at birth. (2020-11-11)

COVID leads to measurable life expectancy drop in Spain, study finds
Spain's annual life expectancy at birth dropped by 0.9 years between 2019 and the annual period up until July 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study published this week in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sergi Trias-Llimos of the Center for Demographic Studies, Spain, and colleagues. (2020-11-11)

Age gates on alcohol websites are ineffective, Texas A&M research shows
''Age gates'' that aim to keep underage users off alcohol websites are mostly ineffective, a Texas A&M University alcohol researcher found. (2020-11-11)

Strenuous work during pregnancy increases likelihood of high birth weight
For the first time, researchers have attributed an understudied adverse fetal outcome to the strenuousness of an expectant mother's job. The study, 'Maternal and fetal health effects of working during pregnancy' is authored by Muzhe Yang, professor of economics at Lehigh University and Dhaval Dave, professor of economics at Bentley University, and has been published in the Review of Economics of the Household. (2020-11-10)

Severe COVID-19 infection rare in newborns
Severe COVID-19 infection appears rare in newborn babies, suggests a new study. (2020-11-09)

Safe pregnancy is possible for women with interstitial lung disease
A new study shows that women with interstitial lung disease (ILD) related to autoimmune disease may not need to terminate their pregnancies--despite the increased risk of adverse outcomes--provided they have close monitoring from their team of multidisciplinary physicians before, during and after pregnancy. Results of the research was presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology's annual meeting. (2020-11-06)

Expanded birth control coverage may help reduce disparities in unplanned pregnancies
Removing out-of-pocket costs for contraception may help reduce the income-related disparities that play such a significant role in unintended pregnancies, a new Michigan Medicine-led study suggests. (2020-11-06)

Do cesarean delivery's effects on birth hormones impact a newborn's neurodevelopment?
Cesarean section delivery and vaginal delivery lead to different hormonal exposures that may affect a newborn's development, according to an article published in the Journal of Neuroendocrinology. (2020-11-04)

Using artificial intelligence can improve pregnant women's health
Disorders such as congenital heart birth defects or macrosomia, gestational diabetes and preterm birth can be detected earlier when artificial intelligence is used. In the latter case, studies into cases involving artificial intelligence found a correlation between the number of pre-term births and the environmental pollution to which the pregnant women had been previously exposed. (2020-11-04)

Hormone differences
During birth, hormones in the body surge in both mother and baby, sent along by the nervous system. These stress hormones are there to spur delivery and to help a baby adapt to living outside the womb. A new study finds how one is born can have an effect on the amount of stress hormones released at the time of delivery. For example, vaginal delivery had the highest presence of birth signaling hormones. (2020-11-04)

Exposure to high temperatures linked to poor pregnancy outcomes
Exposure to high temperatures in pregnancy is associated with an increase in adverse pregnancy outcomes, especially preterm birth and stillbirth, and among women in lower socioeconomic groups, finds a study published by The BMJ today. (2020-11-04)

Higher risk of future fecal incontinence after sphincter injuries
The risk of subsequent fecal incontinence and intestinal gas leakage is significantly higher among women who, during childbirth, have suffered a sphincter injury and consequent damage to the anal sphincter muscle, was shown in a new study from the University of Gothenburg. (2020-11-02)

Mothers pass on allergies to offspring, Singapore preclinical study shows
Maternal antibodies primed to react to specific allergens can cross the placenta, passing on transiently allergic reactions to offspring, according to new preclinical research from a collaborative study by the Agency for Science, Technology and Research, KK Women's and Children's Hospital, and Duke-NUS Medical School in Singapore. The finding hints at why infants exhibit allergies so early in life and suggests possible targets for intervention. (2020-10-29)

Microbial strains show individualized patterns of stability in the developing infant gut
Microbial strain stability studies of human infants and children, ages shortly after birth (about 6 months) to 6 years, show individualized patterns of microbial strain specificity as the infant gut microbiomes developed. (2020-10-28)

Ontario should vaccinate newborns for hepatitis B, study suggests
Not all pregnant women are universally screened for hepatitis B virus (HBV) in Ontario, even though this screening is recommended, and the majority of those who test positive do not receive follow-up testing or interventions, leading to infections of newborns, found new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2020-10-26)

Poor women in Bangladesh reluctant to use healthcare
A study, published in PLOS ONE, found that the women living in Dhaka slums were reluctant to use institutionalised maternal health care for fear of having to make undocumented payments, unfamiliar institutional processes, lack of social and family support, matters of honour and shame, a culture of silence and inadequate spousal communication on health issues. (2020-10-23)

Fish exposed to even small amounts of estrogen produce fewer males
UC assistant professor Latonya Jackson conducted experiments with North American freshwater fish called least killifish. She found that fish exposed to estrogen in concentrations of 5 nanograms per liter in controlled lab conditions had fewer males and produced fewer offspring. Scientists have found estrogen at as much as 16 times that concentration in streams adjacent to sewage treatment plants. (2020-10-23)

How does the immune system develop in the first days of life?
Researchers highlight the anti-inflammatory response taking place after birth and designed to shield the newborn from infection. Early protection is ensured by the innate immunity through the rapid development of the complement pathway during the first week after birth. (2020-10-22)

Humans are born with brains 'prewired' to see words
Humans are born with a part of the brain that is prewired to be receptive to seeing words and letters, setting the stage at birth for people to learn how to read, a new study suggests. Analyzing brain scans of newborns, researchers found that this part of the brain - called the ''visual word form area'' (VWFA) - is connected to the language network of the brain. (2020-10-22)

The biological 'record' of extremely preterm birth differs in men and women
Researchers at McMaster University have found distinct effects of adversity early in life in the genomes of men compared to women who were born extremely preterm. (2020-10-20)

IVF success rates higher at clinics that provide more outcomes data
Success rates for in vitro fertilization are higher at clinics that voluntarily share more information than required by government regulators, according to new research by faculty at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. In a review of data reported between 2014 and 2017, CU researchers found that clinics that reported more data than required by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had higher rates of success in achieving pregnancy and birth. (2020-10-18)

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