Current Preterm Birth News and Events | Page 3

Current Preterm Birth News and Events, Preterm Birth News Articles.
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Big babies could be at higher risk of common heart rhythm disorder in adulthood
Elevated birth weight is linked with developing atrial fibrillation later in life, according to research presented at the 31st Great Wall International Congress of Cardiology (GW-ICC). (2020-10-18)

Consistent nursing care after childbirth boosts breastfeeding rates
New parents who receive attentive, supportive nursing care during labor and immediately after childbirth are more likely to exclusively breastfeed their newborn when leaving the hospital, finds a study published in MCN: The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing. (2020-10-15)

RUDN University doctors suggested ways to reduce obstetrical complications in endometriosis patients
A team of doctors from RUDN University with their Italian colleagues had studied the data of existing studies on the effect of endometriosis on pregnancy and childbirth and suggested ways to reduce obstetrical complications in women with this condition. (2020-10-14)

When reproductive rights are less restrictive, babies are born healthier
American women living in states with less restrictive reproductive rights policies are less likely to give birth to low-birth weight babies, according to a new study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier. The findings show that women, particularly US-born Black women, giving birth in states with less restrictive reproductive rights policies have a seven percent lower low-birth weight risk, compared to women in states with more restrictive policies. (2020-10-13)

Depression/anxiety in mums-to-be linked to heightened asthma risk in their kids
Depression and anxiety in mums-to-be is linked to a heightened risk of asthma and poorer lung function in their 10 year old children, finds research published online in the journal Thorax. (2020-10-12)

New bioengineering approach to fix fetal membranes
New research led by Queen Mary University of London and UCL has shown that small bioengineered molecules can be used to repair defects in the fetal membranes that surround and protect babies developing in the womb. (2020-10-12)

Prospective parents' mental health linked to premature births
Both a mother's and father's mental health are associated with increased risk that their baby will be born premature, a new study has found. (2020-10-12)

How an egg cell's "operating manual" sets the stage for fertility
Recently published work from Carnegie's Allan Spradling and Wanbao Niu revealed in unprecedented detail the genetic instructions immature egg cells go through step by step as they mature into functionality. Their findings improve our understanding of how ovaries maintain a female's fertility. (2020-10-08)

Women's expected longevity linked to age at birth of last child
CLEVELAND, Ohio --No one knows for sure how long they will live. A new study, however, suggests that leukocyte telomere length may offer some key insights into a woman's longevity and further demonstrates how maternal age at birth of last child affects telomere length and long-term health. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2020-10-07)

Neanderthals already had their characteristic barrel-shaped rib cages at birth
Neanderthal babies were born with the characteristic barrel-shaped rib cage shape previously identified in adult specimens, according to an analysis of digitally reconstructed rib cages from four Neanderthal infants. The findings suggest that Neanderthals' rib cages were already shorter and deeper than that of modern humans at birth, rather than shifting their shape. (2020-10-07)

Pregnancy complications linked to heightened risk of heart disease and stroke in later life
Pregnancy complications such as miscarriage, pre-eclampsia, diabetes in pregnancy (gestational diabetes) and pre-term birth are linked to a heightened risk of heart disease in later life, suggests an overarching (umbrella) analysis of data published by The BMJ today. (2020-10-07)

DNA test identifies genetic causes of severe fetal and newborn illness
A new study by University of California researchers shows the promise of high-throughput DNA-sequencing technologies to improve prenatal diagnosis and pregnancy outcomes for women who have experienced an abnormal prenatal ultrasound. (2020-10-07)

Expanded newborn screening could save premature infants' lives
Expanding routine newborn screening to include a metabolic vulnerability profile could lead to earlier detection of life-threatening complications in babies born preterm, according to a study by UC San Francisco researchers. The new method, which was developed at UCSF, offers valuable and time-sensitive insights into which infants are at greatest risk during their most vulnerable time, immediately after birth. (2020-10-06)

New method for in utero 4D imaging of baby hearts may aid diagnosis of congenital heart disease
Researchers at King's College London have developed a new method for helping detect congenital heart disease of a baby in pregnant mothers using MRI. Existing in-utero approaches are compromised by fetal motion, but the novel method corrects the motion to present 4D visualizations of the heart depicting major vessels and blood flow circulation. With further development, the method could become a new tool for aiding diagnosis of congenital heart disease where conventional methods like ultrasound might fail. (2020-10-05)

Exposure to vitamin D in the womb might minimize risk of high blood pressure for children born to mothers with preeclampsia
Children appear to be at greater risk of having high blood pressure when their mothers had the high blood pressure condition called preeclampsia during pregnancy--but this adverse association may be reduced or even eliminated for children who were exposed to higher levels of vitamin D in the womb. (2020-10-05)

Caesarean birth, prolonged labour influence infant gut bacteria, risk of childhood obesity
Events at birth may affect the microbes living in a baby's gut during the first few months of life, leading to a higher risk of childhood obesity and allergies, according to a new study published in the journal Gastroenterology. (2020-10-02)

Feeding C-section newborns their mother's poop may help build healthy microbiota
A paper published October 1, 2020 in the journal Cell suggests that newborns delivered by cesarean may benefit from drinking a small amount of their mother's feces dissolved in breast milk, because it provides them with beneficial bacteria they would otherwise be exposed to in vaginal birth. At three months, the procedure resulted in the newborns having a microbial makeup that looks more similar to babies born vaginally than to those born by C-section. (2020-10-01)

Fecal transplantation can restore the gut microbiota of C-section babies
Birth by Cesarean section is detrimental to normal gut microbiota development. Researchers demonstrated that the intestinal microbiota development can be restored by postnatal, orally-delivered transplantation of maternal fecal microbiota. (2020-10-01)

Marketing study investigates impact of Viagra TV ads on birth rates
Marketing researchers found that an increase in advertising of erectile dysfunction drugs contributed to more total births in Massachusetts. (2020-10-01)

Revealing the impacts of COVID-19 on unborn children
What are the risks to an unborn child if a woman contracts COVID-19 while pregnant, and how can doctors identify which pregnancies are at greater risk of adverse outcomes if a pregnant mother tests positive? A new study of 388 pregnancies in 22 different countries - the largest study of pregnant mothers with COVID-19 published to date - provides some answers to these questions. (2020-09-30)

Acid reflux drug could help newborn babies recover from brain injury, study suggests
Researchers in China have discovered a potential way to prevent a lack of oxygen or blood flow from causing long-lasting brain damage in newborn children. The study, which will be published September 29 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that targeting the histamine H2 receptor with drugs already used to treat acid reflux in infants could help newborns recover from hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), a condition that affects over 1 in 1,000 live births and can cause life-long neurological disabilities. (2020-09-29)

How zika virus degrades essential protein for neurological development via autophagy
Researchers at the University of Maryland (UMD) shed new light on how Zika virus hijacks our own cellular machinery to break down an essential protein for neurological development, getting it to ''eat itself''. By triggering this process known as autophagy, Zika virus is able to degrade an important protein, a process that may contribute to the development of neurological or brain deficiencies and congenital birth defects in the newborns of infected pregnant women. (2020-09-28)

Women could conceive after ovarian tumors
Women receiving fertility-sparing surgery for treatment of borderline ovarian tumours were able to have children, a study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in Fertility & Sterility shows. Natural fertility was preserved in most of them and only a small proportion required assisted reproductive treatment such as in vitro fertilization. Survival in the group was also as high as in women who had undergone radical surgical for treatment of similar tumours. (2020-09-25)

Greater father involvement in infant parenting is beneficial for paternal mental health
Fathers who are more involved in the parenting of an infant are less likely to experience depressive symptoms during the first year of parenthood. Time spent with the infant, parenting self-efficacy and material support predict depressive symptoms, and parenting self-efficacy predict risk of clinical depression. These results have important implications for development of interventions to assist fathers in parenting and improve paternal mental health, as well and for the implementation of policies like paid paternal leave. (2020-09-23)

SARS-CoV-2 during pregnancy was not associated with complications in neonates
In a new study published in the journal JAMA researchers at Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital have examined the association between a positive SARS-CoV-2 test during pregnancy and complications in mothers and their newborn babies. Almost two out of three pregnant women who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 were asymptomatic and the researchers found no higher prevalence of complications during delivery or of ill-health in the neonates. However, preeclampsia was more common in infected women. (2020-09-23)

Most infants are well even when moms are infected by COVID-19
Infants born to women with COVID-19 showed few adverse outcomes, according to the first report in the country of infant outcomes through eight weeks of age. The study, led by researchers at UC San Francisco, suggests that babies born to mothers infected with the virus generally do well six to eight weeks after birth, however there was a higher rate of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admissions reported if the mothers had COVID-19 up to two weeks prior to delivery. (2020-09-22)

Small increase in risk of autism seen for pre- and post-term births
A study of more than 3.5 million Nordic children suggests that the risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may increase slightly for each week a child is born before or after 40 weeks of gestation. Martina Persson of the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine. (2020-09-22)

Online training helps preemies
An international team of researchers has now found that computerised training can support preterm children's academic success. In their randomised controlled study ''Fit for School'', the researchers compared two learning apps. The project at the University Hospital Essen and at Ruhr-Universit├Ąt Bochum was funded by Mercator Research Center Ruhr (Mercur) with approximately 300,000 Euros for four years. Results have been published online as unedited manuscript in the journal Pediatric Research on 12 September 2020. (2020-09-21)

Adverse pregnancy outcomes, risk of cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women
This observational study looked at whether adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preterm delivery, gestational diabetes and low birth weight are associated with an increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women, independent of traditional risk factors. (2020-09-16)

Rural counties with access to obstetrics have healthier infant birth outcomes
This study does not prove a causal link between access to obstetrical care and infant health outcomes, but it does suggest that obstetrical access may play a role in these disparities. These findings have broader implications for the more than half of all rural counties in the United States that do not have access to hospital-based obstetrical care. (2020-09-15)

Immune cells sculpt circuits in the brain
Brain immune cells, called microglia, protect the brain from infection and inflammation. It turns out that they also sculpt circuits in the developing brain in response to sensory cues. (2020-09-14)

Healthy diet and exercise during pregnancy could lead to healthier children, study finds
New research shows improving the lifestyle of women with obesity during pregnancy could mean long-term cardiovascular benefits for their children. (2020-09-11)

Antibiotics affect breast milk microbiota in mothers of preterm infants: University of Toronto study
A team led by researchers at the University of Toronto and The Hospital for Sick Children has found that mothers of preterm babies have highly individual breast milk microbiomes, and that even short courses of antibiotics have prolonged effects on the diversity and abundance of microbes in their milk. (2020-09-03)

Pregnant women with COVID-19 may more likely need intensive care and give birth early
Pregnant women seen in hospitals with covid-19 are less likely to show symptoms, and seem to be at increased risk of needing admission to an intensive care unit than non-pregnant women of similar age, finds a study published by The BMJ today. (2020-09-01)

Weight in first years of life can affect lung health in later childhood
Study of more than 1,200 children analyses body mass index trajectories from birth to age four years and their relationship to lung function at age seven years (2020-08-27)

'Oral' bacteria may disrupt the balance of the vaginal microbiome
A study published in PLOS Biology by Amanda Lewis at University of California, San Diego, and colleagues suggests that mutually beneficial relationships between different species of vaginal bacteria may encourage growth of potentially harmful pathogens, such as the common oral bacterium Fusobacterium nucleatum. The work challenges the belief that a suitable living environment supporting pathogen colonization is created solely by the absence of healthy bacteria, and may explain prior clinical links between oral sex and bacterial vaginosis (BV). (2020-08-25)

Defiance and low trust in medical doctors related to vaccine scepticism
A new study shows that individuals who react negatively to rules and recommendations and have lower trust in doctors more often use complementary and alternative medicine, that is, treatments or substances that are not included in the care offered or recommended by doctors. The study included altogether 770 parents of young children. (2020-08-20)

Researchers predict deficits in female birth numbers in India over coming decades
Between 2017 and 2030, an estimated 6.8 million fewer female births will be recorded in India than would be by chance, due to sex-selective abortions, according to a new study published August 19, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Fengqing Chao of King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Saudi Arabia, and colleagues. (2020-08-19)

Premature delivery linked to heightened risk of early death for mothers
Preterm and early term delivery are independent risk factors for premature death in women up to 40 years later, finds a study from Sweden published by The BMJ today. (2020-08-19)

Historical redlining linked to premature births, lower birth weight babies
Adverse birth outcomes -- including premature births, low birth weight babies and babies who are small for their gestational age -- are more likely to occur in neighborhoods that were once redlined, finds a new study by University of California, Berkeley, researchers. The results indicate that past discriminatory housing practices may be partly to blame for the disparities in infant and maternal health faced by people of color in the US. (2020-08-14)

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