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Current Preterm Infants News and Events, Preterm Infants News Articles.
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NIH-led workshop addresses opioid misuse during pregnancy
Research is essential to determining how best to screen pregnant women for opioid use disorder, to treat pregnant women who have the disorder, and to care for infants as they experience withdrawal symptoms, according to experts convened for a National Institutes of Health workshop in April 2016. A summary of the workshop, co-sponsored by NIH's Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), appears in the online issue of Obstetrics and Gynecology. (2017-06-09)

Infants born preterm may lack key lung cells later in life
Mice born into an oxygen-rich environment respond worse to the flu once fully grown due to an absence of certain lung cells, a discovery that provides a potential explanation for preterm infants' added susceptibility to influenza and other lung diseases later in their lives, according to new research from the University of Rochester Medical Center. (2017-06-09)

Study finds delayed food introduction increases risk of sensitization
Using data from more than 2,100 Canadian children, the researchers found that infants who avoided cow's milk products in their first year were nearly four times as likely to be sensitized to cow's milk compared to infants who consumed cow's milk products before 12 months of age. Similarly, infants who avoided egg or peanut in their first year were nearly twice as likely to be sensitized to those foods compared to infants who consumed them before 12 months of age. (2017-06-08)

Bitter taste receptors may hold the key to managing preterm labor
This could be good news for those trying to prevent preterm labor: New research published online in The FASEB Journal suggests that exposing bitter taste receptors in the uterus to certain substances can stop many unwanted contractions that occur during premature labor. (2017-06-08)

Risk of cardiac malformations from lithium during pregnancy less significant
New research suggests there may be a more modest increased risk of cardiac defects when using lithium during the first trimester of pregnancy. (2017-06-07)

Neuroimaging technique may help predict autism among high-risk infants
Functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) may predict which high-risk, 6-month old infants will develop autism spectrum disorder by age 2 years, according to a study funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), two components of the National Institutes of Health. The study is published in the June 7, 2017, issue of Science Translational Medicine. (2017-06-07)

Detecting autism in infants before symptoms emerge
According to the results of a new study, a brain scan can detect functional changes in babies as young as six months of age that predicts later diagnosis with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). (2017-06-07)

Study reveals level of magnesium sulfate to prevent cerebral palsy in preterm infants
A new study suggests that to optimize neuroprotection and prevent cerebral palsy in extremely preterm infants, women should receive magnesium sulfate to obtain a blood level between 3.7 and 4.4 mg/dL at the time of delivery. (2017-06-07)

What causes women to stop breastfeeding early?
A recent systematic literature review has investigated potential sociodemographic, physical, mental, and social factors that may cause breastfeeding mothers to stop breastfeeding before infants reach 6 months of age. (2017-06-07)

Weight gain greater, less than recommended during pregnancy linked with increased risk of adverse outcomes
In an analysis that included more than 1.3 million pregnancies, weight gain during pregnancy that was greater or less than guideline recommendations was associated with a higher risk of adverse outcomes for mothers and infants, compared with weight gain within recommended levels, according to a study published by JAMA. (2017-06-06)

Baby sleeping in same room associated with less sleep, unsafe sleep habits
The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends parents keep babies in the same room with them to sleep for the first year to prevent sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). But room sharing between babies and mothers beyond the first four months is associated with less sleep for babies and unsafe sleeping practices that the AAP is hoping to prevent, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. (2017-06-05)

New clinical data demonstrate safety and tolerability of activated B. infantis
Evolve BioSystems, Inc., a microbiome company committed to developing novel solutions to restore and maintain a healthy newborn gut microbiome, today announced Phase I clinical trial data demonstrating the safety and tolerability of supplementation with an activated form of the beneficial bacteria Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis) in breastfed infants. (2017-06-05)

Ethnicity and breastfeeding influence infant gut bacteria
This study looked at the microbial population in the gastrointestinal tract of infants at a formative stage of life when metabolic set points are being established. The study analyzed the stool samples from 173 white Caucasian and 182 South Asian one-year-olds recruited from two birth cohort studies. (2017-06-01)

Taking antidepressants during pregnancy not associated with neonatal problems at 2-4 weeks
Babies exposed to an antidepressant or a mood disorder during fetal life did not have any more signs of irritability, difficulty feeding, sleep disturbances and respiratory problems two to four weeks after birth than babies who were not exposed. Instead, the major factor associated with newborn problems was preterm birth, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. (2017-06-01)

A mother's age doesn't matter
A mother's advanced age at childbirth is not the reason for the elevated risks of low birth weight or preterm birth -- such risks may instead be related to individual circumstances and behavioral patterns of the mother. (2017-06-01)

First Nations, Inuit babies hospitalized more often in first year of life
First Nations and Inuit babies were hospitalized much more often in the first year of life compared with non-Indigenous babies, many for preventable illnesses, found a new study of infant hospitalizations in Quebec, Canada, published in CMAJ. (2017-05-29)

Marmoset monkeys learn to call the same way human infants learn to babble
Human social groups have a strange tendency to share responsibility for taking care of infants; parents, older siblings, and other adult relatives all help to nurture babies. The only other primates that take care of infants this way are marmosets, a group of small, highly social monkeys from South America. In another striking parallel to humans, infant marmosets also benefit from frequent feedback while learning their vocal calls, researchers report in Current Biology. (2017-05-25)

Making biological drugs with spider silk protein
Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have managed to synthesise lung surfactant, a drug used in the care of preterm babies, by mimicking the production of spider silk. Animal studies reveal it to be just as effective as the biological drugs currently in clinical use. The study is published in Nature Communications. (2017-05-23)

Preterm birth linked to higher risk of heart failure
Babies born preterm run a higher risk of heart failure during childhood and adolescence than those born at full term, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report. The registry-based study is published in The Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC). (2017-05-22)

Extreme preterm infant death or disease may be predicted by biomarker
Tests of cells collected from the umbilical cord blood vessel walls at birth can predict death or poor pulmonary outcomes in extremely preterm infants, say researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. (2017-05-22)

Rotavirus vaccination in infants and young children
Rotaviruses (RV) are the commonest cause of diarrhea in infants and young children worldwide. To protect against rotavirus infection, in 2013 the Standing Committee on Vaccination (STIKO, Ständige Impfkommission) in Germany recommended rotavirus vaccination for all infants. According to current studies, the efficacy of the vaccines in use may be regarded as very high. (2017-05-22)

Viral ARIs in infants may lead to recurrent childhood wheezing
Viral acute respiratory infections (ARIs) may lead to oxidative stress in some infants, and play a major role in the development of recurrent wheezing in early childhood, according to a new study presented at the 2017 American Thoracic Society International Conference. Oxidative stress is an imbalance between the production of free radicals (atoms that can cause cellular damage in the body) and the ability of the body to counteract their harmful effects through neutralization by antioxidants. (2017-05-22)

Temple study shows baby boxes & sleep education reduced bed-sharing in 1st week of infancy
Bed-sharing, the unsafe practice in which parents sleep in the same bed as their babies, is associated with sleep-related deaths in infants, including sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed. Researchers at Temple University Hospital have now found that face-to-face postpartum education about safe infant sleep, combined with the distribution of a baby box, a cardboard bassinet, reduced the rates of bed-sharing during babies' first 8 days of life. (2017-05-22)

Analysis examines safety of antidepressant use during pregnancy
Use of fluoxetine -- the most commonly prescribed antidepressant -- during pregnancy is linked with a slightly increased risk of malformations in infants, according to a recent analysis of published studies. (2017-05-17)

Corticosteroid treatment increases survival of preterm infants within hours
The effects of corticosteroid treatments on pregnant women facing preterm delivery to prevent infant death and morbidity have been thought to develop gradually over days. However, a new study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet and colleagues in the European EPICE project -- coordinated by Inserm, Paris -- suggests that survival and health gains for very preterm infants may occur within hours. (2017-05-15)

Hepatitis C increasing among pregnant women
Hepatitis C infections among pregnant women nearly doubled from 2009-2014, likely a consequence of the country's increasing opioid epidemic that is disproportionately affecting rural areas of states including Tennessee and West Virginia. (2017-05-11)

Breast-feeding's role in 'seeding' infant microbiome
UCLA-led study finds that 30 percent of the beneficial bacteria in a baby's intestinal tract come directly from mother's milk, and an additional 10 percent comes from skin on the mother's breast. (2017-05-08)

Study suggests omega-3 in mothers' diets may lower children's risk of type 1 diabetes
New research published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes [EASD]) suggests that omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), derived primarily from fish in maternal diet during pregnancy or lactation, may help protect infants at high risk of type 1 diabetes (T1D) from developing the disease. (2017-05-04)

Queen's research shows illegal levels of arsenic found in baby foods
Researchers from Queen's University Belfast have found that almost half of baby rice food products contain illegal levels of inorganic arsenic despite new regulations set by the EU. (2017-05-04)

Breast milk appears to aid white matter microstructural organization in preemies
To the growing list of reasons why mothers should consider breast-feeding infants, add another: Critical white matter structures in the brains of babies who are born so prematurely that they weigh less than 1,500 grams develop more robustly when their mothers breast-feed them, compared with preemie peers who are fed formula. (2017-05-04)

Surprise communication found between brain regions involved in infant motor control
A team of University of Iowa researches has discovered a new connection between two regions of the brain that may help explain how motor skills develop. Working with infant rats, the scientists found that the hippocampus and the red nucleus, part of the brain stem, synchronize during REM sleep. Findings published in the journal Current Biology. (2017-05-04)

Study examines 'small for gestational age' across European countries
A new study questions the use of common references for assessing 'small for gestational age' (SGA) in very preterm infants across Europe. SGA describes a baby who is smaller than the usual amount for the number of weeks of pregnancy. (2017-05-04)

Buprenorphine cuts length of stay nearly in half for infants withdrawing from opioids
A research team from Thomas Jefferson University published research finding buprenorphine cuts length of stay nearly in half for infants withdrawing from opioids. The finding is likely to change practice in neonatal intensive care units internationally. (2017-05-04)

Alternative treatment approach for neonatal abstinence syndrome may shorten hospital stay
New research suggests a revamped, 'common sense' approach to treating newborns suffering opioid withdrawal -- gauging whether the baby can eat, sleep and be consoled within 10 minutes before administering drugs to wean them off exposure -- may safely reduce the length of hospitalization they need. (2017-05-04)

Study finds infants prescribed antacids have increased risk of fractures during childhood
New research being presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting found infants prescribed antacids to manage acid reflux, or spitting up, under age 1 had more bone fractures later in childhood. (2017-05-04)

Reading with children starting in infancy gives lasting literacy boost
New research at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting shows that reading books with a child beginning in early infancy can boost vocabulary and reading skills four years later, before the start of elementary school. (2017-05-04)

Handheld screen time linked with speech delays in young children
As the number of smart phones, tablets, electronic games and other handheld screens in US homes continues to grow, some children begin using these devices before beginning to talk. New research being presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting suggests these children may be at higher risk for speech delays. (2017-05-04)

Buprenorphine cuts neonatal abstinence syndrome treatment length by nearly half
Findings of a phase 3 clinical trial being presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting show that buprenorphine is just as safe and more effective than morphine when used to treat newborns suffering withdrawal symptoms after prenatal drug exposure. (2017-05-04)

Genetic finding may allow doctors to predict newborn health during pregnancy
UCLA scientists have discovered specific genetic changes in the placentas of women who gave birth to growth-restricted infants. (2017-05-02)

Study shows link between maternal marijuana use and low birth weight
Researchers at Lawson Health Research Institute, Western University and Brescia University College found that women who used marijuana while pregnant were almost three times more likely to have an infant with low birth weight. It is the first large-scale study in Canada to show this association between maternal marijuana use and low birth weight infants. (2017-04-27)

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