Current Preventive Medicine News and Events

Current Preventive Medicine News and Events, Preventive Medicine News Articles.
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Study finds COVID risk communication targeting younger adults may have biggest impact
A study of adults in the United States finds that - broadly speaking - the older you are, the more concerned you are about COVID-19, and the more steps you take to reduce your risk from COVID-19. The study suggests that the biggest boost in risk reduction would stem from communication efforts aimed at raising awareness of COVID-19 risks among U.S. adults under the age of 40. (2021-02-23)

A fifth of adults in Sweden report dental anxiety
In Sweden, approximately one in five adults suffers from dental anxiety or phobia. The number has decreased over time, but still an important part of the population have major problems, according to a recent doctoral thesis from the University of Gothenburg. (2021-02-22)

Mother's heart health in pregnancy impacts child's heart health in adolescence
A mother's heart health while she is pregnant may have a significant impact on her child's cardiovascular health in early adolescence (ages 10 to 14), according to a new study. It is the first study to examine the implications of a mother's cardiovascular health during pregnancy for offspring health in the longer term. (2021-02-16)

Parents Say COVID-19 has disrupted children's dental care
A third of parents say the COVID-19 pandemic has made it difficult to get dental care for their children, a new national poll suggests. But some families may face greater challenges than others. (2021-02-15)

Instant death from heart attack more common in people who do not exercise
An active lifestyle is linked with a lower chance of dying immediately from a heart attack, according to a study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). Heart disease is the leading cause of death globally and prevention is a major public health priority. (2021-02-12)

New AI tool can thwart coronavirus mutations
USC computer scientists used AI to create a new tool that rapidly identifies potential solutions to coronavirus mutations and screens vaccines much faster to give humans an advantage over the contagion. (2021-02-05)

Adolescent involvement with firearms linked to gun violence in adulthood
A new study by Northwestern University researchers finds involvement with firearms by high-risk youth is associated with firearm violence during adulthood. 'Association of Firearm Access, Use, and Victimization During Adolescence with Firearm Perpetration During Adulthood in a 16-year Longitudinal Study of Youth Involved in the Juvenile Justice System' will publish in JAMA Network Open at 10 a.m. CST, Thursday, Feb. 4. (2021-02-04)

USPSTF recommends against screening for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis in general population
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends against screening for asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis in the general adult population. Carotid artery stenosis is the narrowing of arteries that supply blood to the brain. This recommendation applies to adults without a history of transient ischemic attack, stroke or other neurologic signs or symptoms related to the carotid arteries. (2021-02-02)

An integrated approach for an effective prevention of Alzheimer´s disease
Recent studies demonstrate that styles of life involving interdependent actions of exercise, oriental practices such as QiGong, nutrition, mental and social activity and mindfulness are effective in preventing Alzheimer´s disease and other forms of dementia (2021-02-01)

Increase in minimum wage will save infant lives, study shows
A new study published recently by researchers from Syracuse University shows that a higher minimum wage will reduce infant deaths. (2021-01-26)

Survey: Frequent reports of missed medical care in US adults during the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic
Two out of five individuals delayed or missed medical care in the early phase of the pandemic--from March through mid-July 2020. (2021-01-21)

Incentivizing vaccine adherence: could it be the key to achieving herd immunity?
To achieve success, experts estimate that at least 70 to 90 percent of the population must be inoculated with a COVID-19 vaccine to achieve herd immunity, but how can we ensure folks will voluntarily receive a vaccine? An examination of scientific evidence on incentivizing vaccine adherence found that modest financial incentives resulted in as much as a 7-fold increase in adherence compared to no incentives. (2021-01-20)

Inpatient mammograms can reduce disparities in breast cancer screening rates
Inpatient mammograms are a feasible approach to deliver preventive care to hospitalized women who may face significant barriers to completing the test in the outpatient setting. (2021-01-13)

Fewer patient encounters drive decline in total primary care office visits
Despite seeing gains in insurance coverage for preventive health services under the Affordable Care Act, the US has seen a declining rate of primary care visits over the past fifteen years. Are fewer individuals seeing primary care physicians? (2021-01-12)

How has the COVID-19 pandemic affected measles vaccination rates?
In a recent study published in Pediatrics, researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital evaluated changes in measles vaccination rates from before the pandemic to this summer, when return for clinical care was encouraged. Finding a steep and lasting decline, the researchers are making efforts to improve timely vaccination and provide safe catch-up opportunities to children in their pediatric primary care network. (2020-12-17)

USPSTF statement on screening for hepatitis B virus infection in adolescents, adults
The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening for hepatitis B virus infection in adolescents and adults at increased risk for infection.  (2020-12-15)

Health care workers' COVID infections driven mainly by community exposure
In a well-resourced health system with adequate PPE, health care worker risk for SARS-CoV-2 infection was more strongly driven by community exposure than patient exposure early in the pandemic, reports a new study. The study of 6,510 health care workers is the largest systematically collected cohort study of health care worker risk for SARS CoV-2 in the U.S. Nurses were the only occupation group with higher risks once community exposure was accounted for. (2020-12-09)

COVID-19 pandemic responsible for decrease in hepatitis C testing
New research from Boston Medical Center finds that the COVID-19 emergency systemic changes made to decrease in-person visits during the pandemic have led to a decrease in hospital-wide Hepatitis C (HCV) testing by 50 percent, and a reduction in new HCV diagnoses by more than 60 percent. (2020-12-04)

USPSTF recommendation on behavioral counseling to promote healthy diet, activity for adults with risk of CVD
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends offering or referring adults with cardiovascular disease risk factors to behavioral counseling interventions to promote a healthy diet and physical activity. (2020-11-24)

Most type 2 diabetes patients are at high risk of a fatal heart attack or stroke
'The most striking result of our study was that the vast majority of patients (93%) had a high or very high risk of fatal events within a decade. Half of patients in the very high-risk group had no history of heart disease, meaning they would not be receiving medications to prevent heart attacks and strokes,' said study author Dr. Manel Mata-Cases, a general practitioner for the Catalan Institute of Health in Sant Adrià de Besòs. (2020-11-13)

Increased early-stage cancer diagnoses tied to ACA's Medicaid expansion, Pitt study finds
The study showed that health insurance expansions increased early-stage cancer diagnoses, while rates of late-stage cancer decreased. (2020-11-12)

The young resumed risky behaviors earlier than the elderly as COVID-19 pandemic dragged on
Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, old and young individuals did not differ in taking precautions, but over time, older people quickly adopted preventive behaviors and they engaged in more preventive behaviors. Older people engaged in fewer risky behaviors relative to younger people on month after the beginning of the pandemic and this age difference persisted over time; both young and older people started engaging in more potentially risky behaviors. (2020-11-11)

Researchers find evidence of pandemic fatigue
A new study from the USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology shows that the behavioral responses to COVID-19 differed by age. The research, led by Jung Ki Kim, research associate professor at the USC Leonard Davis School, examined how age affected the practice of preventive and risky behaviors in response to COVID-19 and how these behaviors changed over the first three months of the pandemic. (2020-11-11)

USPSTF statement on screening for high blood pressure in children, adolescents
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to make a recommendation about screening for high blood pressure in children and adolescents. High blood pressure (both primary and secondary) occurs in 3 to 4 percent of children and adolescents in the United States. (2020-11-10)

Six ways primary care "medical homes" are lowering health care spending
New analysis of 394 U.S. primary care practices identifies the aspects of care delivery that are associated with lower health care spending and lower utilization of emergency care and hospital admissions. (2020-11-10)

Mothers' lifestyle predicts when offspring will have first heart attack or stroke
Offspring of mothers with heart healthy lifestyles live nearly a decade longer without cardiovascular disease than those whose mothers have unhealthy lifestyles. That's the finding of a study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).''Our study suggests that mothers are the primary gatekeepers of their children's health,'' said study author Dr. James Muchira of Vanderbilt University, Nashville and the University of Massachusetts, Boston. (2020-11-04)

Remdesivir for COVID-19: FDA approved but still unproven
In a review of evidence from the most reliable data from randomized trials to find likely small-to-moderate effects of remdesivir, researchers say that totality of evidence compiled before the WHO trial results justifies compassionate use of remdesivir for severely ill patients. A smaller trial in China showed significantly decreased mean recovery time but no suggestion of a mortality benefit. ACTT-1 found the same mean recovery time and a suggestion of a mortality benefit that didn't achieve statistical significance. (2020-10-29)

Dartmouth study examines well water testing promotion in pediatric primary care
Findings from a new study conducted by a team of researchers at Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine and published in the journal Preventive Medicine Reports, show that involving pediatric practices in the promotion of private well water testing can influence parental compliance. (2020-10-26)

Study: Malaria-preventive drugs dramatically reduce infections in school children
Use of preventive antimalarial treatments reduces by half the number of malaria infections among schoolchildren, according to a new analysis published today in The Lancet Global Health. (2020-10-22)

Preventive drugs halve malaria cases in African schoolchildren
Giving preventive drugs to school-age children in Africa substantially reduces malaria infections and cases of anaemia, according to a new study in The Lancet Global Health. (2020-10-22)

How fear encourages physical distancing during pandemic
Despite guidelines plastered on the walls and floors of grocery and retail stores encouraging customers to maintain six-feet of physical distance during the pandemic, many do not. A new study by researchers at the Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management identifies two key messaging components that could improve the persuasiveness of those appeals and trigger compliance. (2020-10-21)

New study highlights the role of risk communication in coping with COVID-19
New research from the International Joint Laboratory of Cognitive and Behavioural Scienc (iLCBC) at ZZNU demonstrates the importance of risk communication aimed at encouraging appropriate countermeasures against virus outbreaks. (2020-10-16)

Act now on wildfires, global climate change, human health, study says
Immediate actions are needed to limit the greenhouse gas emissions that are driving climate change that helps fuel wildfires, a Monash University study says. (2020-10-13)

New study shows which medical procedures pose COVID-19 risk to health-care providers
Autopsy, airway suctioning and cardiopulmonary resuscitation are among the list of medical procedures that pose a risk of spreading COVID-19 from a patient to their health-care provider by creating aerosols, according to new research published in the journal BMJ Open Respiratory Research. The team, led by UAlberta medicine professor Sebastian Straube, carried out a systematic review of public health guidelines, research papers and policy documents from around the globe to determine which procedures are classified as aerosol-generating. (2020-10-13)

US viewer preference for right-wing TV media linked to fewer preventive measures against COVID-19
Viewer preference for right-wing US TV media is linked to significantly fewer preventive measures against COVID-19 and behaviours likely to increase the risk of infection, finds research published in the online journal BMJ Global Health. (2020-10-08)

Testing for a lipoprotein linked to heart risk is as effective as blood work
Elevated levels of a little-known lipoprotein in the blood that may put people at high risk of cardiovascular disease can be as accurately detected by genetic testing as by conventional laboratory measurement. (2020-10-06)

New study finds largest population increase among US adult electronic cigarette users is in younger adults that have never smoked combustible cigarettes
A new study from the American Cancer Society assessed trends between 2014 and 2018 in the prevalence of e-cigarette use and population count of e-cigarette users, according to combustible cigarette smoking histories, in younger (18-29 years), middle-aged (30-49 years), and older (?50 years.) U.S. adults. (2020-10-05)

COVID-19: Social dilemmas about protective measures
We need to understand how protective actions against contagious diseases are adopted to define the correct preventive approaches. A research team of the University of Geneva collected data about the adoption of protective measures. They analysed how the behaviour of others influences individual decision-making. The people least likely to adopt these measures are those who believe that the precautions taken by others mean that they do not need to take their own. (2020-10-02)

Hydroxychloroquine no more effective than placebo in preventing COVID-19
Clinical trial with COVID-19 testing of participants shows health care workers in contact with coronavirus patients who took hydroxychloroquine each day did not reduce their rate of infection. (2020-09-30)

Reasons for football injuries
If professional footballers are out of action due to injuries, this can have serious consequences for the club. However, in order to avoid injuries, it is important to know how exactly and in which situations these injuries typically occur. A research team from the Faculty of Sport Science at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) and the German statutory accident insurance VBG (Department for Sports Injury Prevention) has used videos to analyse moderate and severe injuries among professional footballers. (2020-09-24)

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