Current Preventive Medicine News and Events | Page 2

Current Preventive Medicine News and Events, Preventive Medicine News Articles.
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Genetic analysis links obesity to higher rheumatoid arthritis risk
An analysis of genetic data collected from more than 850,000 individuals of European ancestry has found a link between obesity-related genes and rheumatoid arthritis. (2020-09-23)

Study finds lung transplant patients not given antifungal preventive drugs have higher risk of death
Antifungal preventive medications reduce mortality risk by half in the first year following lung transplantation, according to Mayo Clinic research involving 667 patients who received lung transplants from 2005 to 2018. (2020-09-23)

UK's preventive measures to shield homeless people from COVID-19 have prevented hundreds of deaths
Timely preventive measures against COVID-19 such as providing hotel room accommodation for homeless people in the UK are estimated to have prevented hundreds of deaths in this vulnerable population, according to research presented at this week's ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online 23-25 September) and published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine . (2020-09-23)

The impact of COVID-19 on access to Parkinson's disease medication
A global survey of health professionals has shown that during the COVID-19 pandemic, patients with Parkinson's disease in large parts of Asia, Africa, and Latin and South America experienced difficulty in accessing their medication, which is likely to have led to deterioration of symptom control. (2020-09-21)

Many practitioners are not prescribing HIV prevention medication, study finds
Only about 54% of medical practitioners surveyed say they have prescribed pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, to HIV-vulnerable patients, according to a new study by a Vanderbilt University Medical Center investigator. (2020-09-17)

Vitamin B1 deficiency a key factor in the development of alcohol-related dementia
A research group led by Stephan Listabarth from MedUni Vienna's Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Division of Social Psychiatry, has now developed a hypothesis whereby iron deposits in the brain -- resulting from alcohol-induced vitamin B1 deficiency -- can be regarded as key factors in cognitive decline. (2020-09-09)

IoT results-oriented exercise system for social distancing with field sensors, no gym needed
An IoT system that allows geneticists, nutritionists, clinicians and exercise physiologists to work together remotely encourages middle-aged and elderly people to train using Interval Walking Training, in accordance to their individual peak aerobic capacity, greatly improving their physical fitness and lifestyle-related disease prognosis. (2020-09-03)

Elderly people protected against respiratory infections by BCG vaccine
The BCG vaccine has a broad, stimulating effect on the immune system. This gives it an effective preventive action against various infections - possibly also against COVID-19. New studies are investigating that. BCG is frequently given to children, but a double-blind randomized clinical study, a collaboration between Radboud university medical center and the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens shows that elderly people also benefit from it. The results are published in Cell. (2020-09-01)

Risk of heart attacks halves in patients with diabetes in 15 years
Dramatic reductions in the risk of heart attacks in patients with diabetes coincides with major increases in the use of preventive medications. That's the finding of late breaking research presented today at ESC Congress 2020. 'Our results suggest that when patients are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, starting medications to prevent cardiovascular disease has a substantial impact on the risk of heart attacks and premature death,' said principal investigator Dr. Christine Gyldenkerne of Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. (2020-08-29)

New surgical approach for women at risk of ovarian cancer
A new two-stage surgical approach for cancer prevention is highly acceptable among premenopausal women at high risk of ovarian cancer, according to research led by Queen Mary University of London. (2020-08-24)

Heart failure, hypertensive deaths rise in black women and men
Deaths due to heart failure and hypertensive heart disease are increasing in the US -- particularly in Black women and men -- despite medical and surgical advances in heart disease management. This is the first comprehensive study to look across a spectrum of heart disease types and examine differences between sex and racial groups across age groups and geography. (2020-08-20)

USPSTF recommendation on behavioral counseling to prevent sexually transmitted infections
The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends behavioral counseling to prevent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) for all sexually active adolescents and for adults at increased risk. Sexually transmitted infections are on the rise across the United States, with approximately 20 million new cases each year. (2020-08-18)

New study: Hydroxychloroquine ineffective as a preventive antiviral against COVID-19
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University have added to the growing body of understanding about how hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is not a possible defense against COVID-19. Specifically, they found that HCQ is not effective in preventing COVID-19 in patients with lupus and rheumatoid arthritis (RA), suggesting a broader interpretation of HCQ as ineffective preventive medicine for the general population. Their findings were recently published in the Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases. (2020-08-17)

Study explores the association of malaria, HIV with anemia during pregnancy
Pregnant women from sub-Saharan Africa with malaria and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have a higher prevalence of anemia than pregnant women without infections, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. The findings may have implications for reducing the risk of death in pregnant women and preventing low birth weights and neurocognitive impairment in their children as a result of anemia. (2020-08-14)

Age, education, and surgical history affect hormone use after oophorectomy
CLEVELAND, Ohio (August 12, 2020)--Removal of the ovaries before natural menopause (surgical menopause) often exacerbates menopause symptoms and places women at increased risk for heart disease, osteoporosis, and cognitive decline. A new study identified the frequency of hormone therapy (HT) use and factors that determine who is more likely to use hormones after oophorectomy to manage symptoms. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2020-08-12)

AI-enhanced precision medicine identifies novel autism subtype
A novel precision medicine approach enhanced by artificial intelligence has laid the groundwork for what could be the first biomedical screening and intervention tool for a subtype of autism, reports a new study. The approach is believed to be the first of its kind. Today, autism is diagnosed based only on symptoms and by the time a physician identifies it, it's often when early and critical brain developmental windows have passed without appropriate intervention. This discovery could shift that paradigm. (2020-08-10)

Children's pester power a future target for interventions
Children's pester power may contribute to improvements in their family's food environments. A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, highlights the potential for children to influence food consumption and habits at home. (2020-08-06)

Young women with polycystic ovary syndrome have raised risk of heart disease
Women in their 30s and 40s with a common condition affecting how the ovaries work are more likely to get heart disease. That's the finding of a study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). ''Polycystic ovary syndrome isn't a life sentence - there are many ways to stay heart healthy,'' said study author Dr. Clare Oliver-Williams of the University of Cambridge, UK. (2020-08-02)

Vaping linked with heart problems
In adolescents the use of e-cigarettes doubles the risk of starting to smoke traditional cigarettes, states a position paper published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). ''Vaping is marketed towards teenagers and the tobacco industry uses celebrities to promote it as being healthier than smoking,'' said senior author Professor Maja-Lisa Løchen of UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø. (2020-07-29)

What's the best way to estimate and track COVID-19 mortality?
When used correctly, the symptomatic case fatality ratio (sCFR) and the infection fatality ratio (IFR) are better measures by which to monitor COVID-19 epidemics than the commonly reported case fatality ratio (CFR), according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Anthony Hauser of the University of Bern, Switzerland, and colleagues. (2020-07-28)

High-deductible health plans and major cardiovascular outcomes
In the first study to examine the association between high out-of-pocket costs and adverse cardiovascular events, research led by the Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute finds that individuals with cardiovascular disease risk factors who switched to high-deductible health plans (HDHPs) did not experience increased risk of heart attack or stroke. The study, ''Association Between Switching to a High-deductible Health Plan and Major Cardiovascular Outcomes'' appears in JAMA Network Open on July 24. (2020-07-24)

Chocolate is good for the heart
Eating chocolate at least once a week is linked with a reduced risk of heart disease, according to research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).1 ''Our study suggests that chocolate helps keep the heart's blood vessels healthy,'' said study author Dr. Chayakrit Krittanawong of Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. (2020-07-22)

AJTMH July updates
Below is an update of COVID-19 articles published in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (AJTMH). We've highlighted below those that we think may of interest for your reporting. (2020-07-22)

Opium linked with more deaths after bypass surgery
The largest study on opium use and outcomes after bypass surgery has found that - in contrast to widely held beliefs - it is linked with more deaths and heart attacks. The research is published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime estimates that in 2015, 17.7 million people used opiates (opium, heroin, and morphine) illicitly worldwide. (2020-07-16)

New, remote weight-loss method helped slash pounds
A new Northwestern Medicine remote weight-loss program, called Opt-IN, provides maximum weight loss for the lowest cost and with much less hassle than the gold-standard National Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), the most successful behavioral non-drug treatment currently available. According to a new study, the Opt-IN program helped participants in a clinical trial lose 11 to 13 pounds, which is equivalent to the DPP's success rate. (2020-07-14)

New guideline: Don't routinely screen for EAC in patients with chronic GERD
A new guideline from the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care, based on a rigorous systematic review of the latest evidence, found no benefit of routine screening for esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) and precursor conditions (Barrett esophagus and dysplasia) in patients with chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The guideline, published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal), recommends physicians in Canada continue current practice to not screen routinely http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.190814. (2020-07-06)

Elderly people's response to COVID-19 not as expected
Survey results from 27 countries suggest that, despite their increased risk of severe illness due to COVID-19, elderly people are not more willing to isolate when asked to, and are not more compliant with several COVID-19 preventive measures. Jean-François Daoust of the University of Edinburgh, UK, presents these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on July 2, 2020. (2020-07-02)

Excessive sugar intake linked with unhealthy fat deposits
Sugar consumption is linked with larger fat deposits around the heart and in the abdomen, which are risky for health. That's the finding of a study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). ''When we consume too much sugar the excess is converted to fat and stored,'' said study author Ms. So Yun Yi, a PhD student at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health. (2020-06-28)

New data reveals even low levels of air pollution triggers gene expression
New data from a landmark study by Monash University researchers raises concerns that even short-term exposure to low level air pollution can affect gene expression, leaving us at risk of diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. (2020-06-24)

Study links financial hardship to more ED visits; less preventive care
A new study finds higher medical and nonmedical financial hardships are independently associated with more emergency department visits, lower receipt of some preventive services, and worse self-rated health in cancer survivors. (2020-06-18)

Health care workers at Rush invited to participate in national PCORnet study of hydroxychloroquine
Rush University Medical Center has opened enrollment for a new clinical trial investigating whether the drug hydroxychloroquine is better than a placebo in preventing COVID-19 infection in healthy people working in health care settings. (2020-06-11)

USPSTF recommendation on screening for unhealthy drug use
The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening for unhealthy drug use in adults 18 or older by asking questions about such use when services for diagnosis, treatment, and care can be offered or referred. Unhealthy drug use includes using illegal drugs or using a prescription drug in ways that are not recommended by a doctor. (2020-06-09)

BU researcher: Screening for drug use can be reasonable, but not evidence-based
In the June 9 issue of JAMA, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that clinicians screen for unhealthy drug use (that is, any use of drugs that are illegal or medications not used for medical purposes) for all adult patients, but admits that there is still little evidence weighing the benefits and risks of this practice. (2020-06-09)

Genetic risk scores may improve clinical identification of patients with heart attack risk
Researchers at Mass General and the Broad Institute have found that applying polygenic risk scores can identify patients at risk of a heart attack who may be missed in standard clinical evaluations. (2020-06-02)

Pulmonary embolism and COVID-19
Researchers at Henry Ford Health System in Detroit say early diagnosis of a life-threatening blood clot in the lungs led to swifter treatment intervention in COVID-19 patients. In a new study published recently in the journal Radiology, researchers found that 51 percent of patients found to have a pulmonary embolism, or PE, were diagnosed in the Emergency Department, the entry point for patients being admitted to the hospital. (2020-06-02)

New pill could prevent anaphylaxis in people with food, drug allergies
For someone with a food or drug allergy, the risk of life-threatening anaphylactic shock lurks around every corner. A new Northwestern Medicine study shows there might be a pill that can be taken proactively to prevent mild to life-threatening anaphylaxis, no matter the cause. (2020-06-02)

Older men worry less than others about COVID-19
Older men may be at greater risk of contracting COVID-19 because they worry less about catching or dying from it, according to a new study by researchers at Georgia State University. This is a concern because older men are already more at risk of severe or fatal COVID-19 infections, and the study participants who were most worried about COVID-19 were also the most likely to have implemented protective behavior changes. (2020-05-29)

Evidence insufficient regarding interventions to prevent illicit drug use in children, teens and young adults
The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has concluded that current evidence is insufficient to make a recommendation regarding primary care-based behavioral counseling interventions to prevent illicit drug use (including nonmedical use of prescription drugs) in children, adolescents and young adults. (2020-05-26)

Ozone disinfectants can be used to sterilize cloth and n95 masks against COVID-19
Ozone gas has been shown to kill the SARS coronavirus in at least seventeen separate studies [1, 2]. Since the structure of the SARS coronavirus is almost identical to COVID-19; it is logical to assume that it will also kill COVID-19. (2020-05-26)

Half of moms-to-be at risk of preeclampsia are missing out on preventive aspirin
More than half of moms-to-be who are at risk of the dangerously high blood pressure condition, preeclampsia, are missing out on preventive aspirin treatment, says an expert in an editorial published online in Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin. (2020-05-21)

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