Current Primary Care Physicians News and Events

Current Primary Care Physicians News and Events, Primary Care Physicians News Articles.
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A biological strategy reveals how efficient brain circuitry develops spontaneously
Researchers have explained how the regularly structured topographic maps in the visual cortex of the brain could arise spontaneously to efficiently process visual information. This research provides a new framework for understanding functional architectures in the visual cortex during early developmental stages. (2021-01-19)

Geisinger researchers find sex is not an independent risk factor for stroke mortality
An analysis of data collected from patients treated for ischemic stroke at Geisinger shows no disparity in outcomes based solely on sex. (2021-01-19)

Geisinger research identifies genetic risk factor for stroke
A team of Geisinger researchers has identified a common genetic variant as a risk factor for stroke, especially in patients older than 65. (2021-01-19)

Individual and organizational capacity to change can reduce health care workforce burnout
New George Mason University Study finds that health care professionals with a greater personal ability to respond to change experienced lower rates of burnout when their work environments offered strong communication, teamwork, and leadership support. This is one of the first studies to explore the effect of individual and organizational capacity for change on burnout among health care professionals. (2021-01-19)

Mount Sinai researchers build models using machine learning technique to enhance predictions of COVID-19 outcomes
Mount Sinai researchers have published one of the first studies using federated learning to examine electronic health records to better predict how COVID-19 patients will progress. (2021-01-18)

Primary care physicians account for a minority of spending on low-value care
Primary care physicians (PCPs) are seen as gatekeepers to reduce spending on low-value health care services, which have been estimated to cost the health care system up to $100 billion annually. A brief research report published in Annals of Internal Medicine analyzed how much low-value spending is directly related to PCPs' services and referral decisions. (2021-01-18)

45% of adults over 65 lack online medical accounts, which could affect COVID vaccination
As the vaccination of older adults against COVID-19 begins across the country, new poll data suggests that many of them don't yet have access to the 'patient portal' online systems that could make it much easier for them to schedule a vaccination appointment. The poll finds that 45% of adults aged 65 to 80, and 42% of adults aged 50 to 80, said they hadn't set up an account with their health provider's portal system. (2021-01-15)

Emotionally neglected or severely sexually abused girls report riskier sexual behavior
Girls who are emotionally neglected or severely sexually abused early in their lives report riskier sexual behaviors during adolescence, Mount Sinai researchers report. The findings highlight the need--and suggest the potential for tailored approaches--to promote healthy sexual development in vulnerable populations. (2021-01-14)

Inpatient mammograms can reduce disparities in breast cancer screening rates
Inpatient mammograms are a feasible approach to deliver preventive care to hospitalized women who may face significant barriers to completing the test in the outpatient setting. (2021-01-13)

Expanding the biosynthetic pathway via retrobiosynthesis
KAIST metabolic engineers presented the bio-based production of multiple short-chain primary amines that have a wide range of applications in chemical industries for the first time. The research team designed the novel biosynthetic pathways for short-chain primary amines by combining retrobiosynthesis and a precursor selection step. (2021-01-13)

High levels of clinician burnout identified at leading cardiac centre
More than half the clinicians surveyed at the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre reported burnout and high levels of distress according to a series of studies published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal Open (CMAJ-OPEN). In the studies carried out before the COVID-19 pandemic, 78% of nurses, 73% of allied health staff and 65% of physicians described experiencing burnout. (2021-01-12)

Black and Hispanic Californians face health discrimination; less trusting of clinicians
A recent statewide survey of Californians uncovered that 30% of Black adults and 13% of Hispanic adults felt that they have been judged or treated differently by a health care provider because of their race/ethnicity or language. (2021-01-12)

North Carolina simplifies medicaid enrollment, improves coverage for pregnant women
North Carolina did not expand Medicaid eligibility under the ACA, which continued to put many low-income women at risk for losing health care coverage post partum. The state did comply with ACA standards for simplifying Medicaid enrollment. By automating the process and removing a stringent and often cumbersome financial assessment process, more low-income women qualified for full Medicaid and reduced the number of women who instead qualified for more limited benefits under the state's Medicaid for Pregnant Women program. (2021-01-12)

Primary care plays key role in managing COVID-19 in three Asian cities
Despite having some of the densest living spaces and the highest number of international visitors, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Beijing have utilized their respective primary health care systems to keep their COVID-19 cases and deaths relatively low. (2021-01-12)

Fewer patient encounters drive decline in total primary care office visits
Despite seeing gains in insurance coverage for preventive health services under the Affordable Care Act, the US has seen a declining rate of primary care visits over the past fifteen years. Are fewer individuals seeing primary care physicians? (2021-01-12)

New study examines medical practice patterns over time
Variations in medical practice can have serious consequences for the quality, equity and cost of one's health care; however, it's unclear whether these disparities can be attributed to individual differences, from one doctor to another or to changes in your doctor's individual practice over time, perhaps in response to shifts in clinical guidelines or advancements in diagnostic technologists. (2021-01-12)

Canada must dismantle anti-Black racism in medicine
Canada must dismantle anti-Black racism in health care to address its harmful effects on people's health, argue authors of a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.201579 (2021-01-11)

Physician-pharmacist collaboration may increase adherence to opioid addiction treatment
A collaborative approach to treating opioid use disorder that relies heavily on community pharmacists is feasible and may increase adherence and participant satisfaction, according to a pilot study published today in Addiction. The study was supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of Health, through the NIDA Center for the Clinical Trials Network. (2021-01-11)

Nurse involvement promotes discussion of advanced care planning during office visits
Most doctors would agree that advanced care planning (ACP) for patients, especially older adults, is important in providing the best and most appropriate health care over the course of a patient's life. (2021-01-11)

COVID-19 accelerates cancer virtual care with quality, convenience and cost savings
Patients and healthcare providers at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre rated virtual care during COVID-19 as highly satisfactory overall for quality of care and convenience, while at the same time saving patients millions in costs. (2021-01-07)

Low risk of severe COVID-19 in children
Sweden kept preschools, primary and lower secondary schools open during the spring of 2020. So far, little research has been done on the risk of children being seriously affected by COVID-19 when the schools were open. A study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden has now shown that one child in 130,000 was treated in an intensive care unit on account of COVID-19 during March-June. The study has been published in New England Journal of Medicine. (2021-01-06)

AI algorithms detect diabetic eye disease inconsistently
In a paper published Jan. 5 in Diabetes Care, researchers compared seven algorithms to detect diabetic retinopathy against the diagnostic expertise of retina specialists. (2021-01-05)

One in four doctors attacked, harassed on social media
The first known study to describe physician experiences with online harassment found one in four physicians report being personally attacked on social media, including being barraged by negative reviews, receiving coordinated harassment and threats at work, and having their personal information shared publicly. Some attacks were particularly disturbing, such as threats of rape and death. Although the data were collected before the COVID-19 outbreak, the findings highlight the intensity of online harassment before the pandemic, which has only intensified since the spring. (2021-01-04)

OSU studies find Oregon's Medicaid expansion improved prenatal care access, birth outcomes
A pair of recent studies from Oregon State University found that Oregon's Medicaid expansion in 2014 has led to increased prenatal care among low-income women, as well as improved health outcomes for newborn babies. (2020-12-31)

Patient characteristics associated with telemedicine access during COVID-19 pandemic
This study identified racial/ ethnic, sex, age, language, and socioeconomic differences in accessing telemedicine for primary care and specialty ambulatory care; if not addressed, these differences may compound existing inequities in care among vulnerable populations. (2020-12-29)

Despite recommendations, patients with treatment-resistant hypertension rarely tested for primary al
A retrospective cohort study found that testing for primary aldosteronism in patients with treatment-resistent hypertension was rare and also associated with higher rates of evidence-based treatment and better longitudinal blood pressure control. The findings are published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (2020-12-28)

Chest pain risk assessment may reduce treatment disparities
The use of a standardized tool for assessing the risk of serious outcomes in patients with chest pain was associated with women at high risk receiving comparable care to men, according to new research published in the Annals of Emergency Medicine. Care received by women at low and intermediate risk was consistent with current clinical recommendations. Men received more stress testing and were more likely to be hospitalized than women. (2020-12-23)

Study finds cancer survivors run greater risk of developing, dying from second cancers
A new American Cancer Society study finds that adult-onset cancer survivors run a greater risk of developing and dying from subsequent primary cancers (SPCs) than the general population. (2020-12-22)

Despite same treatment, obese women face more risks for postpartum hemorrhage complications
As part of an academic medical center initiative to improve maternal health, researchers at the University of South Florida Health (USF Health) and Tampa General Hospital (TGH) examined how obesity affected the management and outcomes of postpartum hemorrhage at a tertiary care center. The findings highlight that certain groups of high-risk obstetric patients, such as obese women, may need a different treatment protocol for postpartum hemorrhage, a potentially serious and largely preventable obstetric complication. (2020-12-21)

ACP, Annals of Internal Medicine host virtual COVID-19 Vaccine Forum II for physicians
As COVID-19 vaccines are becoming available, physicians and other health care professionals must do the hard work of making sure sufficient numbers of people are vaccinated to end the pandemic. (2020-12-21)

How has the COVID-19 pandemic affected measles vaccination rates?
In a recent study published in Pediatrics, researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital evaluated changes in measles vaccination rates from before the pandemic to this summer, when return for clinical care was encouraged. Finding a steep and lasting decline, the researchers are making efforts to improve timely vaccination and provide safe catch-up opportunities to children in their pediatric primary care network. (2020-12-17)

Nurse practitioners bring big savings to long-term care facilities in Quebec
Countries worldwide face challenges meeting the growing needs for long-term care services because of high costs. A study led by researchers from McGill University and Université du Québec en Outaouais shows that introducing nurse practitioners can significantly reduce costs and improve patient safety. (2020-12-17)

Discriminatory policies threaten care for transgender, gender diverse individuals
The Endocrine Society and the Pediatric Endocrine Society oppose legislative efforts to block transgender and gender diverse individuals from accessing gender-affirming medical and surgical care, the two medical societies said in a joint policy perspective published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2020-12-16)

Just what the doctor ordered: Mental health and wellness apps
Kaiser Permanente physicians and therapists now have the ability to refer their patients to evidenced-based mental health and wellness apps through the organization's electronic health record system. With a simple referral to an app, Kaiser Permanente patients can begin using it on their own or under the guidance of a clinician -- at no cost. (2020-12-16)

Patients don't receive recommended follow-up care after weight loss surgery
New research shows that patients don't receive the recommended follow-up care from their GPs after weight loss surgery - potentially leading to serious health consequences. (2020-12-16)

Traffic light system helps reduce clinical uncertainty, improve treatment decisions
A new study has found one in four clinical decisions made by physicians falls short of best practices, but when physicians reviewed a simple traffic light system prior to making a clinical decision, uncertainty was reduced by 70 per cent and treatment decisions improved. (2020-12-16)

Researchers identify predictors of timely enrollment in treatment for opioid use disorder
Frequent doctor visits were associated with timely treatment, while prior overdose, alcohol use disorder and back problems predicted non-enrollment, study finds. (2020-12-16)

Costs, COVID-19 risk and delays top older adults' concerns about seeking emergency care
Even before the pandemic, older Americans had concerns about seeking emergency care because of the costs they might face, the amount of time they might spend in the waiting room and the worry that they might end up hospitalized. But the risk of catching the novel coronavirus in the emergency department and developing COVID-19 added to those worries, according to a national poll of people ages 50 to 80 taken in June. (2020-12-15)

Analysis finds gaps in care in treating opioid use disorders during pandemic shutdowns
Study finds no decrease in prescription fills or clinician visits in the first three months of the COVID-19 pandemic for patients recently receiving opioid use disorder therapy. On the flip side, the study found that during this period fewer people started new treatment for opioid use disorder and fewer urine tests were given across both new and established patients. Findings identify strengths and weaknesses in telemedicine's role for opioid use disorder during shutdowns and can inform strategies for improvement. (2020-12-15)

How long do doctor visits last? Electronic health records provide new data on time with patients
How much time do primary care physicians actually spend one-on-one with patients? Analysis of timestamp data from electronic health records (EHRs) provides useful insights on exam length and other factors related to doctors' use of time, reports a study in the January issue of Medical Care. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2020-12-15)

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