Current Primary School News and Events

Current Primary School News and Events, Primary School News Articles.
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Researchers find diverse supportive partnerships among older gay men with and without HIV
Recent data reveals that gay men living with HIV report having supportive relationships with family, friends, or in informal relationships rather than with primary romantic partners, while gay men who are HIV negative report having relationships mainly with primary partners. Additionally, gay men living with HIV were more likely to report no primary or secondary supportive partnerships compared to men who are HIV negative. (2021-02-17)

The effects of picking up primary school pupils on surrounding street's traffic
The objective of this study is to find out factors affecting the picking up of pupils at primary school by evaluating the typical primary schools in Hanoi city. (2021-02-16)

79% decrease in primary care visits, 56-fold increase in virtual care: COVID-19 pandemic
In the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, there was an almost 80% decrease in primary care office visits in Ontario and a 56-fold increase in virtual visits, found new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2021-02-08)

Pain patients who take opioids can't get in the door at over half of primary care clinics
People who take opioid medications for chronic pain may have a hard time finding a new primary care clinic that will take them as a patient if they need one, according to a new 'secret shopper' study of hundreds of clinics across the country. Stigma against long-term users of prescription opioids, likely related to the prospect of taking on a patient who might have an opioid use disorder or addiction, appears to play a role. (2021-01-27)

A biological strategy reveals how efficient brain circuitry develops spontaneously
Researchers have explained how the regularly structured topographic maps in the visual cortex of the brain could arise spontaneously to efficiently process visual information. This research provides a new framework for understanding functional architectures in the visual cortex during early developmental stages. (2021-01-19)

Expanding the biosynthetic pathway via retrobiosynthesis
KAIST metabolic engineers presented the bio-based production of multiple short-chain primary amines that have a wide range of applications in chemical industries for the first time. The research team designed the novel biosynthetic pathways for short-chain primary amines by combining retrobiosynthesis and a precursor selection step. (2021-01-13)

Texas A&M research explores how melanoma grows and spreads
The first step in treating cancer is understanding how it starts, grows and spreads throughout the body. A relatively new cancer research approach is the study of metabolites, the products of different steps in cancer cell metabolism, and how those substances interact. (2021-01-12)

Primary care plays key role in managing COVID-19 in three Asian cities
Despite having some of the densest living spaces and the highest number of international visitors, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Beijing have utilized their respective primary health care systems to keep their COVID-19 cases and deaths relatively low. (2021-01-12)

Fewer patient encounters drive decline in total primary care office visits
Despite seeing gains in insurance coverage for preventive health services under the Affordable Care Act, the US has seen a declining rate of primary care visits over the past fifteen years. Are fewer individuals seeing primary care physicians? (2021-01-12)

New study examines medical practice patterns over time
Variations in medical practice can have serious consequences for the quality, equity and cost of one's health care; however, it's unclear whether these disparities can be attributed to individual differences, from one doctor to another or to changes in your doctor's individual practice over time, perhaps in response to shifts in clinical guidelines or advancements in diagnostic technologists. (2021-01-12)

How has the COVID-19 pandemic affected measles vaccination rates?
In a recent study published in Pediatrics, researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital evaluated changes in measles vaccination rates from before the pandemic to this summer, when return for clinical care was encouraged. Finding a steep and lasting decline, the researchers are making efforts to improve timely vaccination and provide safe catch-up opportunities to children in their pediatric primary care network. (2020-12-17)

The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Confirmed COVID-19 cases and outbreaks were low in schools and nurseries in England that re-opened after the first lockdown
COVID-19 cases and outbreaks were low among staff and students in schools and nurseries in England that re-opened during the summer half-term after lockdown, according to research published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal. (2020-12-08)

Pupils can learn more effectively through stories than activities
Storytelling -- the oldest form of teaching -- is the most effective way of teaching primary school children about evolution, say researchers at the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath. (2020-12-07)

Some primary school-aged children self-harm, prompting calls for earlier intervention
New research reveals that some primary school-aged children have self-harmed, prompting calls for intervention efforts to start earlier. (2020-12-01)

Rethink COVID-19 infection control to keep primary schools open this winter, governments urged
An urgent rethink of infection control policies to keep COVID-19 infection at bay in schools is needed if primary schools are to be kept open this winter, and the knock-on effects on their families avoided, argue children's infectious disease specialists in a viewpoint, published online in the Archives of Disease in Childhood. (2020-11-29)

How religion can hamper economic progress
Study from Bocconi University on impact of antiscientific curricula of Catholic schools on accumulation of human capital in France during the 2nd Industrial Revolution could hold lessons on impact of religion on technological progress today. (2020-11-13)

Treating opioid addiction in primary care helps patients and cash-strapped medical practices
Buprenorphine-based treatment for opioid addiction is in short supply in many areas of the United States. And while many physicians want to offer it, clinics are unsure how to offer buprenorphine therapy in a financially sustainable way. (2020-11-10)

The EAR-PC study findings encourages screening for hearing loss in older adults
Hearing loss is the second most common disability in the United States and comes with it a higher risk for being diagnosed with significant health conditions, such as hypertension, diabetes, dementia and depression, as well as higher health care cost and use. The Early Auditory Referral-Primary Care (EAR-PC) study was designed to address the lack of data about hearing loss screening. (2020-11-10)

Six ways primary care "medical homes" are lowering health care spending
New analysis of 394 U.S. primary care practices identifies the aspects of care delivery that are associated with lower health care spending and lower utilization of emergency care and hospital admissions. (2020-11-10)

Potentially preventable hospitalizations among older adults: 2010-2014
When complications due to diabetes, asthma, urinary tract infections, high blood pressure and other common conditions lead patients to visit the ER, researchers and health care quality administrators may label these visits as ''potentially preventable hospitalizations.'' That is, with good outpatient care, these visits could have been potentially avoided. Potentially preventable hospitalizations are costly and can negatively impact the health and well-being of individuals, particularly if they are older. (2020-11-10)

Innovative strategies sustain children's preventative care during pandemic
Nemours Children's Health System increased patient immunizations by 4.6% from January - September 2020, compared with the same period in 2019, through an innovative hybrid approach to care using both in-person and telemedicine, according to new data presented today at the Children's Hospital Association's 2020 Annual Leadership Conference. (2020-11-02)

Where you get depression care matters, study finds
Research shows that collaborative care programs in which primary-care providers work with a depression care manager and a designated psychiatric consultant can more than double the likelihood of improving depression outcomes. But a new study published in Health Affairs shows that not all care is equal. (2020-11-02)

Study highlights shortcomings in telemedicine despite large increases in remote consults during COVID-19 pandemic
Despite increased use of telemedicine during the COVID-19 pandemic, Americans have had significantly fewer consultations with primary care doctors and markedly fewer assessments of common cardiac risk factors. (2020-10-02)

Dinosaur feather study debunked
A new study published in ''Scientific Reports'' provides substantial evidence that the first fossil feather ever to be discovered does belong to the iconic bird-like dinosaur, Archaeopteryx. This debunks a recent theory that the fossil feather originated from a different species. (2020-09-30)

Study: Europe's old-growth forests at risk
A new study presents the first comprehensive assessment of the conservation status of primary forests in Europe--and shows that many of them are not protected and at risk of being destroyed. The researchers conclude that formal conservation of these forests should be a top priority for countries to meet their climate change and biodiversity goals. (2020-09-17)

Telehealth supports collaborative mental health care in the needs of rural patients
Traditionally, primary care clinics connect patients who have mental health care needs to specialists like psychiatrists in a collaborative care model. However, rural clinics often lack the workforce capacity to provide collaborative behavioral health services. In a new qualitative study, rural Washington primary care clinics adopted telehealth methods to connect remotely with specialists. The study found that telepsychiatric collaboration prepared primary care physicians and rural clinic staff to deliver high quality mental health care in underserved areas. (2020-09-15)

Peritonsillar abscess risk following respiratory infection is low with/without antibiotics
While widespread unnecessary use of antibiotics can diminish their effectiveness, reducing antibiotic prescribing may increase the risk of serious bacterial infections. This study quantifies the benefits of prescribing antibiotics for respiratory tract infections in terms of reduction in risk of peritonsillar abscess. (2020-09-15)

Expenditures for primary care may affect how primary care is delivered
This study looks at trends in out-of-pocket and total visit expenditures for visits to primary care physicians. Using the 2002-2017 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), the authors described changes in out-of-pocket and total visit expenditures for primary care visits for Medicare, Medicaid and private insurance. If current trends continue, the authors would expect increasing difficulty with primary care physician access, particularly for Medicaid patients. (2020-09-15)

Patient access to after-hours primary care could prevent some less urgent ER visits
Patients who receive in-home nursing care have lower emergency room utilization if they have access to after-hours primary care. Previous research found that home nursing patients in Ontario, Canada, have an increased risk of visiting the ER after normal clinic hours on the same day they receive a home nursing visit. These ER visits may be linked to the visiting nurse identifying a health issue they are unable to appropriately address during the visit. (2020-09-15)

Primary care clinicians drove increasing use of Medicare's chronic care management codes
To address the problem of care fragmentation for Medicare recipients with multiple chronic conditions, Medicare introduced Chronic Care Management (CCM) in 2015 to reimburse clinicians for care management and coordination. The study showed that CCM use increased over this four-year period, driven largely by primary care physicians. (2020-09-15)

Factors associated with high performance improvement in VA primary care settings
VA researchers whose aim was to identify organizational and contextual factors associated with greater use of patient engagement processes found that high performing clinics were more likely to have fully-staffed primary care teams, clearly defined roles for team members, leadership responsible for implementing team-based care, and team meetings to discuss performance improvement, compared to clinics that performed poorly with regard to use of patient engagement processes. (2020-09-15)

An effective way to increase capacity for mental health
Researchers at UW Medicine found that primary-care physicians and rural clinic staff felt more skilled in delivering mental health care if they used a model known as collaborative care. In the model, primary-care physicians retain primary responsibility to treat behavioral health disorders with the support of two team members: a care manager (e.g., social workers, therapists, nurses) and a consulting psychiatrist. (2020-09-15)

Europe's primary forests: What to protect? What to restore?
Expanding the protected areas by 1% could save most remaining primary forests in Europe. This is the main result of researchers from the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Humboldt-University Berlin and others. This first assessment of the conservation status of Europe's primary forests identifies protection gaps and areas with restoration needs to enable the implementation of the new EU Biodiversity Strategy. (2020-09-15)

Drugs bill warning over US/UK trade deal
The NHS would spend billions of pounds more on drugs if it had to pay US prices following a US/UK trade deal. According to a new study by researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Harvard Medical School, and the University of Oxford, NHS England would have spent over £5 billion more on 50 brand-name prescription drugs widely used in primary care if it had paid US prices in 2018. (2020-09-10)

Radiation for young adult cancer linked to worse BC survival in premenopausal women
Bottom Line: Among premenopausal women with breast cancer, those who were previously treated with radiation for a primary childhood, adolescent, or young adult cancer had worse breast cancer-specific survival. (2020-08-26)

COVID-19 study confirms low transmission in educational settings
New research from University of Sydney finds COVID-19 transmission rates in NSW schools and early childcare education and care settings were minimal, particularly between children and from children to adults. (2020-08-03)

Cell antennas lacking in Fragile X syndrome, study finds
Researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio found fewer structures called primary cilia in the brains of mice born with Fragile X syndrome. This provides a clue into possibly treating neurodevelopmental disorders. The research is in Stem Cell Reports. (2020-07-30)

Risk of sepsis greatest for patients with frailty, older age or urinary tract infections
Patients with frailty, older age and urinary tract infections (UTIs) are at greatest risk of developing sepsis following infection consultations in primary care, research has found. (2020-07-24)

Rural firearm-suicides impacted by socioeconomic, environmental factors
In an attempt to address the escalating rate of self-inflicted firearm injury deaths in rural America, researchers are proposing interventions to reduce these suicides be community-based and include programs to reduce other diseases of despair, such as heart and liver diseases, diabetes and accidental opioid overdose. The recent decline in life expectancy of Americans has been attributed to these diseases of despair and appear to primarily afflict white rural America (2020-07-21)

Decision support system within the EHR system can increase provider awareness of CKD
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects approximately 37 million U.S. adults and less than 25% are aware of their disease. CKD is readily identified with simple blood and urine tests that are often in a patient's health record yet providers usually do not diagnose the CKD and inform the patient. This study demonstrates that implementation of a decision support system within the electronic health records system can increase provider awareness of CKD. (2020-07-16)

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