Current Prison News and Events

Current Prison News and Events, Prison News Articles.
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Northwestern researcher to discuss consequences of incarceration at AAAS annual meeting
Teplin will moderate the scientific session ''Consequences of Incarceration on Health Inequity and Racial Injustice'' at 2 p.m. EST, Monday, Feb. 8. During the session, she will also present ''Consequences of Incarceration in Detained Youth: A 15-Year Longitudinal Study.'' (2021-02-08)

Study aims to break the chains of incarceration in African American males
The majority of African American men return to prison within one to three years of their first release. A study explores why re-entry programs aren't as effective for them when compared to others. Researchers suggest a holistic approach that addresses psychological and historical trauma in conjunction with the environmental factors that perpetuate the stigma justice-involved African American men experience. The approach accounts for negative associations developed in the centuries of oppression and segregation that shape their current societal interactions. (2021-02-02)

Free all non-violent criminals jailed on minor drug offences, say experts
Non-violent offenders serving time for drug use or possession should be freed immediately and their convictions erased, according to research published in the peer-reviewed The American Journal of Bioethics. (2021-01-07)

Mass incarceration results in significant increases in industrial emissions, study finds
Mass incarceration is as much an environmental problem as it is a social one, according to a new Portland State University study that finds increases in incarceration are significantly associated with increases in industrial emissions. (2020-12-04)

States unfairly burdening incarcerated people with 'pay-to-stay' fees
Pay-to-stay, the practice of charging people to pay for their own jail or prison confinement, is being enforced unfairly by using criminal, civil and administrative law, according to a new Rutgers University-New Brunswick led study. (2020-11-20)

Cannabis farms are a modern slavery 'blind spot' for UK police, study suggests
Migrants arrested for tending plants in the flats, houses and attics where cannabis is grown in bulk are often victims of trafficking and ''debt bondage'' - yet many are not recognised as such by police, according to a new study. (2020-09-15)

Privatized prisons lead to more inmates, longer sentences, study finds
WSU study finds that when states turn to private prisons, the number of criminals incarcerated rises and the length of sentences increases. Private prisons lead to an average increase of 178 new prisoners per million population per year. At an average cost of $60 per day per prisoner, that costs states between $1.9 to $10.6 million per year, if all those additional prisoners are in private prisons. (2020-09-14)

Familial incarceration negatively impacts mental health for African American women
More than half of all African American women in the United States report having at least one family member who is incarcerated, causing higher levels of depressive symptoms and psychological distress than previously understood. (2020-09-02)

Decorating windows for optimal sound transmission
Glass windows typically offer some amount of sound proofing, sometimes unintentionally. In general, ventilation is required to achieve large sound transmission. But some applications -- like gas explosion studies -- require a transparent partition that allows for acoustic propagation without the presence of airflow. In those cases, ventilation is not allowed. In Applied Physics Letters, researchers discuss a layered glass material they developed that allows for efficient sound transmission with no air ventilation. (2020-09-01)

Punitive sentencing led to higher incarceration rates throughout adulthood for certain birth cohorts in North Carolina
A new study using 45 years of incarceration data from North Carolina suggests an alternative explanation to the current rates of incarceration: this pattern is driven by the prolonged involvement in the criminal justice system by members of Generation X, who came of age during the 1980s and early 1990s. (2020-08-24)

Dignity and respect go a long way in county jail, new research shows
A University of Wisconsin Oshkosh study indicates a little respect and decency can go a long way in improving some aspects of America's criminal justice system. Matt Richie, an assistant criminal justice professor, recently published 'Managing the Rabble with Dignity and Respect,' in the Journal of Crime and Justice, a publication of the Midwestern Criminal Justice Association. His findings reveal a great deal of the work involves interpersonal communication skills rather than physical force. (2020-08-12)

Group-based smoking cessation help US inmates quit tobacco
Behavioral and nicotine replacement therapies offered together can help people who are incarcerated quit smoking, according to Rutgers researchers. (2020-07-30)

Expanded access to treatment in prisons can reduce overdose deaths by 31.6%, study finds
Using a microsimulation model, researchers at Brown predicted the number of opioid-related overdose deaths related to three different treatment options over the course of 8 years. (2020-07-22)

Concerns over police head injuries
Head injuries may be worryingly common among police officers, according to a new pilot study led by the University of Exeter. (2020-07-20)

COVID-19 cases and deaths in federal and state prisons significantly higher than in US population
A new analysis led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that the number of US prison residents who tested positive for COVID-19 was 5.5 times higher than the general US population. (2020-07-08)

Linking hospital and other records can predict both fatal and nonfatal opioid overdoses, study suggests
A new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that the odds of a fatal opioid overdose were 1.5 times higher for individuals with one to two visits to the emergency department for any medical issue than for people with no hospital visits. (2020-06-24)

Extra police powers during COVID-19 could affect relationship with public for good
Serving police officer and Huddersfield PhD researcher Dan Jones warns against police forces adopting an authoritarian or militarised approach, following new study (2020-06-15)

Up to 45 percent of SARS-CoV-2 infections may be asymptomatic
Asymptomatic infections may have played a significant role in the early and ongoing spread of COVID-19 and highlight the need for expansive testing and contact tracing to mitigate the pandemic. (2020-06-12)

Place doesn't trump race as predictor of incarceration
Steven Alvarado is the author of 'The Complexities of Race and Place: Childhood Neighborhood Disadvantage and Adult Incarceration for Whites, Blacks, and Latinos,' published June 1 in the journal Socius showing that for black Americans growing up in better neighborhoods doesn't diminish the likelihood of going to prison nearly as much as it does for whites or Latinos. (2020-06-11)

American Journal of Preventive Medicine focuses on critical public health aspects of COVID-19
New research and guidance in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier, focus on critical topics pertaining to community and individual health during the COVID-19 epidemic. (2020-05-13)

Grandfamilies: New study uncovers common themes and challenges in kinship care
The opioid crisis and other social issues have left millions of US grandparents raising their grandchildren. A George Mason University study led by Dr. Catherine Tompkins studied grandfamilies in the Washington, DC area and offers a framework to help social workers develop best practices for understanding and addressing the relationship, situational, and emotional complexities of kinship care. (2020-05-05)

Study: Visitor's garden is improving prison visitation experience for all
New research shows that a visitor's garden designed and built by Iowa State University students and incarcerated individuals at the Iowa Correctional Institution for Women is helping to strengthen connections between the women and their children. (2020-04-20)

Leaving care of the children's home -- for prison?
When 18-year-old youths transition out of children's homes, what crimes do they commit? How often? Does it get worse over time? These juveniles move into an uncertain world, highly vulnerable, and with little social capital. They are generally viewed as at risk for criminal activities, supported by limited research globally. An unusual, small 6-year longitudinal study in South Africa sheds light on the under-researched lives of juvenile care leavers. (2020-03-22)

New study offers clues to origin of laws
The study found that despite living in separate countries and legal codes separated by thousands of years, people have a universal intuition about whether a punishment fits a crime. (2020-02-24)

Glaucoma care in prison inmates
Data fromĀ 82 prison inmates treated in a glaucoma clinic at an academic hospital were used in this observational study to report on how treatment and follow-up, including medication adherence, were are managed. (2020-02-20)

Patients most at risk of overdose at the beginning and after end of methadone treatment
A new study, led by RCSI researchers, has found that patients receiving methadone treatment are most at risk of overdosing in the month following the end of methadone treatment and during the first four weeks of treatment. (2020-02-20)

Antibiotics discovered that kill bacteria in a new way: McMaster
A new group of antibiotics with a unique approach to attacking bacteria has been discovered, making it a promising clinical candidate in the fight against antimicrobial resistance. The newly-found corbomycin and the lesser-known complestatin have a never-before-seen way to kill bacteria, which is achieved by blocking the function of the bacterial cell wall. The discovery comes from a family of antibiotics called glycopeptides that are produced by soil bacteria. (2020-02-12)

Incarceration of a family member during childhood associated with diabetes in men
Men who experienced a family member's incarceration are 64% more likely to have diabetes in later adulthood, compared to those who were not exposed to this childhood adversity, report researchers from the University of Toronto and University of Alabama in a recent study in SAGE-Open Medicine. (2020-02-05)

Solitary confinement significantly increases post-prison death risk
Even just a few days of solitary confinement may significantly increase inmates' risk of death after serving their sentences. (2020-02-05)

Prosecutors' race, class bias may not drive criminal justice disparities
Years of observational studies suggest that prosecutors' race and class biases are among the primary drivers for disparities in criminal justice. Recent University of Arizona-led research indicates otherwise. (2020-01-17)

A conversation could be the answer to successful rehabilitation of prisoners
Researchers have found people on the brink of release from a prison sentence have lost any sense of being connected to the outside world and, as a result, become prejudiced towards wider society. A simple conversation could help. (2020-01-09)

Barriers to reintegration lead to poorer health for the formerly incarcerated,
Formerly incarcerated individuals with barriers to re-entry and service needs following their release are subsequently more likely to experience poor physical and mental health, according to an eye-opening new Rutgers University-Camden study. (2019-12-06)

Study shows digital media has damaging impact on reintegration of 'white collar' criminals
Offenders convicted of occupational crime and corruption are having their rehabilitation negatively affected by long term 'labels' attached to them on digital media, according to new research by the University of Portsmouth. (2019-11-15)

Researchers challenge myth of the relationship between mental illness and incarceration
Researchers examined the relationship between psychiatric diagnoses and future incarceration by merging data from psychiatric interviews that took place in the 1980s with 30 years of follow-up data. Among other things, they found that diagnoses of substance use and antisocial personality were predictors of future incarceration but that other psychiatric diagnoses (i.e., schizophrenia, affective disorders, anxiety disorders, as well as some other psychiatric disorders) were not independent predictors. (2019-11-07)

World first on-the-spot test for synthetic drug 'spice' developed at University of Bath
A simple saliva test to detect if someone has recently taken the street drug ''spice'' has been developed at the University of Bath - the first such test ever created. (2019-10-30)

Prisoner's dilemma game reveals cooperation leads to leadership
Game theory has historically studied cooperation and hierarchy, and has sought to explain why individuals cooperate, even though they might be better off not to do so. In this week's Chaos, researchers use a specialized graph to map a social network of cooperators and their neighbors; they discovered cooperators can attract more neighbors to follow their behaviors and are more likely to become leaders, indicating different learning patterns exist between cooperators and defectors. (2019-10-23)

40% of people did not visit a family doctor after being released from prison
A new study analyzing the experiences of people released from provincial prison in Ontario in 2010 has found that 60% of people who were in Ontario's prison system were seen by a family doctor in the two years after being released from prison compared to 85% of people in the general population. (2019-10-11)

Restrictive housing is associated with increased risk of death after release from prison
A new study led by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has found that being held in restrictive housing (i.e., solitary confinement) is associated with an increased risk of death after a person is released from prison. (2019-10-04)

Immigrants who committed felonies less likely than nonimmigrants to commit another felony
A new study compared recidivism rates of foreign-born and native-born individuals formerly incarcerated for felonies and released from prisons in Florida. It found that immigrants are significantly less likely to reoffend by committing another felony than their nonimmigrant peers. (2019-09-18)

Government housing voucher program effectively reduces homeless veteran population
Research led by Notre Dame's William Evans confirms that for every HUD-VASH voucher distributed, one fewer veteran is living on the streets. (2019-09-10)

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