Current Prisoners News and Events

Current Prisoners News and Events, Prisoners News Articles.
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Racism and anti-gay discrimination heighten risk for arrest and incarceration
New research by Morgan Philbin, PhD, at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and colleagues looks at why Black young men who have sex with men (YMSM) are disproportionately subject to high rates of arrest and incarceration. They find that perceived racial discrimination, sexual orientation discrimination, and HIV-status discrimination are all associated with risk for criminal justice involvement in this population. (2021-02-09)

Free all non-violent criminals jailed on minor drug offences, say experts
Non-violent offenders serving time for drug use or possession should be freed immediately and their convictions erased, according to research published in the peer-reviewed The American Journal of Bioethics. (2021-01-07)

Mass incarceration results in significant increases in industrial emissions, study finds
Mass incarceration is as much an environmental problem as it is a social one, according to a new Portland State University study that finds increases in incarceration are significantly associated with increases in industrial emissions. (2020-12-04)

Privatized prisons lead to more inmates, longer sentences, study finds
WSU study finds that when states turn to private prisons, the number of criminals incarcerated rises and the length of sentences increases. Private prisons lead to an average increase of 178 new prisoners per million population per year. At an average cost of $60 per day per prisoner, that costs states between $1.9 to $10.6 million per year, if all those additional prisoners are in private prisons. (2020-09-14)

Images of captive torment in art
Between the arrival of pearl divers and war brides - long after Japanese performers toured Australia 150 years ago - an untold chapter of World War Two history has emerged in a new study of wartime art made by almost 5000 prisoners of war in Australia and New Zealand. Focusing on internment camps set up across Australia and NZ, Canterbury University and Flinders University art historians Richard Bullen and Tets Kimura examine some exquisite Japanese artworks produced during the extended period of war incarceration. (2020-09-04)

Punitive sentencing led to higher incarceration rates throughout adulthood for certain birth cohorts in North Carolina
A new study using 45 years of incarceration data from North Carolina suggests an alternative explanation to the current rates of incarceration: this pattern is driven by the prolonged involvement in the criminal justice system by members of Generation X, who came of age during the 1980s and early 1990s. (2020-08-24)

COVID-19 cases and deaths in federal and state prisons significantly higher than in US population
A new analysis led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that the number of US prison residents who tested positive for COVID-19 was 5.5 times higher than the general US population. (2020-07-08)

Major gaps in HIV programs in Africa
HIV management in developing countries varies with socioeconomic and structural circumstances, with two Flinders University studies finding examples of key ways to close the gap for those worst affected in developing countries. The studies, just published in PLoS ONE journal, call for reforms to nutritional programs and for better treatment of HIV affected prisoners - providing guidance for several sub-Saharan regions as well as other low and middle-income countries. (2020-05-31)

Working as peer-support specialist helps people with criminal and psychiatric histories
As houses of detention increasingly turn to early-release initiatives in the pandemic, a study explores a hopeful reintegration path for the formerly incarcerated with mental illness. (2020-04-30)

Security guards struggle with PTSD and lack mental health support
New research shows that thousands of security guards in the UK are suffering Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), having been exposed to frequent episodes of verbal and physical abuse. (2020-04-08)

A conversation could be the answer to successful rehabilitation of prisoners
Researchers have found people on the brink of release from a prison sentence have lost any sense of being connected to the outside world and, as a result, become prejudiced towards wider society. A simple conversation could help. (2020-01-09)

Isotope analysis points to prisoners of war
Maya archaeologists from the University of Bonn found the bones of about 20 people at a water reservoir in the former Maya city of Uxul (Mexico). They had apparently been killed and dismembered about 1,400 years ago. Did these victims come from Uxul or other regions of the Maya Area? Dr. Nicolaus Seefeld, who heads the project that is funded by the Gerda Henkel Foundation at the University of Bonn, is now one step further. (2019-12-11)

New study casts doubt on China's organ donation data
The Chinese government may have been systematically misreporting the number of organs it claims it has voluntarily collected since 2010, according to new research published in BMC Medical Ethics. (2019-11-14)

Researchers challenge myth of the relationship between mental illness and incarceration
Researchers examined the relationship between psychiatric diagnoses and future incarceration by merging data from psychiatric interviews that took place in the 1980s with 30 years of follow-up data. Among other things, they found that diagnoses of substance use and antisocial personality were predictors of future incarceration but that other psychiatric diagnoses (i.e., schizophrenia, affective disorders, anxiety disorders, as well as some other psychiatric disorders) were not independent predictors. (2019-11-07)

World first on-the-spot test for synthetic drug 'spice' developed at University of Bath
A simple saliva test to detect if someone has recently taken the street drug ''spice'' has been developed at the University of Bath - the first such test ever created. (2019-10-30)

Prisoner's dilemma game reveals cooperation leads to leadership
Game theory has historically studied cooperation and hierarchy, and has sought to explain why individuals cooperate, even though they might be better off not to do so. In this week's Chaos, researchers use a specialized graph to map a social network of cooperators and their neighbors; they discovered cooperators can attract more neighbors to follow their behaviors and are more likely to become leaders, indicating different learning patterns exist between cooperators and defectors. (2019-10-23)

Combating prison recidivism with plants
The United States currently incarcerates the greatest percentage of its population compared with any other nation in the world. The results and information gathered in this study support the notion that horticultural activities can play an important role in influencing an offender's successful reentry into society. (2019-09-06)

Poor health increases chance of recidivism, reincarceration, says Rutgers-Cam
Poor physical or mental health increases the chance that formerly incarcerated individuals will commit more crimes and return to prison, according to a groundbreaking new Rutgers University-Camden study. The study - conducted by Nathan Link and Richard Stansfield, assistant professors of criminal justice at Rutgers-Camden, and Jeffrey Ward, an associate professor of criminal justice at Temple University - advances a health-based model of desistance showing how both mental and physical health affect the chances of maintaining employment and positive family relationships, and ultimately recidivism. (2019-08-05)

How people want to feel determines whether others can influence their emotions
New Stanford research on emotions shows that people's motivations are a driving factor behind how much they allow others to influence their feelings, such as anger. (2019-06-25)

Private prisons have a political role in corrections issues in the US, researcher finds
Private prisons play a political role in immigration and incarceration issues in the United States and the industry may face obstacles as well as opportunities in the current political landscape, a new paper from an Oregon State University researcher suggests. (2019-06-25)

Early release rules for prisoners at end of life may be 'discriminatory,' say doctors
Doctors are calling for reform to rules governing when terminally ill prisoners are suitable for early release on compassionate grounds (ERCG) amid concerns that the current approach is discriminatory. (2019-06-12)

Widespread testing, treatment of Hepatitis C in US prisons improves outcomes
At current drug prices, testing all persons entering prison for Hepatitis C, treating those who have at least 12 months remaining in their sentence, and linking individuals with less than 12 months in their sentence to care upon their release would result in improved health outcomes. Published in Clinical Infectious Diseases, researchers found that these approaches provide the best value-for-money compared to not testing or treating any prisoners, or only testing and treating prisoners at high risk of Hepatitis C (HCV). (2019-05-21)

New study analyzes tweets to reveal how ISIS still inspires low-level attacks
By analyzing 26.2 million Twitter comments in the Arabic language, researchers found that despite losing territory, ISIS remains successful at inspiring low-level attacks because of its messaging for a 'call for lone jihad.' The study, 'ISIS at its apogee: The Arabic discourse about support for ISIS on Twitter and what we can learn from that,' was recently published in SAGE Open. (2019-05-15)

Prison tobacco ban significantly reduces secondhand smoke
Levels of secondhand smoke in Scotland's prisons fell by more than 80% in the week after smoking was banned, according to new University of Stirling research. (2019-05-06)

Novel healthcare program for former prisoners reduces recidivism
A healthcare program tailored to the needs of recently released prisoners can significantly reduce recidivism, according to a new study led by a Yale researcher. The findings show how an approach that provides community-based primary care can play a role in the nationwide effort to decrease prison populations. (2019-05-02)

The friendly extortioner takes it all
People who cunningly use cooperation and egoism are unbeatable. (2019-02-15)

Comprehensive AIDS prevention programs in prisons: A review study
In the current issue of Family Medicine and Community Health (Volume 6, Number 4, 2018; DOI: https://doi.org/10.15212/FMCH.2018.0118: , Somayeh Zare et al. discuss how studies show that suitable design of educational programs can affect prisoners' awareness of AIDS. (2019-01-04)

Prisoners who are sanctioned more are more likely to re-offend
A new longitudinal study that sought to determine the effect of these sanctions on recidivism found that prisoners who had greater exposure to formal sanctions were more likely to re-offend 1, 2, and 3 years after release; formal sanctions involve punishment for misconduct after a rules infraction board finds an inmate guilty. (2018-12-19)

Insomniac prisoners sleeping better after one-hour therapy session
Three-quarters of prisoners struggling to sleep have reported major improvements after receiving cognitive behavioural therapy to treat their insomnia. In the first study of its kind in the world, experts from Northumbria University have found that a single one-hour session of cognitive behavioural therapy was effective in preventing the development of chronic insomnia in 73% of prisoners. Inmates also reported that the therapy made notable improvements to their anxiety and depression. (2018-11-15)

Previously jailed vets at increased risk of suicide
Researchers are now looking at the healthcare services used by people who attempted suicide to find patterns that could help identify who is most at risk before an attempt is made. (2018-10-31)

Reading between the lines: Are we as savvy as we'd like to think when it comes to reviews?
New research suggests we are willing to blindly trust hotel reviews when they conform to our preconceived ideas. (2018-10-23)

People can die from giving up the fight
People can die simply because they've given up, life has beaten them and they feel defeat is inescapable, according to new research. (2018-09-27)

UCalgary scientists discover a way to diagnose types of fear of falling in Parkinson's patients
Parkinson's disease causes one of the highest risks of falling among all neurological conditions. Due to this, many patients develop a fear of falling, even if they've never fallen. Researchers with the Cumming School of Medicine have discovered a way to diagnose subtypes of fear of falling in hopes of improving treatment and quality of life for patients. (2018-09-25)

Monarchs ride west coast winds: Proof of butterfly migration gathered
After five years and nearly 15,000 tagged butterflies, scientists now have proof that Monarch butterflies migrate from the Pacific Northwest to California in late summer and fall, a journey averaging nearly 500 miles. (2018-06-25)

How to cure more hepatitis C patients
The cost of cures for hepatitis C have been prohibitive, but experts who served on an NAS panel have a solution that will save more patients and incentivize drug innovation. (2018-05-14)

Study finds opportunity to increase opioid dependence treatment in Ontario jails
The study included completion of an online survey by 27 physicians, who reported working in 15 of 26 provincial correctional facilities for adults in Ontario. This included 10 of the 13 facilities with a population of more than 200. The study identified that about half of the physicians prescribed methadone and half prescribed buprenorphine/naloxone to treat opioid dependence. (2018-02-15)

Research IDs key factors that help women ex-convicts avoid recidivism
New research identifies four factors that help women ex-convicts avoid committing crimes, offering insights that can be used to help former inmates integrate more successfully into their communities after time in prison. (2017-10-09)

Parole violations, not new crimes, help drive prison's revolving door
Failing a drug test, associating with felons and other technical parole violations are among the key drivers of prison's 'revolving door,' according to new UC Berkeley research. (2017-10-04)

Psychosocial factors, psychological disorders and violent crime
A low level of education is the variable that can most accurately predict this, according to a study carried out among inmates of Andalusian prisons. On the other hand, other classic factors, like alcoholism or personality disorders, do not appear in the equation that best predicts violent crimes. (2017-10-03)

Nature imagery calms prisoners
Sweeping shots of majestic landscapes. Glaciers, forests and waterfalls. Research published today shows that these images, shown to people deprived of access to nature, can reduce tension, help defuse anger and make some of the harshest environments, like a solitary confinement cellblock in a maximum-security prison, a little easier to bear. (2017-09-01)

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