Current Probiotics News and Events

Current Probiotics News and Events, Probiotics News Articles.
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NUS researchers concoct probiotic coffee and tea drinks
Good news for those who need a cuppa to start the day. Food scientists from the National University of Singapore have created new probiotic coffee and tea drinks that are packed with over 1 billion units of gut-friendly live probiotics. These non-dairy and plant-based beverages are can be stored chilled or at room temperature for more than 14 weeks. (2021-01-10)

Experts agree on new global definition of 'fermented foods'
Interdisciplinary scientists have come together to create the first international consensus definition of fermented foods. Their paper, published in Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology, defines fermented foods as: ''foods made through desired microbial growth and enzymatic conversions of food components''. (2021-01-05)

The incredible, variable bacteria living in your mouth
In a study published in Genome Biology researchers led by Harvard University examined the human oral microbiome and discovered tremendous variability in bacterial subpopulations living in certain areas of the mouth. In many cases, the team was able to identify a handful of genes that might explain a particular bacterial group's habitat specificity. (2020-12-18)

Nutrigenomics: new frontiers
Plant omics and food engineering offer novel perspectives and value to sustainable agriculture and ecological sciences (2020-12-10)

Scientists shed new light on how lung bacteria defend against pneumonia
New insight on how bacteria in the lungs protect against invading pathogens has been published today in the open-access eLife journal. (2020-12-08)

Can we improve our health with doses of safe, live microbes on a daily basis?
A group of scientists recently published a review paper in The Journal of Nutrition, covering evidence to date on the link between live dietary microbes and human health. (2020-12-03)

Follow your gut: How farms protect from childhood asthma
Asthma impacts millions of children already at a young age. Children growing up on a farm have a lower risk of developing asthma than children not living on a farm. The mechanisms behind this protective farm effect on childhood asthma are largely unknown. A group of researchers from Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Dr. von Hauner Children's Hospital of Ludwig Maximilians University Munich (LMU) clarified how the children's gut microbiome is involved in the protection process. (2020-11-02)

Biologists shed light on mystery of how microbes evolve and affect hosts
While associations between microbes and their hosts have long been known, little is known about how microbes evolve and how their evolution affects the health of their hosts. Now, researchers find that as microbes evolve and adapt to their unique hosts, they become less beneficial to hosts of other genotypes, suggesting that there is probably not one universally healthy microbiome and that transplanted microbes need time to adapt to a host before they bring benefits. (2020-11-02)

More turkey dinners for people with celiac disease?
An international team of researchers led by McMaster University has found that tryptophan, an amino acid present in high amounts in turkey, along with some probiotics, may help them heal and respond better to a gluten-free diet (2020-10-21)

Gut bacteria in multiple sclerosis: Probiotic or commensal, good or bad?
Though evidence suggests that the gut microbiome modulates risk of multiple sclerosis, new findings from the University of Vermont highlight complex interactions between host genetics and environmental factors impact susceptibility to multiple sclerosis. Strategies to prevent or treat multiple sclerosis should take into account host genetics, the pre-existing gut microbiome, and the timing or mode of the intervention. (2020-10-19)

Study finds gut microbiome plays important role in sleep regulation
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) affects more than one billion people worldwide. Evidence suggests OSA can alter the gut microbiome (GM) and may promote OSA-associated co-morbidities, including diabetes, hypertension and cognitive problems. Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have discovered how OSA-related sleep disturbances affect the gut microbiome in mice and how transplanting those gut bacteria into other mice can cause changes to sleep patterns in the recipient mice. (2020-09-23)

Evolution of radio-resistance is more complicated than previously thought
Radio-resistance in bacteria first evolves through the adaptation of DNA repair mechanisms, however as evolution continues more mutations accumulate, and more cellular metabolic processes are affected. It is not yet clear which panel of mutations provides high-level resistance. The study shows that acquisition of radio-resistance via evolution is possible independent of other mechanisms like extreme dryness resistance (desiccation). (2020-09-22)

Gut microbiota not involved in the incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus
Consuming the combination of fish oil and probiotic food supplements modulate the composition of gut microbiota in overweight and obese pregnant women, reveals a new study conducted at the University of Turku, Finland. The same study shows that gut microbiota composition and function is not related to gestational diabetes. (2020-09-09)

Gut microbes could allow space travelers to stay healthy on long voyages
Space travel is associated with a variety of negative health effects, including bone loss and mental health issues, which could limit our ability to undertake long-distance space missions, such as a mission to Mars. A new review highlights the potential of treatments that enhance gut microbes as a way to protect space travelers during long voyages. (2020-09-08)

Probiotics may help manage childhood obesity
Probiotics may help children and adolescents with obesity lose weight when taken alongside a calorie-controlled diet, according to a study being presented at e-ECE 2020. The study found that obese children who were put on a calorie-restricted diet and given probiotics Bifidobacterium breve BR03 and Bifidobacterium breve B632, lost more weight and had improved insulin sensitivity compared with children on a diet only. (2020-09-07)

Global gut health experts guide growth of synbiotics
Chances are you've heard of probiotics: supplements delivering 'good microbes' to the gut, providing a wide range of health benefits. You may also be aware of prebiotics: supplements designed to fuel the good microbes already living in our guts. The next wave of gut-health supplements, known as synbiotics, essentially combine pre- and probiotics. To keep research and development on the right track, an expert panel recently redefined the term and developed guidelines on scientific investigation. (2020-08-24)

Group of international scientists align on a definition for 'synbiotic'
To address the scientific ambiguity around synbiotics, a group of 11 leading international scientists formed a panel to create a consensus definition and to clarify the evidence required to show synbiotics are safe and effective. (2020-08-21)

Which bacteria truly qualify as probiotics?
Today, the word probiotic is used to describe all kinds of 'good' microorganisms in foods and supplements. Already, scientists have come up with a specific definition of probiotics, however, they have agreed that for a bacterial strain or strains to be called a probiotic, it should follow four simple criteria. Correct use of the term probiotic, per these criteria, will give consumers better transparency about the benefits when they consume products that contain live microorganisms. (2020-07-27)

Gut microbiota provide clues for treating diabetes
The individual mix of microorganisms in the human gastrointestinal tract provides vital clues as to how any future incidence of type 2 diabetes can be predicted, prevented and treated. This is demonstrated in a population study led from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. (2020-07-13)

Mom and baby share 'good bacteria' through breast milk
A new study by researchers at the University of British Columbia and the University of Manitoba has found that bacteria are shared and possibly transferred from a mother's milk to her infant's gut, and that breastfeeding directly at the breast best supports this process. (2020-07-10)

Increased risk of injury in contact sports after prolonged training restrictions
Athletes who play contact sports are being particularly hard-hit by the prolonged restrictions imposed on games and training, according to a new study. (2020-07-06)

Raw milk may do more harm than good
Raw or unpasteurized cows' milk from U.S. retail stores can hold a huge amount of antimicrobial-resistant genes if left at room temperature, according to a new study from researchers at the University of California, Davis. (2020-06-29)

Vitamin D could help mitigate chemotherapy side effects
New findings by University of South Australia researchers reveal that Vitamin D could potentially mitigate chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal mucositis and provide relief to cancer patients. (2020-06-17)

AGA does not recommend the use of probiotics for most digestive conditions
After a detailed review of available literature, the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) has released new clinical guidelines finding that for most digestive conditions there is not enough evidence to support the use of probiotics. This is the first clinical guideline to focus on probiotics across multiple GI diseases while also considering the effect of each single-strain or multi-strain formulation of probiotics independently instead of grouping them all under the single umbrella of 'probiotics.' These guidelines are published in Gastroenterology, AGA's official journal. (2020-06-09)

Probiotics with top-performing Lactobacillus strains may improve vaginal health
Vaginal Lactobacillus bacterial strains largely perform better than strains currently used in probiotics for vaginal health, according to a study published June 4 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Jo-Ann Passmore of the University of Cape Town, and colleagues. The findings suggest that a vaginal health probiotic that includes top-performing vaginal Lactobacillus strains may improve treatment options for bacterial vaginosis. (2020-06-04)

Bacteria fed by algae biochemicals can harm coral health
A new study led by researchers at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa and San Diego State University found that the outcome of the competition between coral and turf algae is determined by the assemblage of microbes at the interface where the contenders meet. The outcome is driven by bacteria that feed on algal-derived biochemicals, a phenomenon termed the Algal Feeding Hypothesis. (2020-06-02)

New review helps translate probiotic science into practical primary care recommendations
Probiotic supplements are widely available and are promoted as a general way to support the gut microbiome and promote health. A new publication in the Journal of Family Practice summarizes the latest evidence on using probiotics for a variety of specific health conditions, providing practical recommendations to assist primary care physicians in advising their patients. The article, authored by current International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics board members. (2020-06-01)

Humans have beneficial bacteria uniquely adapted for life in our noses
Researchers publishing May 26 in the journal Cell Reports suggest that some of these 'good' bacteria residing in our guts, genital tracts, and skin also have a niche in our noses. They found that people with chronic nasal and sinus inflammation had fewer lactobacilli in their upper respiratory tract than healthy controls and were able to identify a specific strain of the bacteria that has evolved to better survive the oxygen-rich environment of the nose. (2020-05-26)

Scientists explore links between genetics, gut microbiome and memory
Scientists have traced the molecular connections between genetics, the gut microbiome and memory in a mouse model bred to resemble the diversity of the human population. Researchers from two US Department of Energy national laboratories identified lactate, a molecule produced by all species of one gut microbe, as a key memory-boosting molecular messenger. (2020-04-29)

Probiotic intervention in ameliorating the altered CNS functions in neurological disorders
The review aims at giving a comprehensive analysis of the studies performed on animals and humans and discusses the findings in different neurological and psychiatric disorders (Anxiety, Major Depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorder, cognitive impairments etc). (2020-04-15)

The importance of probiotic names -- and why some of them have changed
A global group of scientists has published a paper announcing name changes for some of the bacteria that were historically grouped under the category of Lactobacillus. Members of the Lactobacillus genus are among the most popular bacteria found in consumer probiotic products and fermented foods. (2020-04-15)

Probiotics may help treat acne
Acne is caused by chronic inflammation and is often treated with antibiotics. A recent analysis published in Dermatologic Therapy indicates that probiotics may be an effective alternative. (2020-04-08)

The Lancet Gasteroenterology & Hepatology: First clinical trial finds probiotic treatment with dead bacteria is better than placebo at alleviating symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome
Probiotic bacteria that have been killed by heat can significantly improve symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) compared to placebo, and are not associated with any safety risk, according to a new 12-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial with 443 patients published in The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology journal. (2020-04-08)

A common gut microbe secretes a carcinogen
Cancer mutations can be caused by common gut bacteria. By exposing human mini-guts to a particular strain of Escherichia coli, scientist uncovered that these bacteria induce a unique mutational pattern in human DNA. This pattern was also found in colon cancer patients, implying that the bacteria induced these mutations. For the first time the researchers establish a direct link between microbes and mutations driving tumorigenesis. This might lead to new measures in colorectal cancer prevention. (2020-02-27)

Poop matters: Making the mouse gut microbiome more human-like
Caltech researchers find that when rodents are prevented from consuming feces, their small-intestine microbiota more closely resembles the microbial communities found in human intestines. (2020-02-13)

Gut feelings: Gut bacteria are linked to our personality
Sociable people have a higher abundance of certain types of gut bacteria and also more diverse bacteria, an Oxford University study has found. (2020-02-12)

Wasps' gut microbes help them -- and their offspring -- survive pesticides
Exposure to the widely used pesticide atrazine leads to heritable changes in the gut microbiome of wasps, finds a study publishing Feb. 4 in the journal Cell Host & Microbe. Additionally, the altered microbiome confers atrazine resistance, which is inherited across successive generations not exposed to the pesticide. (2020-02-04)

Bad to the bone: Specific gut bacterium impairs normal skeletal growth and maturation
Bone mass accrual is regulated by the gut microbiome as well as by diet and exercise. In a new report, researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina showed that a specific gut bacterium, segmented filamentous bacteria, influences particular immune responses in the gut and liver. These immune response changes lead to increased bone resorbing osteoclast and suppressed bone forming osteoblast activity, which impaired bone mass accrual during post-pubertal skeletal development. (2020-01-28)

Be wary of online probiotic health-benefit claims
A new study cautions that while Google is adept at sorting the most reliable websites to the top of the list, most websites providing information on probiotics are from unreliable commercial sources. The public should be wary of searching for probiotic information online as the majority of webpages originate from unreliable sources and health-benefit claims are often not supported by robust scientific evidence. (2020-01-15)

Gut bacteria could guard against Parkinson's, study finds
A common bacteria that boosts digestive health can slow -- and even reverse -- build-up of a protein associated with Parkinson's, new research suggests. (2020-01-14)

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