Current Product Development News and Events

Current Product Development News and Events, Product Development News Articles.
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Direct cloning method CAPTUREs novel microbial natural products
Microorganisms possess natural product biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) that may harbor unique bioactivities for use in drug development and agricultural applications. However, many uncharacterized microbial BGCs remain inaccessible. Researchers at Illinois previously demonstrated a technique using transcription factor decoys to activate large, silent BGCs in bacteria to aid in natural product discovery. (2021-02-19)

New study identifies top-performing point-of-care COVID-19 tests
Researchers screen rapid-detection COVID-19 tests for clinical sensitivity/specificity, limit of detection and time to results. (2021-02-10)

Infant and toddler food product names may not accurately reflect ingredient amounts
The descriptions on the fronts of infant and toddler food packages may not accurately reflect the actual ingredient amounts, according to new research. (2021-02-10)

Chemists developed a simplified method for pharmaceutical compounds synthesizing
A team of chemists from Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University and Saint Petersburg State University developed a simple and efficient method to synthesize tetrahydroisoquinolines--important organic molecules for drug discovery. The method consists of just three steps. (2021-02-09)

Front-of-package product names and ingredient lists of infant and toddler food can be hard to navigate
Early exposure to nutritious foods may help children develop more healthful eating habits, but package labels can make it difficult for parents to understand what they are feeding their young children, according to a new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier. (2021-02-08)

Use of goldenseal may compromise glucose control in diabetics on metformin
Diabetic patients taking the natural product goldenseal while taking the prescription drug metformin may be unwittingly sabotaging their efforts to maintain healthy blood glucose levels. Metformin--the world's most-prescribed oral glucose-lowering medication--was included in a cocktail of selected drugs given to participants in a clinical study led by scientists at Washington State University. The study found that after six days of taking goldenseal, participants had about 25 percent less metformin in their bodies. (2021-02-08)

The strange impact of the first consumer review
If you're about to buy something online and its only customer review is negative, you'd probably reconsider the purchase, right? It turns out a product's first review can have an outsized effect on the item's future -- it can even cause the product to fail. (2021-02-04)

BU study: New vaginal film, MB66, is safe
Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), Alpert Medical School of Brown University and Mapp Biopharmaceutical have now found that MB66, a vaginal film product containing monoclonal antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) and herpes simplex viruses types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and 2), is safe and effective. (2021-02-03)

New technology to detect bitter almonds in real time
Incorporating NIRS technology to almond analysis allows for quantifying amygdalin levels, the compound that causes the nut's bitter taste, on an industrial scale. (2021-01-29)

Dalian coherent light source reveals the origin of interstellar medium S2 fragments
Researchers observed the C+S2 product channel from CS2 photodissociation for the first time using a home-made Time-Sliced Velocity Map Ion Imaging (TS-VMI) experimental setup, based on the Dalian Coherent Light Source (DCLS). (2021-01-28)

New research: Monitoring online posts by consumers could help improve food safety
An estimated 48 million cases of foodborne illness are contracted in the U.S annually, causing about 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths, according to CDC. In some instances, the source is well known, but 80 percent of food poisoning cases are of unknown origin. In a new study published by the journal Risk Analysis, proposes a new Food Safety Monitoring System that utilizes consumer comments posted on websites to identify products associated with food-related illnesses. (2021-01-26)

Satellite data reveals bonds between emissions, pollution and economy
Burning fossil fuels has long powered world economies while contributing to air pollution and the buildup of greenhouse gases. A new analysis of nearly two decades of satellite data shows that economic development, fossil-fuel combustion and air quality are closely linked on the continental and national scales, but can be decoupled at the national level, according to Penn State scientists. (2021-01-26)

Automakers delay recalls to minimize stock penalties, avoid being the first safety issue in news
An initial recall by one firm prompts clusters of additional recalls in close proximity by competitor firms, according to 'Hiding in the Herd: The Product Recall Clustering Phenomenon,' forthcoming in Manufacturing and Service Operations Management from Kaitlin Wowak, assistant professor of IT, analytics, and operations at Notre Dame's Mendoza College of Business. (2021-01-19)

Dairy product purchasing differs in households with and without children
American dairy consumers are often influenced by a variety of factors that can affect their buying habits. These factors include taste, preference, government information, cultural background, social media, and the news. In an article appearing in JDS Communications, researchers found that households that frequently bought food for children are interested in dairy as part of their diet and purchased larger quantities of fluid milk and more fluid milk with a higher fat content. (2021-01-15)

Seawater as an electrical cable !? Wireless power transfers in the ocean
Toyohashi University of Technology research team has successfully transferred power and data wirelessly through seawater by using a power transmitter/receiver with four layers of ultra-thin, flat electrodes. Until now, it had been thought that wireless power transfers could only be achieved through magnetic coupling. This time, with a focus on the high-frequency properties of seawater, a third method for conductive coupling was devised, and a power transmitter/receiver was developed to achieve highly-efficient power transfers. (2021-01-13)

Youth using e-cigarettes three times as likely to become daily cigarette smokers
University of California San Diego Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Sciences researchers report that starting tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, before the age of 18 is a major risk factor for people becoming daily cigarette smokers. (2021-01-11)

Majority of biotech companies completing an IPO from 1997-2016 achieved product approvals
A large scale study from Bentley University of the biotechnology companies that completed Initial Public Offerings from 1997-2016 estimates that 78% of these companies are associated with products that reach phase 3 trials and 52% are associated with new product approvals. The article, titled 'Late-stage product development and approvals by biotechnology companies after IPO, 1997-2016,' shows that these emerging, public biotechnology companies continue to have a role in initiating new product development, but are no longer distinctively focused on novel, biological products. (2021-01-06)

A new TanSat XCO2 global product for climate studies
The 1st Chinese carbon dioxide (CO2) monitoring satellite mission, TanSat, was launched in 2016. The 1st TanSat global map of CO2 dry-air mixing ratio (XCO2) measurements over land was released as version 1 data product with an accuracy of 2.11 ppmv (parts per million by volume) in 2017. A new (version 2) TanSat global XCO2 product is now released. (2020-12-24)

Researchers develop new combined process for 3D printing
Chemists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have developed a way to integrate liquids directly into materials during the 3D printing process. This allows, for example, active medical agents to be incorporated into pharmaceutical products or luminous liquids to be integrated into materials, which allow monitoring of damage. The study was published in ''Advanced Materials Technologies''. (2020-12-16)

Crowdfunding can affect consumer product choices -- especially when the products do good
A new study from the UBC Sauder School of Business shows that people will pay far more for social good items when they're crowdfunded. (2020-12-16)

Irrelevant information interferes with making decisions, new research reveals
According to new research from behavioral economist Ian Chadd, an assistant professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, irrelevant information or unavailable options often cause people to make bad choices. When both elements are present, the probability of a poor decision is even greater. Through an experiment involving 222 individual tests each consisting of more than 40 questions, Chadd's research revealed that decisions made in an environment of irrelevant information carry time, cognitive, and consequence costs. (2020-12-14)

Negative reviews boost sales
Aleksei Smirnov, Assistant Professor, HSE University Faculty of Economic Sciences, and Egor Starkov, Assistant Professor, University of Copenhagen, have constructed a mathematical model that explains why it is advantageous for sellers not to delete negative reviews of their products. A study detailing this conclusion has been accepted for publication in The American Economic Journal: Microeconomics. (2020-12-11)

Princeton Chem reports role of quantum vibrations in electron transfer
Princeton Chemistry's Scholes Group is reporting evidence that quantum vibrations participate in electron transfer, establishing with ultrafast laser spectroscopy that the vibrations provide channels through which the reaction takes place. Seeking to establish an experimental proof for a highly contested topic - the role of vibrations in processes fundamental to solar energy conversion - Princeton researchers set out to map the progress of a photoinduced electron transfer (ET) reaction. (2020-12-10)

Which product categories and industries benefit most from social advertising
New research from a team of scientists at four leading universities has shed new light on the effectiveness of social advertising in specific product categories to learn which product categories tend to benefit more from social advertising, and which may not. (2020-12-10)

How clean electricity can upgrade the value of captured carbon
A team of researchers from University of Toronto Engineering has created a new process for converting carbon dioxide captured from smokestacks into commercially valuable products, such as fuels and plastics. (2020-12-07)

Blackcurrants are favorable for glucose metabolism
Blackcurrants have a beneficial effect on post-meal glucose response, and the required portion size is much smaller than previously thought, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. (2020-12-03)

Biodiesel made from discarded cardboard boxes
Dr. Sun-Mi Lee and her team at the Clean Energy Research Center of the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) have announced that they have developed a novel microorganism capable of producing biodiesel precursors from lignocellulosic biomass such as discarded agricultural by-products, waste paper, and cardboard boxes. This microorganism has achieved the product yield twice of what was obtainable from its predecessors. (2020-11-30)

When consumers trust AI recommendations--or resist them
The key factor in deciding how to incorporate AI recommenders is whether consumers are focused on the functional and practical aspects of a product (its utilitarian value) or on the experiential and sensory aspects of a product (its hedonic value). (2020-11-25)

Russian scientists improve 3D printing technology for aerospace composites using oil waste
Scientists from NUST MISIS have improved the technology of 3D printing from aluminum, having achieved an increase in the hardness of products by 1,5 times. The nanocarbon additive to aluminum powder, which they have developed, obtained from the products of processing associated petroleum gas, will improve the quality of 3D printed aerospace composites. The research results are published in the international scientific journal Composites Communications (2020-11-25)

New research shows Vype ePen 3 highly preferred by vapers
New research published today shows that Vype ePen 3, BAT's flagship vapour product, can provide smokers with similar levels of nicotine as standard cigarettes and, with exclusive use, could be used to avoid many of the risks associated with smoking. (2020-11-24)

Food health star ratings can improve diets, study finds
More evidence has emerged that food labelling can encourage manufacturers to improve product nutrition, but University of Melbourne experts say the star labelling system must be compulsory to make a big difference. (2020-11-20)

Seafood mislabeling is having negative impacts on the marine environment
As the most globally traded food commodity, seafood production and its supply chains are often complex and opaque. Contemporaneous with the increase in seafood consumption, evidence of mislabeling has become ubiquitous. Yet, little is known about the consequences of seafood mislabeling. New research by Advanced Conservation Strategies and colleagues show that conditions exist for mislabeling to generate negative impacts on marine populations and to support consumption of products from poorly managed fisheries. (2020-11-16)

Golden ticket: Researchers examine what consumers desire in chocolate products
Gold foil, ornate labels and an intriguing backstory are product characteristics highly desired by premium chocolate consumers, according to research conducted by food scientists in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences. The study is one of the first to thoroughly research what American premium chocolate consumers find to be desirable attributes in their chocolate bars. (2020-11-11)

Exoskeletons can reduce strain also in health care
Wearable exoskeletons are increasingly being used in physically demanding jobs to support good ergonomics and augment muscular strength. In ground-breaking studies led by researchers at Tampere University and LUT University in Finland, exoskeleton vests were worn by nurses to discover how the new technology would suit the special requirements of patient care. (2020-11-10)

When kids watch a lot of TV, parents may end up more stressed
The more TV kids watch, the more ads they see and the more likely they are to ask for things on shopping trips. That may contribute to parents' overall stress levels, researchers found. (2020-11-10)

Utilizing a 'krafty' waste product: Toward enhancing vehicle fuel economy
Researchers from Kanazawa University have chemically modified Kraft lignin -- ordinarily considered in the paper industry to be a waste product -- and used it to produce quality carbon fiber. When optimized in the future as an automotive structural material, it may reduce the fuel needed to power your car. (2020-11-05)

Smokers switching exclusively to glo significantly reduce exposure to certain toxicants
New study finds that smokers switching exclusively to glo significantly reduce their exposure to certain toxicants, potentially reducing risk of smoking-related disease (2020-11-05)

De novo protein decoys block COVID-19 infection in vitro and protect animals in vivo
Publication in Science by Neoleukin Therapeutics of research describing novel molecules designed to treat or prevent infection by the virus that causes COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2. Report details the creation of de novo protein decoys specifically designed to bind the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein with high affinity, preventing its association with the viral receptor hACE2, which is required for infection. ''De novo design of potent and resilient hACE2 decoys to neutralize SARS-CoV-2'' is available via Science First Release. (2020-11-05)

An artificial cell on a chip
Researchers at the University of Basel have developed a precisely controllable system for mimicking biochemical reaction cascades in cells. Using microfluidic technology, they produce miniature polymeric reaction containers equipped with the desired properties. This 'cell on a chip' is useful not only for studying processes in cells, but also for the development of new synthetic pathways for chemical applications or for biological active substances in medicine. (2020-10-28)

Mythbusting: 5 common misperceptions surrounding the environmental impacts of single-use plastics
Stand in the soda pop aisle at the supermarket, surrounded by rows of brightly colored plastic bottles and metal cans, and it's easy to conclude that the main environmental problem here is an overabundance of single-use containers: If we simply recycled more of them, we'd go a long way toward minimizing impacts. (2020-10-26)

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