Current Productivity News and Events

Current Productivity News and Events, Productivity News Articles.
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Study reveals energy sources supporting coral reef predators
Since Charles Darwin's day, the abundance of life on coral reefs has been puzzling, given that most oceanic surface waters in the tropics are low in nutrients and unproductive. But now research, led by Newcastle University and published in in the journal Science Advances, has confirmed that the food web of a coral reef in the Maldives relies heavily on what comes in from the open ocean. (2021-02-19)

Drone-based photogrammetry: A reliable and low-cost method for estimating plant biomass
Remote sensing technology has become an increasingly common tool used to measure plant productivity without the need for costly and time-consuming field-based measurements. However, the equipment typically used to remotely measure vegetation has remained prohibitively expensive. Here, researchers used a low-cost drone and camera to create a photomosaic of a tallgrass ecosystem. By comparing their results with measurements collected in the field, they demonstrate that photogrammetry is an accurate and reliable method of estimating biomass. (2021-02-12)

Garlic and selenium increase stress resistance in carps, says a RUDN University biologist
A biologist from RUDN University confirmed that selenium nanoparticles and garlic extract can effectively reduce the negative impact of stress on the health of grass carp in the breeding industry. (2021-02-04)

South Africa: the rising temperatures will cost up to 20% of per capita GDP
Reduced wage gap between high-skilled and low-skilled workers, and severe impacts on economic productivity. Climate change effects on economics and labour in a new study led by the CMCC Foundation and EIEE (RFF-CMCC European Institute on Economics and the Environment). (2021-02-02)

World's largest lakes reveal climate change trends
Sixteen years of remote sensing data reveals that in Earth's largest freshwater lakes, climate change influences carbon fixation trends. (2021-01-20)

Even a small amount of gender bias in hiring can be costly to employers
Tiny amounts of gender bias in employee hiring decisions contribute to concerning rates of discrimination and productivity losses that together represent significant costs, financial and otherwise, for employers. (2021-01-19)

Lack of managers keeps India's businesses small
In today's economy, American businesses often tap into professional management to grow, but most firms in India and other developing countries are family owned and often shun outside managers. A new study co-authored by Yale economist Michael Peters explores the effects that the absence of outside professional management has on India's businesses and the country's economy. (2021-01-14)

Smithsonian scientists reduce uncertainty in forest carbon storage calculations
Helene Muller-Landau, staff scientist was invited to write an authoritative review about carbon storage in forests. Her team combed through existing studies and came up with some novel conclusions of their own. (2021-01-13)

Possible explanation for more efficient maize growth
Plant researchers at Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) have investigated the transport of compounds in maize. They focused on the mechanism used to transport the products of photosynthesis for further distribution in the plant through its phloem loading pathways. In the current edition of the journal ''The Plant Cell'', they describe how this mechanism has potentially created a special evolutionary advantage for maize. (2021-01-08)

The true cost of chemotherapy
New research reveals the non-healthcare costs of chemotherapy for breast cancer patients. It includes the cost of lost productivity, work absence, and 'out-of-pocket' personal costs such as paying for transport and parking for treatment, the cost of wigs and new bras, and over the counter medications. The research team say that better targeting of treatment could help avoid placing unnecessary costs upon patients, their caregivers and wider society. (2021-01-04)

Water limitations in the tropics offset carbon uptake from arctic greening
More plants and longer growing seasons in the northern latitudes have converted parts of Alaska, Canada and Siberia to deeper shades of green. Some studies translate this Arctic greening to a greater global carbon uptake. But new research shows that as Earth's climate is changing, increased carbon absorption by plants in the Arctic is being offset by a corresponding decline in the tropics. (2020-12-18)

Green revolution saved over 100 million infant lives in developing world
New research from the University of California San Diego shows that since modern crop varieties were introduced in the developing world starting in 1961, they have substantially reduced infant mortality, especially for male babies and among poor households. (2020-12-17)

Carbon fertilization effects are declining worldwide, limiting their role in climate change mitigation
The widely observed carbon fertilization effects on plant photosynthesis worldwide are declining, researchers report in a new study. (2020-12-10)

Microbes and plants: A dynamic duo
The unique partnership between root-dwelling microbes and the plants they inhabit can reduce drought stress. (2020-12-09)

Nature s contributions to people found to be in decline
Over the past 50 years, declining biodiversity has put many of nature s contributions to people at risk. This is the conclusion reached by fifteen leading international experts, including a French ethnoecologist at the CNRS. Based on the IPBES Global Assessment, their work is the subject of an article, published this week in the journal PNAS, which discusses the risks to human well-being and prosperity resulting from the continuing degradation of the environment. (2020-12-09)

Human systems management critical for businesses during COVID-19
Amsterdam, NL, December 8, 2020 - The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted all types of organizations, leading human resources managers to reconsider their roles to support the implementation of social distancing practices, safety measures, and new ways of working. A special issue of Human Systems Management looks at the behavioral challenges posed by new ways of working and presents new models and tools to help organizations manage the transition. (2020-12-08)

Skoltech scientists run a 'speed test' to boost production of carbon nanotubes
Skoltech researchers have investigated the procedure for catalyst delivery used in the most common method of carbon nanotube production, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), offering what they call a ''simple and elegant'' way to boost productivity and pave the way for cheaper and more accessible nanotube-based technology. (2020-12-01)

Study finds COVID-19 hindering US academic productivity of faculty with young children
The academic productivity of higher education faculty In the United States in the science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM) fields with very young children suffered as a result of the stay-at-home orders during the early months of the coronavirus pandemic, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, the University of Florida College of Medicine, and the University of Michigan School of Medicine. (2020-12-01)

In temperate trees, climate-driven increase in carbon capture causes autumn leaves to fall sooner
For decades, scientists have expected that the shedding of leaves from temperate trees will get later and later under ongoing climate change. (2020-11-26)

Study shows minimal impact of APPs on ED productivity, flow, safety, patient experience
Advanced practice providers (APPs) have lower productivity compared with emergency department physicians, seeing fewer and less complex patients and generating less relative value units per hour, and having no apparent impact on patient satisfaction and safety metrics. (2020-11-25)

Gender differences in academic productivity during COVID-19 pandemic
During the COVID-19 pandemic, most science and medical faculty began working from home, with women reporting a significant decrease in manuscript submissions. Women also report providing 77.6% of the childcare themselves, compared to 61.3% for men, (2020-11-24)

WSU scientists discover new, simple way to classify marine biomes
Washington State University scientists have developed a new way to classify the ocean's diverse environments, shedding new light on how marine biomes are defined and changed by nature and humans. (2020-11-20)

Future lake food webs in subarctic have more biomass and contain more omega-3 fatty acids
Subarctic regions are facing rapid changes in climate and land-use intensity. An international research team recently completed an investigation to see how these changes are affecting the food webs and fish communities of lakes in northern Finland. Biomasses and omega-3 fatty acids, EPA and DHA, were determined from the algal producers at the base of food web to large carnivorous fish from 20 lakes along a pronounced climatic and productivity gradient. (2020-10-30)

Waste not, want not: recycled water proves fruitful for greenhouse tomatoes
In the driest state in the driest continent in the world, South Australian farmers are acutely aware of the impact of water shortages and drought. So, when it comes to irrigation, knowing which method works best is vital for sustainable crop development. (2020-10-29)

Artificial cyanobacterial biofilm can sustain green ethylene production for over a month
Ethylene is one of the most important and widely used organic chemicals. The research group at the University of Turku led by Associate Professor Yagut Allahverdiyeva-Rinne has designed a thin-layer artificial biofilm with embedded cyanobacterial cell factories which were specifically engineered for photosynthetic production of ''green'' ethylene. The fabricated biofilms have sustained ethylene production for up to 40 days. (2020-10-15)

Illinois research links soil nitrogen levels to corn yield and nitrogen losses
What exactly is the relationship between soil nitrogen, corn yield, and nitrogen loss? Most farmers would be forgiven for assuming a straightforward linear relationship: more nitrogen, more grain yield, and maybe, more loss. That's the assumption many nitrogen management models are based on, but it turns out there's very little published science to back up that assumption. (2020-10-13)

Lack of support prolongs unemployment
Unemployed persons whose appointment with the responsible caseworker at the employment office is canceled unexpectedly remain unemployed for an average of twelve days longer. This is what Bonn economist Amelie Schiprowski established in a study by the Cluster of Excellence ECONtribute: Markets & Public Policy at the Universities of Cologne and Bonn (Germany). (2020-10-08)

Cyanobacteria as "green" catalysts in biotechnology
Researchers from TU Graz and Ruhr University Bochum show in the journal ACS Catalysis how the catalytic activity of cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, can be significantly increased. This brings biotechnological and thus eco-friendly application a big step closer. (2020-10-05)

Reducing the high social cost of death
Researchers in Japan report on how bereavement can have far-reaching implications to an individual's health and their economic status. Deeper grief caused by the death of a loved one, correlates with an overarching decline in quality of life, seen in physical ailments, more down time, and higher rates of medical reliance. The report also highlights how you can possible predict who may need the most help in the future. (2020-10-05)

Ocean warming and acidification effects on calcareous phytoplankton communities
A new study led by researchers from the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) warns that the negative effects of rapid ocean warming on planktonic communities will be exacerbated by ocean acidification. (2020-09-30)

Scientists map freshwater transport in the Arctic Ocean
The Ob, Yenisei, and Lena rivers flow into the Kara and Laptev seas and account for about half of the total freshwater runoff to the Arctic Ocean. The transport and transformation of freshwater discharge in these seas have a large impact on ice formation, biological productivity, and many other processes in the Arctic. Russian researchers have investigated the spreading of large river plumes -- that is, freshened water masses formed as a result of river runoff mixing with ambient saltwater -- in the Russian Arctic seas. (2020-09-10)

Is APM the best way to evaluate NBA players?
A recent study by sport analytics professors shows the Adjusted Plus-Minus (APM) statistic used to evaluate the performance of NBA players is sometimes misleading because it does not accurately account for the quality of a player's teammates. (2020-09-07)

Char application restores soil carbon and productivity
After two years of char application, researchers find increased soil Carbon, magnesium, and sodium concentrations. (2020-08-27)

Scientists to discover the unique ductile properties of aluminum
During experiments on high-performance Wire Arc Additive Manufacturing (WAAM) researchers from Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) produced a metal with unique ductility. The ductility is three times higher than specified in the standard. The research results were published in a prestigious journal - ''Materials & Design''. (2020-08-26)

Study finds that water efficiency achievable throughout US without decree
Northern Arizona University researchers Ben Ruddell and Richard Rushforth, with collaborators throughout the country, looked at how much water conservation can readily and affordably be achieved in each region and industry by looking at what conservation measures were already working and considering how much water is being used. (2020-08-26)

Study identifies first step to beating water scarcity
New research has revealed the locations and industries in the USA where efforts to improve water consumption would have the greatest benefit for economic activity and the environment. The study, led by researchers from Virginia Tech, used a spatially detailed database of water productivity to set realistic benchmarks for more than 400 industries and products. It is published today in the IOP Publishing journal Environmental Research Letters. (2020-08-24)

Environment drivers of ecological complexity in marine intertidal communities
Environmental conditions such as sea surface temperature and the occurrence of cold water upwelling events drive the structure of interaction networks in marine intertidal communities via their effects on species richness, according to new research. (2020-08-17)

Dynamic membranes set to solve problems of liquid waste treatment
The co-authors, Associate Professor Dinar Fazullin and Associate Professor Gennady Mavrin, have been engaged in the topic of membrane elements for water purification for ten years. This research area is very pertinent because of the large volumes of liquid waste and a lack of specialized types of membranes. (2020-08-14)

Third breakthrough demonstrates photosynthetic hacks can boost yield, conserve water
Plants are factories that manufacture yield from light and carbon dioxide--but parts of this complex process, called photosynthesis, are hindered by a lack of raw materials and machinery. To optimize production, scientists from the University of Essex have resolved two major photosynthetic bottlenecks to boost plant productivity by 27 percent in real-world field conditions, according to a new study published in Nature Plants. This photosynthetic hack has also been shown to conserve water. (2020-08-10)

Success in promoting plant growth for biodiesel
Scientists of Waseda University in Japan succeeded in promoting plant growth and increasing seed yield by heterologous expression of protein from Arabidopsis (artificially modified high-speed motor protein) in Camelina sativa, which is expected as a useful plant for biodiesel. The study is expected to apply to other plant resources for biodiesel, such as corn, rice, and sugar cane. (2020-08-07)

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