Current Professional Development News and Events

Current Professional Development News and Events, Professional Development News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Viewed
Page 1 of 17 | 641 Results
Physical conditions linked to psychological distress in patients with cancer
Among patients with cancer, having additional physical comorbidities was linked with a higher risk of experiencing psychological distress. The finding comes from a Psycho-Oncology analysis of 2017 data from the National Health Survey of Spain. (2021-02-18)

Experts call for more pragmatic approach to higher education teaching
Millions of students around the world could benefit if their educators adopted a more flexible and practical approach, say Swansea University experts. After analysing the techniques current being used in higher education, the researchers have released a new paper calling for a pragmatic and evidence-based approach instead. (2021-01-22)

Embedded counseling services can improve accessibility for students, MU study finds
Kerry Karaffa is the first MU Counseling Center psychologist to be embedded specifically within the University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine, where he provides tailored counseling services for professional students training to become veterinarians. (2021-01-21)

Counseling clients of color affected by COVID-19
An article published in the Journal of Counseling & Development examines how pre-existing racial and ethnic disparities, exacerbated by COVID-19, have negatively affected communities of color that tend to be overrepresented in lower socioeconomic groups, have limited access to health care and education, have an undocumented status, and work in jobs considered ''essential.'' (2020-12-10)

How religion can hamper economic progress
Study from Bocconi University on impact of antiscientific curricula of Catholic schools on accumulation of human capital in France during the 2nd Industrial Revolution could hold lessons on impact of religion on technological progress today. (2020-11-13)

Building your professional brand in a prestigious job
Individuals trying to manage their professional brands while holding prestigious posts should strive to strike a balance between benefiting from the affiliation while at the same time maintaining their professional independence. (2020-11-11)

Facing up to the reality of politicians' Instagram posts
A University of Georgia researcher used computer vision to analyze thousands of images from over 100 Instagram accounts of United States politicians and discovered posts that showed politicians' faces in nonpolitical settings increased audience engagement over traditional posts such as politicians in professional or political settings. (2020-10-29)

Researchers discover 'Marie Kondo' protein which aids in organizing fruit fly embryos
Researchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine have discovered a protein in fruit fly embryos, dubbed Marie Kondo, that destroys maternal proteins. Much like namesake, author and clutter consultant Marie Kondo, this gene removes unnecessary molecules, keeping embryos organized. (2020-07-28)

The injury rate of dominant leg of soccer players is identical with the non-dominant one
The severity of knee joints damage in soccer players depends on their age and career duration, and the condition of articular cartilage and meniscus of the dominant and the non-dominant leg does not differ. However, even pronounced changes can be asymptomatic and do not impair knee joint mobility, as shown by a group of scientists, which included researchers from the Sechenov University. The findings which will help interpret the results of players clinical examination more accurately, were published in Sports Medicine - Open. (2020-06-22)

Undisclosed financial conflicts of interest in Canadian clinical guidelines on medications
Failure to disclose organizational financial conflicts of interest by producers of Canadian clinical practice guidelines on medications is widespread, pointing to the need for reform, a new research paper highlights in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.191737. (2020-06-08)

The economic gap also affects the consumption of screens by children
The presence and variety of mobile devices in Spanish households, regardless of social and economic circumstances, has been mainstream for years. Several studies focus on parental mediation in children's consumption of smart screens, although there is a lack of scientific evidence concerning how the level of training and the professional profile of mothers and fathers affect children's digital media consumption. (2020-05-12)

Despite millennial stereotypes, burnout just as bad for Gen X doctors in training
Despite the seemingly pervasive opinion that millennial physicians are more prone to burnout and a lack of empathy compared to older generations, a new study of 588 millennial and Generation X residents and fellows by researchers at Northwestern Medicine and Cleveland Clinic found that no such generational gap exists. (2020-05-05)

Emergence of deadly honey bee disease revealed
Honey bee colonies from across the UK are increasingly suffering from a viral disease, a new study has shown. Publishing their findings in the journal Nature Communications, the team led by Professor Giles Budge of Newcastle University, UK, found that the number of honey bee colonies affected with chronic bee paralysis rose exponentially between 2007 and 2017. (2020-05-01)

Big ideas in performance management 2.0
Industrial-era performance management paradigms and practices are outdated and ineffective in the modern VUCA work environment. SIOP presents a video examining how to update performance management practices for success now and in the future of work. Presented by SIOP Fellow Alan Colquitt, PhD, the video 'webinar' provides actionable, evidence-based insights for I-O psychologists, business leaders, and HR practitioners seeking to create better outcomes for workers and organizations through practices fostering engagement and strong workplace performance. (2020-02-19)

Clinical practice guideline approval process introduces potential conflicts of interest
A new study of the approval processes used by the 43 medical-specialty-society members of the Council of Medical Specialty Societies in the US to create evidence-based guidelines finds that most use an approval procedure that has the potential to undermine editorial independence of the guideline development committee. (2020-02-13)

Prescribing for self, family, and friends widespread among young Irish doctors, poll shows
Prescribing for self, family, friends and colleagues is widespread among young Irish doctors, suggest the results of a survey, published online in the Journal of Medical Ethics. (2019-12-03)

Use of locum doctors rising despite limited evidence on quality and safety
There is little hard evidence to support the widely held perception that locum doctors present a greater risk of causing harm to patients, according to new research published by the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. (2019-11-11)

Examination of conscience on the role of engineering in sustainable development
In a study conducted by 3 engineers, Josep Maria Basart (UAB), Mireia Farr├║s (UPF) and Montse Serra (UOC) presented in an article published in September in the journal IEEE Technology and Society Magazine. (2019-10-29)

Lowest-paid workers have longest retirements
The study examined the length of time between stopping work and dying among people in England and Wales born before 1951. It found that people in 'unskilled' occupations lived the longest after retiring, while professional workers -- the other end of the social scale -- had the shortest retirements on average. (2019-10-23)

Emory researchers find college football players' weight gain leads to heart problems
Weight gain and high blood pressure in college football players leads to adverse changes in cardiac structure and function, indicating monitoring and early intervention is needed for this young and otherwise healthy athletic population, according to a new study by Emory University researchers. (2019-10-23)

Consensus report shows burnout prevalent in health care community
Clinician burnout is affecting between one-third and one-half of all of US nurses and physicians, and 45 to 60% of medical students and residents, according to a National Academy of Medicine (NAM) report released today. (2019-10-23)

Escapism: A powerful predictor of internet gaming disorder among video gamers
A new study in Comprehensive Psychiatry, published by Elsevier, is the first to compare professional electronic sport (esport) players with recreational video game players and explores the similarities and differences between what motivates each group. While the two groups are psychosocially different, they found that both esport and recreational gamers run the risk of developing internet gaming disorder when their intense immersion in the activity is tied to escapism. (2019-10-22)

Taxi drivers face highest levels of black carbon compared to other professional drivers
Professional drivers working in congested cities are exposed to black carbon levels that are on average a third higher than would be experienced at a busy roadside, according to research presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress. The research also found that taxi drivers experience the highest exposures to black carbon, an indicator of diesel engine fumes, compared to couriers, truck drivers, waste removal and emergency service workers. (2019-09-28)

Predictable esports: Amateurs and professionals sit differently in a chair
A group of scientists from Skoltech, the MIPT, and the State University of Aerospace Instrumentation in St. Petersburg has won the Best Paper Award at the prestigious fifth IEEE International Conference on Internet of People (IoP 2019) for research on artificial intelligence, which established a connection between an esports player's movements and skill level. The research findings show that machine learning methods can accurately predict a player's skill level in 77% of cases. (2019-09-13)

Specialized training benefits young STEM researchers
The First-year Research Immersion (FRI) program at Binghamton University, State University of New York has proven that young college students are capable of leading real research. And according to a new study, students in FRI do better when the instructors who oversee their projects are provided extra training. (2019-09-12)

Professional coaching alleviates burnout symptoms in physicians
Medical doctors in the United States are twice as likely to experience symptoms of burnout as other workers, which can compromise quality of care and place patients at risk. In a study in JAMA Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic researchers suggest a new approach to fighting burnout: external professional coaching. (2019-08-05)

Marital infidelity and professional misconduct linked, study shows
People who cheat on their spouses are significantly more likely to engage in misconduct in the workplace, according to a study from the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. (2019-07-30)

At last, an AI that outperforms humans in six-player poker
Achieving a milestone in artificial intelligence (AI) by moving beyond settings involving only two players, researchers present an AI that can outperform top human professionals in six-player no-limit Texas hold'em poker, the most popular form of poker played today. (2019-07-11)

Mentoring becomes more widely accepted as a part of teacher training methodology
As the authors posit, contemporary pedagogical ideas and approaches cannot fully satisfy the existing graduate requirements because of rapid informatization, intellectualization and technological progress. (2019-07-02)

Helping physics teachers who don't know physics
A shortage of high school physics teachers has led to teachers with little-to-no training taking over physics classrooms, reports show. This has led to additional stress and job dissatisfaction for those teachers -- and a difficult learning experience for their students. But new research indicates that focused physics professional development for teachers -- even those who have no prior physics training--can lead to better experiences for both students and teachers, and can improve students' understanding of physics concepts. (2019-06-25)

U of Guelph study finds health professionals need to be cautious on social media
Posting a single negative comment to Facebook may hinder health professionals' credibility with current or potential patients, a new University of Guelph study reveals. (2019-06-17)

American football: The first quarter is crucial
Researchers from Dartmouth College, New Hampshire have found evidence that players born in the first quarter of the year are more likely to play in the National Football League. (2019-06-14)

Psychological model of defectologist's readiness for professional development
In this new paper, the researchers theorize that professional competences of a defectologist (a Russian term for educators engaged in assisted teaching for disabled individuals) rely on their psychological readiness for such a profession. (2019-06-04)

Advancing dementia and its effect on care home relationships
New research published today in the journal Dementia by researchers from the University of Chichester focuses on the effects of behavioral change due to dementia in a residential care home setting. Its findings are based on a survey of professional care-givers who shared their own experiences of the deterioration of the carer/cared-for relationship as dementia advances. (2019-06-03)

Transcendental Meditation reduces compassion fatigue and improves resilience for nurses
Nurses can better cope with the burnout that's endemic to the profession by practicing the Transcendental Meditation® technique, according to a new study published today in the Journal for Nurses in Professional Development. After four months of practice, standardized assessments found that nurses in the study had reductions in 'compassion fatigue' and burnout, and increases in compassion satisfaction and resilience. The study highlights the importance that self-care plays for professional development and longevity in nursing. (2019-02-27)

IQWiG supported professional societies in the development of new S3 guideline
Commissioned by the Federal Ministry of Health, the Institute searched for studies on vaginal ('natural') birth and assessed them. The guideline group appreciates the high quality of the reports. (2019-02-12)

How common are mental health disorders, treatment in children?
An estimated 7.7 million children in the United States (16.5 percent) have at least one mental health disorder and about half didn't receive treatment from a mental health professional. National survey data were used to estimate how common mental health disorders were in children at the national and state levels, along with how common mental health care use was in children. An estimated 46.6 million children were included for analysis and prevalence estimates varied widely by state. (2019-02-11)

Female graduates who wear 'sexy clothes' seen as less capable than counterparts
Females who dress 'sexily' at their graduation are perceived as being less competent and are believed to have performed worse in their degree than their peers who dress more professionally, new research from the University of Surrey reports. (2019-01-29)

School counselors reflect on their experience following student deaths
When five school counselors who were part of a counseling team were interviewed to learn how they professionally and personally experienced the deaths of multiple students in one year in their school while attending to the needs of the school community, several themes emerged. The Journal of Counseling & Development study's first theme, gravity of the losses, related to the significance of the losses the counseling team and broader school community experienced as each student died. (2019-01-09)

Women build less effective professional networks than men as they underestimate self-worth
A study, published by SAGE Publishing today in the journal Human Relations, contributes to this ongoing discussion, revealing that it is not only exclusion by men, but also self-imposed barriers including hesitation and gendered modesty that prevent women from networking as effectively as their male counterparts. The research revealed that women's tendencies to harbor moral concerns about 'exploiting' social ties causes them to under-benefit from networking activities. (2018-11-15)

Page 1 of 17 | 641 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.