Current Prosthetic Limbs News and Events

Current Prosthetic Limbs News and Events, Prosthetic Limbs News Articles.
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This robot doesn't need any electronics
Engineers at the University of California San Diego have created a four-legged soft robot that doesn't need any electronics to work. The robot only needs a constant source of pressurized air for all its functions, including its controls and locomotion systems. The team, led by Michael T. Tolley, a professor of mechanical engineering at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego, details its findings in the Feb. 17, 2021 issue of Science Robotics. (2021-02-17)

New surgery may enable better control of prosthetic limbs
MIT researchers in collaboration with surgeons at Harvard Medical School have devised a new type of amputation surgery that can help amputees better control their residual muscles and receive sensory feedback. This restored sense of proprioception should translate to better control of prosthetic limbs, as well as reduction of limb pain, the researchers say. (2021-02-15)

Researchers replicate a potential step of the fin-to-limb transition in zebrafish
By tweaking a single gene, scientists engineered zebrafish that show the beginnings of limb-like appendages. The researchers stumbled upon this mutation, which may shed light on the sea-to-land transition of vertebrates, while screening for gene mutants and their impact on fish development. Their discovery, outlined February 4th in the journal Cell, marks a fundamental step in our understanding of fin-to-limb evolution and how simple genetic changes can create leaps in the development of complex structures. (2021-02-04)

Can a fin become a limb?
Researchers at Harvard and Boston Children's Hospital examine what's happening at genetic level to drive patterns in fin skeleton versus limb skeleton and find mutants with modified fins in a more limb-like pattern by adding new bones, complete with muscles and joints. The results reveal the ability to form limb-like structures was present in the common ancestor of tetrapods and teleost fishes and has been retained in a latent state which can be activated by genetic changes. (2021-02-04)

Surprising new research: We're more like primitive fishes than once believed
People traditionally think that lungs and limbs are key innovations that came with the vertebrate transition from water to land. But in fact, the genetic basis of air-breathing and limb movement was already established in our fish ancestor 50 million years earlier. This, according to a recent genome mapping of primitive fish conducted by the University of Copenhagen, among others. The new study changes our understanding of a key milestone in our own evolutionary history. (2021-02-04)

Textile sensor patch could detect pressure points for amputees
A soft, flexible sensor system created with electrically conductive yarns could help map problematic pressure points in the socket of an amputee's prosthetic limb, researchers from North Carolina State University report in a new study. (2021-02-02)

Solar material can 'self-heal' imperfections, new research shows
A material that can be used in technologies such as solar power has been found to self-heal, a new study shows. (2021-01-26)

From fins to limbs
In a new study an international team of researchers examined three-dimensional digital models of the bones, joints, and muscles of the fins and limbs of two extinct early tetrapods and a closely related fossil fish and discover these early tetrapods had a very distinct pattern of muscle leverage that didn't look like a fish fin or modern tetrapod limbs and their limbs were more adapted for propulsion rather than weight bearing. (2021-01-22)

Using VR training to boost our sense of agency and improve motor control
Patients with motor dysfunctions are on the rise across Japan as its population continues to age. A Tohoku University researcher has developed a new method of rehabilitation using virtual reality to increase the sense of agency over our body and aid motor skills. (2021-01-20)

Perceiving prosthesis as lighter thanks to neurofeedback
Transmitting sensory signals from prostheses to the nervous system helps leg amputees to perceive prosthesis as part of their body. While amputees generally perceive their prostheses as heavy, this feedback helps them to perceive the prostheses as significantly lighter, ETH researchers have shown. (2021-01-08)

Even after long-term exposure, bionic touch does not remap the brain
A new study by neuroscientists at the University of Chicago and Chalmers University of Technology demonstrates that the brain does not remap itself even with long-term bionic limb use, posing challenges for the development of realistic prosthetic limbs. (2020-12-22)

The 'crazy beast' that lived among the dinosaurs
New research published today in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology describes a bizarre 66 million-year-old mammal that provides profound new insights into the evolutionary history of mammals from the southern supercontinent Gondwana - recognized today as Africa, South America, Australia, Antarctica, the Indian subcontinent, and the Arabian Peninsula. (2020-12-18)

A new evolutionary clue
Colleen B. Young, a graduate student in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Missouri, tested several popular assumptions about the characteristics of Homo floresiensis by comparing an island fox from California's Channel Islands with its mainland US relative, the gray fox. (2020-12-09)

Water-to-land transition in early tetrapods
The water-to-land transition is one of the most important major transitions in vertebrate evolution. However, there is still uncertainty about when the water-land transition took place and how terrestrial early tetrapods really were. A new paper in Nature addresses these questions and shows although these early tetrapods were still tied to water and had aquatic features, they also had adaptations that indicate some ability to move on land. (2020-11-25)

From fins to limbs and water to land
The study shows how and when the first groups of land explorers became better walkers than swimmers. The analysis spans the fin-to-limb transition and reconstructs the evolution of terrestrial movement in early tetrapods. (2020-11-25)

To push or to pull? How many-limbed marine organisms swim
Couinter-intuitively, small marine animals don't use their limbs or propulsors to push themselves through the water while swimming. Instead, their appendages create negative pressure behind them that pulls the animal through the water, scientists from the Marine Biological Laboratory report. (2020-11-24)

New process narrows the gap between natural and synthetic materials
Skin and cartilage are both strong and flexible - properties that are hard to replicate in artificial materials. But a new fabrication process, developed by scientists at EPFL, brings lifelike synthetic polymers a step closer. (2020-11-19)

Do octopuses' arms have a mind of their own?
Octopuses are strange creatures, with three hearts, eight arms and a nervous system distinct from any other animal. These fiercely intelligent creatures are jam-packed with over 500 million neurons, but over two thirds of these neurons are located within their arms and body. Many scientists therefore think that octopuses' arms act independently from the brain, but a study in Current Biology suggests that an octopus' arms and brain are more connected than previously thought. (2020-11-02)

Early indications of thrombosis help in preventing postoperative complications
It is well-known that surgeries can be complicated by life-threatening thromboses that are hard to predict and not easy to prevent. The authors managed to find a new prognostic laboratory sign of the imminent postoperative thrombosis; remarkably, this sign appears on the first postoperative day, a few days before deep vein thrombosis of the lower limbs develops. (2020-10-27)

Low cost, customized prosthesis using 3D printing
The Singapore University of Technology and Design, together with Singapore's Tan Tock Seng Hospital, developed a novel 3D printed non-metallic self-locking prosthetic arm for a patient with a forequarter amputation - it is more comfortable, flexible and 20% cheaper than a conventional prosthesis. (2020-10-26)

World's greatest mass extinction triggered switch to warm-bloodedness
Mammals and birds today are warm-blooded, and this is often taken as the reason for their great success. (2020-10-16)

Best materials for border molding in complete dentures fabrication
Application of border molding procedure in the treatment of edentulous jaws (toothlessness in either jaw) increases retention and stability of the prosthesis. In a study in the open-access journal Folia Medica, scientists determined the best impression materials for the procedure. After border molding, the negative pressure between the custom tray and the prosthetic field is created. This is an informal indication for a good impression. Quantitative measurement of negative pressure is possible under clinical conditions. (2020-10-06)

The biomimetic hand prosthesis Hannes uniquely similar to a human hand
Researchers from Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia and Centro Protesi INAIL in Italy reported on Science Robotics about the prosthetic hand Hannes able to replicate the key biological properties of the human hand. Hannes is able to restore over 90% of functionality to people with upper-limb amputations. It owns CE marking and it is ready to enter the international medical market, but its future commercialization will be possible only when researchers will identify investors and industrial partners (2020-09-23)

Computational study of famous fossil reveals evolution of locomotion in 'ruling reptiles'
Scientists from the University of Bristol and the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) used three-dimensional computer modelling to investigate the hindlimb of Euparkeria capensis-a small reptile that lived in the Triassic Period 245 million years ago-and inferred that it had a ''mosaic'' of functions in locomotion. (2020-09-21)

Real neurons are noisy. Can neural implants figure that out?
Signals sent from the retina to the brain have a lot of background noise, yet we see the world clearly. Duke researchers show that to achieve visual clarity the brain must accurately measure how this noise is distributed across neurons when processing the signals sent down the optic nerve. These results are likely to shape the design of future retinal prosthetics and other brain-machine interfaces. (2020-09-15)

First 'plug and play' brain prosthesis demoed in paralyzed person
In a significant advance, researchers working towards a brain-controlled prosthetic limb at the UC San Francisco Weill Institute for Neurosciences have shown that machine learning techniques helped a paralyzed individual learn to control a computer cursor using their brain activity without requiring extensive daily retraining, which has been a requirement of all past brain-computer interface (BCI) efforts. (2020-09-07)

New study examines long-term aesthetic outcomes of implant-based breast reconstruction
Breast reconstruction is an important option for women undergoing mastectomy, and a two-stage approach using implants is by far the most common reconstruction technique. Thousands of women undergo this procedure every year - despite the conventional wisdom among many surgeons that the results of implant-based breast reconstruction don't hold up over the long term. (2020-08-28)

Roadmap for linking neurological and locomotor deficits
Scientists capture highly-detailed ''locomotor signatures'' of mouse models of neurological disease. This approach provides a novel way of mapping locomotion disorders onto their underlying neural circuits. (2020-08-24)

Massive, well-preserved reptile found in the belly of a prehistoric marine carnivore
Paleontologists have found a giant ichthyosaur skeleton containing one of the longest fossils ever found in the stomach of a prehistoric marine reptile--the skeleton of a four-meter-long aquatic reptile called a thalattosaur. While the researchers can't say for sure whether it was scavenged or preyed upon, it could be the oldest direct evidence that Triassic marine reptiles like ichthyosaurs--previously thought to be cephalopod feeders--were apex megapredators. The findings appear August 20th in the journal iScience. (2020-08-20)

Ichthyosaur's last meal is evidence of triassic megapredation
Some 240 million years ago, a dolphin-like ichthyosaur ripped to pieces and swallowed another marine reptile only a little smaller than itself. Then it almost immediately died and was fossilized, preserving the first evidence of megapredation, or a large animal preying on another large animal. (2020-08-20)

Exoskeleton research marches forward with NIST study on fit
Exoskeletons, many of which are powered by springs or motors, can cause pain or injury if their joints are not aligned with the user's. To help manufacturers and consumers mitigate these risks, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) developed a new measurement method to test whether an exoskeleton and the person wearing it are moving smoothly and in harmony. (2020-08-20)

Lungfish fins reveal how limbs evolved
New research on the fin development of the Australian lungfish by an international team of researchers from the University of Konstanz (Germany), Macquarie University in Sydney (Australia) and the Stazione Zoologica Anton Dohrn in Naples (Italy) elucidates how fins evolved into limbs with hands with digits. The main finding is that in lungfish a primitive hand is already present, but that functional fingers and toes only evolved in land animals due to changes in embryonic development. (2020-08-19)

Research story tip: Horse skeletons provide clues to preventing racehorse injuries
In an anatomical comparison of the third metacarpal, or cannon bone, among Thoroughbred racehorses, American Quarter Horses and feral Assateague Island ponies, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers have found that fostering adaptations in these bones through training might help horses better endure the extreme conditions of racing and prevent serious, often life-ending injuries on the track. (2020-08-18)

Simultaneous stimulation helped a spinal cord injury patient regain the ability to walk
At the BioMag Laboratory, the first promising results have been achieved in the application of synchronised electrical and magnetic stimulation therapy when rehabilitating a paraplegic patient and restoring his ability to walk. (2020-08-17)

EULAR: Amputations of body parts: The combination of diabetes and gout significantly increases
Compared to the average population, people suffering from both gout and diabetes have a 25 times higher risk of requiring an amputation of peripheral limbs such as feet, toes or lower legs. This is the result of a study presented by experts from the US at the virtual annual congress of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) 2020. (2020-08-13)

KIST finds clue to improve artificial vision for patients with retinitis pigmentosa
A Korean research team has reported important findings that could potentially improve the performance of retinal prostheses creating artificial vision for blind individuals. The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) had found retinal neural signals arising from electric stimulation are altered depending on disease progression in mice affected by outer retinal degeneration. This research was done in collaboration with Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital. (2020-08-10)

Bone-anchored leg prostheses also prove to be a valuable procedure after 5-year follow-up
After above-knee amputation, there is the option of a prosthesis that is placed directly in the thigh bone. Despite the fact that bone-anchored prostheses have been used for thirty years, researchers at Radboudumc have published the first long-term evaluation. It turns out that the procedure is not without stoma problems, but that these can usually be treated with simple measures and that the implant leads to a permanent improvement in mobility and quality of life. (2020-08-06)

How thoughts could one day control electronic prostheses, wirelessly
The current generation of neural implants record enormous amounts of neural activity, then transmit these brain signals through wires to a computer. But, so far, when researchers have tried to create wireless brain-computer interfaces to do this, it took so much power to transmit the data that the implants generated too much heat to be safe for the patient. A new study suggests how to solve his problem -- and thus cut the wires. (2020-08-04)

Phage therapy shows potential for treating prosthetic joint infections
Bacteriophages, or phages, may play a significant role in treating complex bacterial infections in prosthetic joints, according to new Mayo Clinic research. The findings suggest phage therapy could provide a potential treatment for managing such infections, including those involving antibiotic-resistant microbes. (2020-07-23)

Spinal stimulators repurposed to restore touch in lost limb
Devices commonly implanted for chronic pain could expand patient access to prosthetic arms that ''feel.'' (2020-07-21)

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