Current Proteins News and Events

Current Proteins News and Events, Proteins News Articles.
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First observation of the early link between proteins linked to Alzheimer's disease
Study conducted by researchers from the GIGA CRC In vivo Imaging laboratory at ULiège demonstrates, for the first time in humans, how the first deposits of tau proteins in the brainstem are associated with neurophysiological processes specific to the early stages of Alzheimer's disease development. (2021-01-25)

New biochemical clues in cell receptors help explain how SARS-CoV-2 may hijack human cells
The SARS-CoV-2 virus may enter and replicate in human cells by exploiting newly-identified sequences within cell receptors, according to work from two teams of scientists. (2021-01-21)

Basis for the essential cellular powerhouses
Researchers have solved the operating mode of the barrel pore protein assembly in the mitochondrial outer membrane (2021-01-15)

Following the hops of disordered proteins could lead to future treatments of Alzheimer's disease
Researchers from the University of Cambridge, the University of Milan and Google Research have used machine learning techniques to predict how proteins, particularly those implicated in neurological diseases, completely change their shapes in a matter of microseconds. (2021-01-14)

Quantum computers to study the functioning of the molecules of life
A breakthrough that has implications for molecular biology, pharmacology and nanotechnologies. The fields of application are many. Identifying the mechanisms behind neurodegenerative processes in some proteins, for example, can help limit their proliferation. Understanding how a protein takes on a certain shape can open the way to use the nanomachines that nature has designed to cut, edit or block damaged or defective genes. Their study was published in the international academic journal Physical Review Letters (2021-01-14)

Treating an autoimmune disease in mice with an mRNA vaccine
Christina Krienke and colleagues have designed an mRNA vaccine that delayed the onset of and reduced the severity of multiple sclerosis-like disease in mice. (2021-01-07)

HKUST researchers discover a novel mechanism of recruiting ARF family proteins to specific subcellul
Researchers of the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) recently uncovered a novel molecular mechanism that regulates the subcellular localizations of Arf proteins, shedding light on the mechanism underlying various inherited diseases and offering new insight to the treatment of them. (2021-01-05)

Protein twist and squeeze confers cancer drug resistance
In 1986, cellular biochemist Kazumitsu Ueda, currently at Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS), discovered that a protein called ABCB1 could transport multiple chemotherapeutics out of some cancer cells, making them resistant to treatment. How it did this has remained a mystery for the past 35 years. Now, his team has published a review in the journal FEBS Letters, summarizing what they have learned following years of research on this and other ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter proteins. (2020-12-29)

The ABCs of species evolution
Almost four decades of research have led scientists at Japan's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) to propose that a family of transporter proteins has played an important role in species evolution. One protein in particular, called ABCA1, was likely crucial for vertebrate evolution by helping regulate when signals involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and migration enter a cell. This process was necessary for vertebrates to develop into more complex organisms with sophisticated body structures. (2020-12-23)

BioAFMviewer software for simulated atomic force microscopy of biomolecules
Atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows to obtain images and movies showing proteins at work, however with limited resolution. The developed BioAFMviewer software opens the opportunity to use the enormous amount of available high-resolution protein data to better understand experiments. Within an interactive interface with rich functionality, the BioAFMviewer computationally emulates tip-scanning of any biomolecular structure to generate simulated AFM graphics and movies. They greatly help in the interpretation of e.g., high-speed AFM observations. (2020-12-22)

Newly discovered receptor helps to sneak a peek at evolution
Certain proteins call for unusual ways to get incorporated into membranes, because the signal sequence required for this process is located at their rear end instead of at the front. The relevant mechanism and its components are well-known and well-studied in yeast and mammals. Scientists have already hypothesised that it also occurs in plants, but there was no evidence of an indispensable receptor, until now. (2020-12-22)

Corona: How the virus interacts with cells
Scientists from Würzburg and the US have charted the first global atlas of direct interactions between SARS-CoV-2 RNA and human host cells. This may provide a starting point for novel treatments. (2020-12-21)

Diseased cell fragments burst from pockets in immune cells to activate response
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have uncovered an important process in how our immune system detects signs of disease and activates a protective response. This understanding could improve efforts to find new and effective immunotherapy treatments for diseases like cancer. (2020-12-21)

Covid-19: contaminated surfaces as a risk factor
The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic poses a threat to the health of millions of people worldwide. Respiratory viruses, including the pathogen SARS-CoV-2, can be transmitted both via the air and through contact with contaminated objects. Scientists from the Department of Technical and Macromolecular Chemistry at Paderborn University have investigated what promotes the adhesion of viruses to surfaces. This involved examining the proteins that make up the viral envelope. (2020-12-18)

Scientists create a new phototoxic protein, SuperNova2
Scientists have developed an enhanced version of SuperNova, a genetically encoded phototoxic synthesizer, that helps control intracellular processes by light exposure. 'We expect that the genetically encoded photosensitizer SuperNova2 will find use in a wide range of experimental models,' Konstantin Lukyanov, a professor at the Skoltech Center of Life Sciences (CLS), comments. (2020-12-17)

Research strongly suggests COVID-19 virus enters the brain
The SARS-CoV-2 virus, like many viruses before it, is bad news for the brain. In a study published Dec. 16, 2020 in Nature Neuroscience, researchers found that the spike protein, often depicted as the red arms of the virus, can cross the blood-brain barrier in mice. The spike proteins alone can cause brain fog. Since the spike protein enters the brain, the virus also is likely to cross into the brain. (2020-12-17)

Fibrous protein finding may lead to improved bioprinting, tissue engineering
Fibrous proteins such as collagen and fibrinogen form a thin solid layer on the surface of an aqueous solution similar to the 'skin' that forms on warm milk, according to a team of Penn State Researchers, who believe this finding could lead to more efficient bioprinting and tissue engineering. (2020-12-17)

How a very "sociable" protein can hold clues about Alzheimer's origin
An international team of scientists led by the ESRF, the European Synchrotron, have found how the ECSIT protein dictates the behaviour of proteins linked to the energy activity in mitochondria, which is largely affected in Alzheimer's disease. Their results are published today in Angewandte Chemie. (2020-12-16)

New salmonella proteins discovered
Only one small protein needs to be missing and salmonellae are no longer infectious. This was discovered in a study in which the pathogens were re-analysed using bioinformatics. (2020-12-16)

The human helpers of SARS-CoV-2
Proteins are the functional units of the cell and enable the virus to enter the host cell or help the virus to replicate. Scientists from Charité -- Universitätsmedizin Berlin and from the Berlin Institute of Health (BIH), along with colleagues from the United Kingdom, Germany and the United States, have examined the corresponding genes of the helper proteins in a large study. (2020-12-16)

Proteins enable crop-infecting fungi to 'smell' food
New UC Riverside research shows the same proteins that enable human senses such as smell also allow certain fungi to sense something they can eat. (2020-12-15)

The uncharted molecular language of the brain
A novel method that looks at the molecular composition of brain synapses has revealed three times more proteins than previously thought, finds research published in PNAS. (2020-12-14)

Researchers find why 'lab-made' proteins have unusually high temperature stability
Efforts to enhance the ability of proteins to resist breaking down, or 'denaturing', at high temperatures is one of the hottest topics in biotech. Researchers have now identified some of the principles behind how this works, potentially opening up a raft of industrial applications for designer proteins. (2020-12-11)

New and unexplored dimension in the study of protein-protein interactions
Cells accumulate glutamate and related molecules under stress, and so formation of high-order protein assemblies under these conditions has important biological implications. Specifically, this would represent a mechanism by which the presence of stressor compounds in the cell could control DNA replication. (2020-12-09)

Development of a new method for decoding viral genes
A research team led by Professor Yasushi Kawaguchi of the Institute of Medical Science, the University of Tokyo, developed a new decoding method for viral genes that can easily and quickly obtain even non-canonical genetic information. Using this new decoding method, they identified nine novel proteins encoded by herpes simplex virus type 1(HSV-1) and found that one of them, piUL49, is a pathogenic factor that specifically controls the onset of herpes encephalitis . (2020-12-07)

Synthetic llama antibodies rescue doomed proteins inside cells
Columbia researchers created a new technology using synthetic llama antibodies to protect endangered proteins inside cells. The technology could treat dozens of diseases. (2020-12-07)

A recipe for protein footprinting
By publishing their method in the journal Nature Protocols, chemists have opened doors for fellow scientists to better address research questions related to Alzheimer's disease, the COVID-19 pandemic and more. (2020-12-07)

Correctly delivered and integrated: How proteins find their place in the cell
Over a quarter of all proteins in a cell are found in the membrane. To fulfil their roles, membrane proteins must be reliably transported from their site of production to their destination and correctly inserted into the target membrane. Researchers from Heidelberg University have succeeded in determining the three-dimensional structure of a molecular machine responsible for the correct placement of so-called 'tail-anchored' membrane proteins. (2020-12-03)

Cell membranes in super resolution
For the first time ever, expansion microscopy allows the imaging of even the finest details of cell membranes. This offers new insights into bacterial and viral infection processes. (2020-12-02)

Plants on aspirin
For centuries humans were using willow barks to treat a headache or an inflamed tooth. Later, the active ingredient, the plant hormone salicylic acid, was used to develop painkillers like Aspirin. But what happens, if plants are treated with these painkillers? By doing so, Scientists at the Institute of Science and Technology (IST) Austria discovered an unexpected bioactivity of human pharmaceuticals in plants. The scientists published their study in the journal Cell Reports. (2020-12-01)

AI solution to a 50-year-old science challenge could 'revolutionise' medical research
Proteins form the machinery that keep all animals, plants and bacteria alive and well. Understanding the complex shapes of proteins is key to the study of life on earth as well as to tackling almost all human diseases. Despite fifty years of work, scientists have struggled to find an accurate and efficient method to determine the shapes of proteins, but researchers now say an artificial intelligence solution has been found. (2020-11-30)

Getting to the core of nuclear speckles
Scaffold of sub-cellular structures identified after a hundred years. (2020-11-28)

An ionic forcefield for nanoparticles
Nanoparticles are promising drug delivery tools but they struggle to get past the immune system's first line of defense: proteins in the blood serum that tag potential invaders. Now, Harvard researchers have developed an ionic forcefield that prevents proteins from binding to and tagging nanoparticles. In mouse experiments, nanoparticles coated with the ionic liquid survived significantly longer in the body than uncoated particles. (2020-11-25)

Princeton scientists discover a motif that guides assembly of the algal pyrenoid
Princeton University researchers have discovered that assembly of the algal pyrenoid, a structure that mediates the incorporation of carbon dioxide into sugars, is guided by the presence of a particular protein sequence, or motif. The study describing this breakthrough, by researchers Moritz Meyer, Martin Jonikas, and colleagues, appeared November 11, 2020 in the open-access journal Science Advances. (2020-11-25)

Proteins in motion
Membrane proteins are more efficient at reaching distal dendrites than soluble proteins (2020-11-21)

Folding of SARS-CoV2 genome reveals drug targets -- and preparation for 'SARS-CoV3'
For the first time, an international research alliance has observed the RNA folding structures of the SARS-CoV2 genome with which the virus controls the infection process. Since these structures are very similar among various beta corona viruses, the scientists not only laid the foundation for the targeted development of novel drugs for treating COVID-19, but also for future occurrences of infection with new corona viruses that may develop in the future. (2020-11-20)

Study: How saliva is made
In the TV series, 'How It's Made,' viewers often discover that common objects like pencils or rubber bands are quite complicated to make. The show walks people through complex production processes that lie behind familiar items. A new paper in Cell Reports does the same for saliva, breaking down, in detail, where the multitude of proteins floating in our saliva originate. (2020-11-17)

Illuminating tiny proteins in living cells using single-residue labeling tags
SciLifeLab Fellow Simon Elsässer laboratory at Karolinska Institutet reports a method, which allows fluorescent tagging of proteins with the small perturbation -- a single amino acid -- added genetically on either end of a (micro)protein of interest. The method is termed Single-residue Terminal Labeling, STELLA. (2020-11-12)

Nothing but the truth in the fight against cancer
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) have found that TruB1, a protein known to be involved in RNA modification, can directly bind to and promote the maturation of the microRNA let-7. This novel function of TruB1 can also reduce rates of cell proliferation. This unique anti-cancer role of this protein is crucial information that will assist with the development of novel cancer therapeutics. (2020-11-09)

Peering under the "hood" of SARS-CoV-2
Microscope and protein data are incorporated into an easy-to-use-and-update tool that can model an organism's 3D appearance. (2020-11-08)

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