Current Psoriasis News and Events | Page 4

Current Psoriasis News and Events, Psoriasis News Articles.
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Study casts doubt about link between eczema, cardiovascular disease
Despite mixed evidence recently about an association between atopic dermatitis and cardiovascular disease, a new study that analyzed more than 250,000 medical records suggests there is no link. (2017-06-16)

Persistent pain shows up inefficiency of current psoriatic arthritis (PsA) treatment
The results of two studies presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology 2017 press conference have highlighted limitations in the current treatment of patients with Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA). (2017-06-15)

Cellular stress increases the probability of developing autoimmune diseases
Researchers found that cellular stress enhances the activation of certain type of immune cells with implications in many chronic inflammatory conditions. (2017-06-13)

Promising new treatment option for chronic plaque psoriasis
The study tested the efficacy of tildrakizumab, an antibody that targets only a very specific immune system pathway. More than 60 percent of all patients who received the active medication showed improvement, compared to less than 10 percent of patients who received placebos. (2017-06-06)

Bacteria used as factories to produce cancer drugs
Researchers at the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability in Denmark have developed a method of producing P450 enzymes -- used by plants to defend against predators and microbes -- in bacterial cell factories. The process could facilitate the production of large quantities of the enzymes, which are also involved in the biosynthesis of active ingredients of cancer drugs. (2017-06-02)

Secukinumab and ixekizumab in psoriasis: Considerable added benefit for certain patients
There were notably more remissions than under the comparator therapies. In future, the analysis of symptoms should not be limited to improvements at one time point. (2017-06-02)

Cancer therapy shows promise for psoriasis treatment
HDAC inhibitors, already widely used to treat cancer, may be an effective therapy for psoriasis as well, scientists report. (2017-05-31)

Handheld scanner reveals vascularization in psoriasis patients
A newly developed tissue scanner allows looking under the skin of psoriasis patients. This provides clinically relevant information, such as the structure of skin layers and blood vessels, without the need for contrast agents or radiation exposure. A team of researchers from Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) recently introduced the technology in Nature Biomedical Engineering. (2017-05-31)

An inflammatory inference
The surface proteins responsible for navigating immune cells to sites of inflammation are identified. (2017-05-25)

Drug for refractory psoriatic arthritis shows promise in clinical trial
In a pivotal phase-3 clinical trial led by a Stanford University School of Medicine investigator, patients with psoriatic arthritis for whom standard-of-care pharmaceutical treatments have provided no lasting relief experienced a significant reduction in symptoms, including joint tenderness and swelling, when they were given a new drug. (2017-05-24)

Largest psoriasis meta-analysis to date yields new genetic clues
The identification of 16 additional genetic markers will help researchers get closer to understanding how -- and why -- psoriasis develops. (2017-05-24)

Tracking cancer's signaling pathways
Malignant melanoma is one of the most common and dangerous types of cancer. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg investigated how and why brown pigmented moles turn into malignant melanoma using innovative robot technology. The insights gained can simplify methods of diagnosis in the future; furthermore, they suggest that certain cosmetic products and creams should be avoided. (2017-05-23)

TWEAKing inflammation
Superficially, psoriasis and atopic dermatitis may appear similar but their commonalities are only skin deep. Atopic dermatitis, also known as eczema, is primarily driven by an allergic reaction, while psoriasis is considered an autoimmune disease. Nevertheless, researchers at La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology were able to pinpoint a common driver of skin inflammation in both diseases. (2017-05-22)

Cutting-edge analysis reveals how different drugs interact with the same target
Osaka University-led researchers identified differences in how three drugs bind to tumor necrosis factor, a key mediator of inflammatory disease. The team used sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation to investigate drug-target binding in a physiological environment and at clinically-relevant concentrations. They revealed differences between the three drugs in the size and structure of the complexes formed, which may explain differences in the drugs' clinical efficacy. This technique could help optimize future drug design. (2017-05-14)

Cannabinoids may soothe certain skin diseases, say CU Anschutz researchers
Cannabinoids contain anti-inflammatory properties that could make them useful in the treatment of a wide-range of skin diseases, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. (2017-04-18)

Severe psoriasis predominantly affects men
The fact that men are overrepresented in psoriasis registers and consume more psoriasis care have long led researchers to believe that the common skin disease disproportionately affects men. A unique study with 5,438 Swedish psoriasis patients now reveals that women have a statistically significant lower incidence of severe psoriasis compared to men. The study, conducted by researchers at Umeå University and Karolinska Institutet, is published in the American Journal of Clinical Dermatology. (2017-03-24)

Study highlights possible Achilles' heel in key immune memory cells
Genes involved in lipid metabolism are highly active in TRM cells, roughly 20- to 30-fold more active than in other types of T-cells. (2017-03-09)

Study examines burden of skin disease worldwide
How much do skin diseases contribute to the burden of disease worldwide? (2017-03-01)

Study defines global burden of skin disease
A study published today in JAMA Dermatology combines the prevalence of skin diseases around the world with their likelihood of creating disability across the lifespan to define the following 10 most challenging conditions (arranged in order of decreasing 'disability-adjusted life years'): dermatitis, acne, hives, psoriasis, viral skin diseases, fungal skin diseases, scabies, melanoma, pyoderma, cellulitis, non-melanoma skin cancer, decubitus ulcer, and alopecia areata. (2017-03-01)

Autoimmune disease may be linked to heightened dementia risk
Autoimmune disease may be linked to a heightened risk of dementia, indicates a large long term study, published in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health. (2017-03-01)

Inflammatory disease trigger revealed
Institute scientists have revealed a potent inflammatory molecule released by dying cells triggers inflammation during necroptosis, a recently described form of cell death linked to inflammatory disease. The discovery could lead to new and existing medicines that target the molecule being investigated as a way of treating inflammatory diseases, such as psoriasis and inflammatory bowel disease. (2017-02-22)

Depression puts psoriasis patients at significantly greater risk of psoriatic arthritis
Psoriasis is a lifelong disease that is associated with significant cosmetic and physical disability and puts patients at increased risk for many major medical disorders. A multidisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Calgary, Canada, have found that psoriasis patients who developed depression were at a 37 percent greater risk of subsequently developing psoriatic arthritis, compared with psoriasis patients who did not develop depression. Their findings are published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology. (2017-02-22)

Treatment has no sufficient effect in 1 of 5 psoriasis patients
A substantial part of people, one in five, undergoing systemic treatment for psoriasis (i.e. pills taken orally, injections or infusions) still have considerable problems with their disease. This is according to a study with 2,646 Swedish psoriasis patients conducted by researchers at Umeå University and the Swedish Institute for Health Economics, and recently published in the Journal of Dermatological Treatment. (2017-02-02)

Why thick skin develops on our palms and soles, and its links to cancer
Scientists from Queen Mary University of London have discovered that foot callouses/keratoderma (thickened skin) can be linked to cancer of the esophagus (gullet), a disease which affects more than 8,000 people in the UK each year. (2017-02-01)

Genetics play a significant role in immunity, new research finds
Nearly three-quarters of immune traits are influenced by genes, new research from King's College London reveals. (2017-01-05)

Review examines diversity in dermatology clinical trials
Racial and ethnic groups can be underrepresented in medical research. So what is the makeup of participants in randomized clinical trials of common dermatologic conditions? A review article published online by JAMA Dermatology attempts to answer that question. (2017-01-04)

Weight loss reduces psoriasis symptoms
Weight loss has a significant and prolonged positive impact on psoriasis symptoms and quality of life. The findings stem from a study conducted by Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, in collaboration with the University of Copenhagen's Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports and other participants. The results are published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, an internationally renowned scientific journal. (2016-12-22)

'Master regulator' in genes may make women more susceptible to autoimmune diseases
New research identifies an inflammatory pathway in women that could help explain why they develop autoimmune diseases at a much higher rate than men. (2016-12-19)

Immune system's 'workaround' may explain heart disease in psoriasis patients
Two new studies out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine describe how the inflammatory response to psoriasis can alter levels of several immune system molecules, ultimately increasing a person's risk of thrombosis, which can include fatal blood clots. (2016-12-08)

An agent used to treat psoriasis may be aimed at the wrong target
The antibody ustekinumab is being used successfully for the treatment of psoriasis since 2009. It inhibits the underlying inflammation by neutralizing certain messengers of the immune system. Researchers at the University of Zurich and the Center of Allergy and Environment in Munich have now shown that one of these messengers could actually be helpful in battling the disease. (2016-11-30)

GW dermatologist publishes survey finding fungal skin infections commonly misdiagnosed
Fungal skin infections may be commonly misdiagnosed, according to a survey published by a George Washington University dermatologist in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology. (2016-11-17)

Psoriatic arthritis patients find condition difficult to diagnose and often misunderstood
Psoriatic Arthritis In America 2016, is a new national survey by Health Union of over 500 individuals suffering from psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The results reveal that the diagnosis process is often frustrating and lengthy, and that most patients experience multiple symptoms before leading to a diagnosis. In addition, respondents reported difficulty explaining often invisible symptoms that progress and become more debilitating over time. (2016-11-16)

Women & long-term axial spondyloarthropathy patients at higher risk for manifestations
Gender and disease duration can help predict which axial spondyloarthritis patients will develop extra-articular manifestations such as uveitis, or inflammation of the eye, according to new research findings presented this week at the 2016 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington. (2016-11-12)

Skin bacteria could protect against disease
There are more and more examples of the ways in which we can benefit from our bacteria. According to researcher Rolf Lood from Lund University in Sweden, this is true for the skin as well. He has shown that the most common bacteria on human skin secrete a protein which protects us from the reactive oxygen species thought to contribute to several skin diseases. The protein has an equally strong effect on dangerous oxygen species as known antioxidants such as vitamin C and vitamin E. (2016-11-11)

Samumed selected for 7 presentations in 5 therapeutic areas at ACR 2016
Samumed, a leader in tissue regeneration, has been selected to feature seven presentations in five different therapeutic areas at the 2016 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Annual Meeting from Nov. 11-16. Samumed's presentations will focus on the application of the company's novel, small-molecule Wnt pathway inhibitor compounds to treat the underlying pathology leading to the symptoms rather than the symptoms alone of the following diseases: Chronic Tendinopathy, Degenerative Disc Disease, Scleroderma, Osteoarthritis and Psoriasis. (2016-11-01)

Genomic testing could speed research on skin disease, bring new drugs to patients faster
When a person suffering from psoriasis starts taking a new therapy, it can currently take months to assess if the drug is working. But according to a recent study, that process could be significantly sped up with genomic testing and analysis. (2016-10-19)

Anti-inflammatory drugs could help treat symptoms of depression, study suggests
Anti-inflammatory drugs similar to those used to treat conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis could in future be used to treat some cases of depression, concludes a review led by the University of Cambridge, which further implicates our immune system in mental health disorders. (2016-10-18)

New study links neuropilin 2 deficiency to inflammation-induced edema & lymphedema
Edema frequently occurs in chronic inflammatory diseases including psoriasis and eczema. Capillaries in the lymphatic system usually drain the excess fluid but their dysfunction can lead to another serious condition: lymphedema. A new study published in The American Journal of Pathology found that deficiency in neuropilin 2 (Nrp2) receptors in vascular endothelial cells results in excessive and prolonged fluid build-up after inflammation. This discovery may guide investigators toward new pharmacological therapies for edema and lymphedema. (2016-10-14)

Comparing coronary artery calcium scores in patients with psoriasis, diabetes
Assessing coronary artery calcium (CAC) is a measure of the severity of atherosclerosis (clogged arteries) and a cornerstone for screening for risk of future cardiac events. The inflammatory skin condition psoriasis has been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Type 2 diabetes is a high-risk disease associated with increased cardiovascular risk. (2016-08-24)

Research opens up new treatment route for inflammatory rheumatism
Enthesitis, inflammation of tendons where they attach to the bone, is a common medical problem which underlies various forms of inflammatory rheumatism. Although around 1 percent of the population is affected, the mechanisms driving this type of inflammatory condition is poorly understood. Research by Professor Dirk Elewaut, in collaboration with Professor Geert van Loo at VIB's inflammation research center, is now changing this. (2016-08-23)

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