Current Psychology News and Events

Current Psychology News and Events, Psychology News Articles.
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Study suggests teacher-student bonds may be especially important for homeless kids
A recent study of homeless preschoolers found a strong correlation between the bonds those children formed with teachers and the children's risk of behavioral and emotional problems. (2021-02-22)

Basque ethnic identity and collective empowerment are associated with wellbeing
A member of the Culture, Cognition and Emotion research group at the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque country has explored how social identification with Basque speakers and collective psychological empowerment relate to personal and social wellbeing and community participation. Individuals who experience a high degree of identification with Basque speakers and a high degree of empowerment have been seen to display higher indices of wellbeing. (2021-02-19)

Body shape, beyond weight, drives fat stigma for women
Fat stigma in women contributes to poor medical outcomes and negatively affects educational and economic opportunities. A new study from scientists at Arizona State University and Oklahoma State University shows that body shape, beyond overall weight, drives fat stigma. Women with overweight and obesity who carry gluteofemoral fat were less stigmatized than those who carry abdominal fat. These findings could affect how interventions for overweight and obesity are designed and delivered. (2021-02-17)

University of Limerick research finds new link between personality and risk of death
Ground-breaking research led by University of Limerick, Ireland has revealed for the first time that the immune system directly links personality to long-term risk of death. (2021-02-17)

Dark-skinned teens, females prime targets of acne's psychological fallout
A more aggressive approach to treating acne that marries the disciplines of psychology and dermatology is needed, according to two UC Riverside psychology researchers. They also assert that women and people with darker skin disproportionately suffer from acne's psychological impacts. (2021-02-12)

Northwestern scholar to talk about science of teams in space at AAAS
Noshir Contractor, along with Leslie DeChurch and NASA researcher Suzanne Bell, developed a computational model that predicts interpersonal conflicts between team members (such as astronauts) with 75-80% accuracy and prescribes interventions to repair their interactions and relationships. (2021-02-10)

New research investigates relationship between health literacy and self-care
It is important for patients to understand the necessary information for making health decisions, yet studies have shown that a large segment of the population lacks the health literacy to do so. Jessie Chin, School of Information Sciences at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, and colleagues have investigated the relationship between health literacy and ''actionable memory,'' or memory for medication purposes, among diabetic patients. They report their results in the Journal of General Internal Medicine. (2021-02-02)

Use of pronouns may show signs of an impeding breakup
Evidence of an impending breakup may exist in the small words used in everyday conversations months before either partner realizes where their relationship is heading, according to new psychology research. (2021-02-01)

Football and inclusion: It all comes down to the right motivational climate
Playing football has the potential to promote the inclusion of young people who are not from the predominant culture of a country, i.e. young migrants. Crucially, the feeling of belonging and being accepted depends on the trainer's approach to training - or more precisely, the motivational climate they create. Task-oriented training is significantly more suitable than training that is geared towards performance and competition. (2021-01-29)

Family's our focus during pandemic, study finds
More fully appreciating family and engaging in more conflict are among the heightened experiences during the coronavirus pandemic, according to a new UC Riverside study. (2021-01-29)

Children cannot ignore what they hear when detecting emotions
Children determine emotion by what they hear, rather than what they see, according to new research. The first-of-its-kind study, by Durham University's Department of Psychology, looked at how children pick up on the emotions of a situation. They found that whilst adults prioritised what they see, young children showed an auditory dominance and overwhelmingly prioritised what they could hear. The researchers say their findings could benefit parents currently managing home learning and professional educators. (2021-01-26)

Competition among human females likely contributed to concealed ovulation
Humans are among the few species that lack overt physical indicators of female fertility. One explanation for concealed ovulation in human females is that hiding fertility from males helps females secure resources from males for raising children. A new model developed by a team of evolutionary scientists casts doubt on this idea, showing that females might have evolved to conceal ovulation from one another, not from males. (2021-01-25)

Borderline personality disorder: Don't ignore it
Borderline Personality Disorder is treatable. New University of Houston research is the first to show that adolescent borderline pathology follows a similar downward course after discharge from inpatient treatment previously demonstrated for adults. (2021-01-25)

Study says friends are most valued in cultures where they may be needed most
Researchers from Michigan State University reveal cultural and health benefits of close human relationships in a new study. (2021-01-21)

Study: Religion, psychology share methods for reducing distress
Religious people facing life crises rely on emotion-regulation strategies that psychologists also use, a new study finds. They look for positive ways of thinking about hardship, a practice known to psychologists as ''cognitive reappraisal.'' They also tend to have confidence in their ability to cope with difficulty, a trait called ''coping self-efficacy.'' Both have been shown to reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression. (2021-01-08)

Otago study identifies 'three pillars' of good mental health for young adults
Getting good quality sleep, exercising, and eating more raw fruits and vegetables predicts better mental health and well-being in young adults, a University of Otago study has found. (2020-12-15)

Using play to "school" children's emotions
Pretend play is a pedagogical tool that can be used to stimulate a child's socio-emotional competences. A curriculum based on this approach has been introduced in classes of pupils aged five and six by a research team from the University of Geneva and the Valais University of Teacher Education . The study evaluating the effects of the programme shows that pupils who followed the curriculum increased their emotional recognition capacities and emotional lexicon compared to a control group. (2020-12-14)

Oregon researchers find that like adults, children by age 3 prefer seeing fractal patterns
By the time children are 3 years old they already have an adult-like preference for visual fractal patterns commonly seen in nature, according to University of Oregon researchers. (2020-12-11)

Study finds gamblers ignore important information when placing bet
People with gambling problems are less likely to consider important information that could prevent them from losing, according to new research published today from the UBC's Centre for Gambling Research. (2020-12-03)

UBC study explores link between social status and trust in decision-makers
A recent study examining perceptions of power suggests that individuals with lower socioeconomic statuses are more likely to have a negative view of policy or decision-makers. (2020-12-03)

Why people become defensive and how to address it
Research published in the British Journal of Social Psychology has shown that defensiveness in response to wrongdoing is exacerbated by making the wrong doer feel like they're an outcast. (2020-12-01)

Preschool children can't see the mountains for the cat
Imagine seeing an image of a cat in front of a wide scene of mountains and being told just to remember the mountains if you saw them in a later picture. As an adult, that's not hard to do. But a new study shows that, even when told to pay attention to the mountain, preschool children focus so much on the cat that they won't later recognize the same mountain. (2020-11-30)

Being alone and socializing with others each contributes differently to personal growth
Researchers from Bar-Ilan University analyzed self-generated text from more than 1,700 participants who performed a sentence-completion task regarding their experience alone and their social experience when in the company of others. The results showed that a combination of constructive alone and social experiences best contributes to the formation of an integrated self. (2020-11-19)

Be mindful: Study shows mindfulness might not work as you expect
If dispositional mindfulness can teach us anything about how we react to stress, it might be an unexpected lesson on its ineffectiveness at managing stress as it's happening, according to new research from the University at Buffalo. When the goal is ''not to sweat the small stuff,'' mindfulness appears to offer little toward achieving that end. (2020-11-13)

Trust levels in AI predicted by people's relationship style, study shows
A University of Kansas interdisciplinary team led by relationship psychologist Omri Gillath has published a new paper in the journal Computers in Human Behavior showing people's trust in artificial intelligence (AI) is tied to their relationship or attachment style. (2020-10-29)

Lie detection -- Have the experts got it wrong?
Researchers led by the University of Portsmouth carried out a critical analysis of the Model Statement lie detection technique and the results have been published today in the Journal of Investigative Psychology and Offender Profiling. There are concerns that the use of the technique is dangerous in the pursuit of criminal justice and researchers are calling for an urgent review of its practice. (2020-10-15)

Why some friends make you feel more supported than others
It's good to have friends and family to back you up when you need it - but it's even better if your supporters are close with each other too, a new set of studies suggests. Researchers found that people perceived they had more support from a group of friends or family who all knew and liked each other than from an identical number of close relationships who were not linked. (2020-10-07)

Feline friendly? How to build rap-paw with your cat - new psychology study
A team of psychologists at the Universities of Sussex and Portsmouth have discovered a way for humans to bond with cats. (2020-10-07)

Internet gaming youth not more prone to psychiatric disorders
Children who show addiction-like gaming signs are not any more susceptible to mental health problems than their non-gaming peers. Some even experience less anxiety than others. (2020-10-01)

Study shows quizzes improve academic performance
Students who are quizzed over class material at least once a week tend to perform better on midterm and final exams compared to students who did not take quizzes, according to a new Iowa State University meta-analysis. The researchers found in addition to frequency, immediate feedback from instructors also seemed to positively impact student performance. (2020-09-17)

People's life goals relate to their personality type, UC Davis study suggests
A new University of California, Davis, study suggests that for the most part, people formulate goals consistent with their personality traits. (2020-09-16)

People react better to both negative and positive events with more sleep
New research from UBC finds that after a night of shorter sleep, people react more emotionally to stressful events the next day--and they don't find as much joy in the good things. This has important health implications: previous research shows that being unable to maintain positive emotions in the face of stress puts people at risk of inflammation and even an earlier death. (2020-09-15)

Gender harassment and institutional betrayal in high school take toll on mental health
High school students who endure gender harassment in schools that don't respond well enter college and adulthood with potential mental health challenges, according to a University of Oregon study. Researchers found that 97 percent of women and 96 percent of men from a pool of 535 undergraduate college students had endured at least one incident during high school. (2020-09-14)

Experiments reveal why human-like robots elicit uncanny feelings
Experiments reveal a dynamic process that leads to the uncanny valley, with implications for both the design of robots and for understanding how we perceive one another as humans. (2020-09-10)

Children notice race several years before adults want to talk about it
Adults in the United States believe children should be almost 5 years old before talking with them about race, even though some infants are aware of race and preschoolers may have already developed racist beliefs, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association. (2020-08-27)

Why babies not always remember what they have learned
If and how babies recall what they have learned depends on their mood: what they've learned when feeling calm is inaccessible when they're acitive and vice versa. This was shown in a study conducted by developmental psychologists at Ruhr-Universit├Ąt Bochum (RUB) with 96 children aged nine months. They published their report in the journal ''Child Development'' from 19. August 2020. (2020-08-21)

Smartphones are lowering student's grades, study finds
The ease of finding information on the internet is hurting students' long-term retention and resulting in lower grades on exams, according to a Rutgers University-New Brunswick study. (2020-08-18)

Jealous feelings can act as a tool to strengthen friendships
Jealousy can be important for maintaining friendships, which are crucial to physical and emotional health. A study conducted by scientists at Arizona State University, Oklahoma State University, and Hamilton College found feelings of jealousy were sensitive to the value of the friendship and motivated behaviors aimed at keeping friends. (2020-08-11)

Racial discrimination linked to suicide
New research findings from the University of Houston indicate that racial discrimination is so painful that it is linked to the ability to die by suicide, a presumed prerequisite for being able to take one's own life, and certain mental health tools - like reframing an incident - can help. (2020-08-03)

Laughter acts as a stress buffer -- and even smiling helps
People who laugh frequently in their everyday lives may be better equipped to deal with stressful events - although this does not seem to apply to the intensity of laughter. These are the findings reported by a research team from the University of Basel in the journal Plos One. (2020-07-30)

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