Current Psychosis News and Events

Current Psychosis News and Events, Psychosis News Articles.
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Machine learning could aid mental health diagnoses
A way of using machine learning to more accurately identify patients with a mix of psychotic and depressive symptoms has been developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham. (2021-02-08)

Dementia-related psychosis: GSA experts identify ways to improve care
A new white paper from The Gerontological Society of America (GSA) highlights the variety of challenges that persons with dementia-related psychosis and their caregivers have encountered during moves through different health care settings -- and proposes strategies to address these challenges. (2021-02-04)

High insulin levels during childhood a risk for mental health problems in adulthood, study suggests
Researchers have shown that the link between physical and mental illness is closer than previously thought. Certain changes in physical health, which are detectable in childhood, are linked with the development of mental illness in adulthood. (2021-01-13)

Scientists identify workflow algorithm to predict psychosis
Cleverly combining artificial and human intelligence leads to improved prevention of psychosis in young patients (2021-01-09)

Potential means of improving learning and memory in people with mental illnesses
More than a dozen drugs are known to treat symptoms such as hallucinations, erratic behaviors, disordered thinking and emotional extremes associated with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and other severe mental illnesses. But, drug treatments specifically able to target the learning, memory and concentration problems that may accompany such disorders remain elusive. (2020-12-03)

Psychosis symptoms linked to impaired information spread in the brain
Altered white matter limits the brain's conscious access to information, potentially contributing to delusions and other psychotic symptoms of mental health disorders, according to new research published in JNeurosci. (2020-11-23)

Study finds evidence of neurobiological mechanism for hallucinations and delusions
A new study from researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons has found evidence of a potential neurobiological mechanism for hallucinations and delusions that fits within the hierarchical model of psychosis and can explain their clinical presentation. (2020-11-09)

Study suggests increased risk of restraint use in black patients in the emergency setting
A study published in the most recent issue of Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) journal showed an increased risk of restraint use in Black patients compared with white patients in the emergency setting. The risk was not increased in other races or Hispanic/Latino ethnicity. (2020-11-02)

Unravelling the origins of autoimmune psychosis
Anti-NMDAR encephalitis is an autoimmune brain illness that is often mistaken by a psychiatric disorder since it causes psychoses and other behaviour alterations. Despite having these similarities, the illness does not respond to common antipsychotic treatments. (2020-10-29)

UBC research identifies gaps in helping youth diagnosed with early stages of psychosis
New UBC research is highlighting the need for improved training when it comes to helping young people living with psychosis determine their sense of identity. (2020-10-14)

Child neglect linked to teen pregnancy
Children who experience neglect are seven times more likely than other abuse victims to have a teen pregnancy say University of Queensland researchers. (2020-09-17)

With digital phenotyping, smartphones may play a role in assessing severe mental illness
Digital phenotyping approaches that collect and analyze Smartphone-user data on locations, activities, and even feelings - combined with machine learning to recognize patterns and make predictions from the data - have emerged as promising tools for monitoring patients with psychosis spectrum illnesses, according to a report in the September/October issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer. (2020-09-15)

Improved early psychosis detection system may halve risk in young people
Doctors have developed a new data mining method to detect many young people with emerging psychosis. The new methods, based on advanced data mining to pick up early risk sign from schools, hospitals, and general doctors, will be presented at the ECNP virtual congress, and is in press with a peer-reviewed journal. (2020-09-13)

Scientists use blood test to predict who is likely to develop psychotic disorders
Scientists have discovered that testing the levels of certain proteins in blood samples can predict whether a person at risk of psychosis is likely to develop a psychotic disorder years later. (2020-08-26)

One step closer to earlier diagnosis of bipolar disorder and psychoses
In a new study from the Danish psychiatry project iPSYCH, researchers have identified genetic risk factors for developing bipolar disorder and psychoses among people with depression. In the longer term, the results may contribute to ensuring the correct diagnosis is made earlier, so that the patients can receive the correct treatment as quickly as possible. (2020-08-25)

Future mental health care may include diagnosis via brain scan and computer algorithm
Most of modern medicine has physical tests or objective techniques to define much of what ails us. Yet, there is currently no blood or genetic test, or impartial procedure that can definitively diagnose a mental illness, and certainly none to distinguish between different psychiatric disorders with similar symptoms. Experts at the University of Tokyo are combining machine learning with brain imaging tools to redefine the standard for diagnosing mental illnesses. (2020-08-17)

Targeted treatment for depression could benefit patients with psychosis
Patients with early onset psychosis may benefit from treatment for depression, including with anti-depressants alongside other medication, new research shows. (2020-08-17)

Pimavanserin reduced symptoms of dementia-related psychosis in phase 3 trial
New data presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference indicates that pimavanserin leads to a robust reduction in the severity of psychosis symptoms during the 12 week open-label phase of the study, regardless of the underlying dementia subtype or the severity of participants' dementia. (2020-07-29)

Prescribed CBD could help people quit cannabis
A benchmark clinical trial published today shows that cannabidiol (CBD) could be a safe and effective treatment for problematic cannabis use. (2020-07-28)

How to strengthen New Zealand's proposed cannabis legalization and control bill
In advance of a widely-watched national referendum vote to be held this September, two drug policy experts from Massey University have identified gaps and challenges in New Zealand's proposal for legalizing recreational cannabis. (2020-07-13)

Infant sleep problems can signal mental disorders in adolescents -- Study
Specific sleep problems among babies and very young children can be linked to mental disorders in adolescents, a new study has found. (2020-07-01)

Unexpected mental illnesses found in a spectrum of a rare genetic disorder
UC Davis MIND Institute researchers found an unexpected spectrum of mental illnesses in patients with a rare gene mutation. These patients had a ''double hit'' condition that combined features and symptoms of fragile X syndrome and premutation disorder, in addition to a range of psychiatric symptoms. The findings revealed the need for clinicians to consider the complexities of the co-existing conditions of patients with both psychological and fragile X associated disorders. (2020-06-24)

Faulty brain processing of new information underlies psychotic delusions, finds new research
Problems in how the brain recognizes and processes novel information lie at the root of psychosis, researchers have found. Their discovery that defective brain signals in patients with psychosis could be altered with medication paves the way for new treatments for the disease. (2020-06-23)

Suicide rate for people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders 170 times higher
The suicide rate for people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSD) is 170 times higher than the general population according a study just published in the journal Schizophrenia Research, a figure the authors call 'tragically high.' (2020-06-18)

Young people with early psychosis may not require antipsychotic medications to recover
Researchers at Orygen have found that some young people with early stage first episode psychosis (FEP) can experience reduced symptoms and improve functioning without antipsychotic medication when they are provided with psychological interventions and comprehensive case management. (2020-06-17)

Researchers map out intricate processes that activate key brain molecule
For the first time, scientists have revealed the steps needed to turn on a receptor that helps regulate neuron firing. The findings might help researchers understand and someday treat addiction, psychosis and other neuropsychological diseases. (2020-06-17)

Viewing dopamine receptors in their native habitat
A new study led by UT Southwestern researchers reveals the structure of the active form of one type of dopamine receptor, known as D2, embedded in a phospholipid membrane. (2020-06-11)

Mental disorders in the family affects the treatment of people with bipolar disorder
Patients with bipolar disorder who have multiple family members with severe mental disorders, are more difficult to treat and require more medicine. But if they receive an intensive course of treatment, the effect of this is just as good as for patients who do not have a family history of severe mental disorders. (2020-06-11)

NMDA receptors may link psychosis and sleep deficits
Sofya Kulikova, a researcher at HSE University in Perm, is part of an international research team that has discovered potential mechanisms that explain the sleep spindle deficit in electroencephalograms (EEG) of people with schizophrenia. The article was published in the Schizophrenia Research on June 5. (2020-06-05)

Evidence suggests a small but important number of people will develop coronavirus-related psychosis
The review, published online ahead of print in Schizophrenia Research, found an increase in the prevalence of psychosis as a result of COVID-19 would likely be associated with viral exposure, pre-existing vulnerability and psychosocial stress. The review also suggested that people with psychosis may present a major challenge and potential infection control risk to clinical teams working with them. (2020-05-13)

Almost half of all postpartum psychosis are isolated cases
A new research result from iPSYCH shows that 40% of the women who suffer a psychosis after giving birth -- known as postpartum psychosis - do not subsequently become ill again. (2020-04-20)

In wake of COVID-19 pandemic, a crashing wave of neuropsychiatric problems?
Researchers suggest that in the aftermath of the novel coronavirus pandemic, a host of neuropsychiatric challenges may remain -- or emerge -- for those recovering from COVID-19 infections. (2020-04-14)

Thirty risk factors found during and after pregnancy for children developing psychosis
More than 30 significant risk factors have been identified for the development of psychotic disorders in offspring in research led by the NIHR Maudsley BRC. It is the first comprehensive meta-analysis of pre- and perinatal risk factors for psychosis in nearly 20 years. (2020-03-24)

A new window into psychosis
A recent study in mice led a team of researchers in Japan to believe that psychosis may be caused by problems with specialized nerve cells deep within the brain, as well as a certain kind of learning behavior. The researchers hope this could provide insight into the emergence of delusions in patients with psychosis or schizophrenia with the aim of finding ways to help them. (2020-03-18)

Inflammation in the brain linked to several forms of dementia
Inflammation in the brain may be more widely implicated in dementias than was previously thought, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge. The researchers say it offers hope for potential new treatments for several types of dementia. (2020-03-16)

Drug that keeps surface receptors on cancer cells makes them more visible to immune cells
A drug that is already clinically available for the treatment of nausea and psychosis, called prochlorperazine (PCZ), inhibits the internalization of receptors on the surface of tumor cells, thereby increasing the ability of anticancer antibodies to bind to the receptors and mount more effective immune responses. The work appears March 5 in the journal Cell. (2020-03-05)

Anti-psychotic medication linked to adverse change in brain structure
In a first-of-its-kind study using advanced brain imaging techniques, a commonly used anti-psychotic medication was associated with potentially adverse changes in brain structure. This study was the first in humans to evaluate the effects of this type of medication on the brain using a gold-standard design: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. The study could have an immediate impact on clinical practice. (2020-02-26)

Psychiatry: Five clearly defined patterns
Psychiatrists led by Nikolaos Koutsouleris from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have used a computer-based approach to assign psychotic patients diagnosed as bipolar or schizophrenic to five different subgroups. The method could lead to better therapies for psychoses. (2020-02-25)

Engaging with schizophrenia -- experts argue for new approaches to treatment
A better understanding of the lived experience of people with schizophrenia would enable clinicians to help patients live with their condition, alongside treating symptoms with medication and psychotherapy, say experts at the University of Birmingham. (2020-02-24)

Researchers say extended antidepressant use creates physical dependence
Researchers explain symptoms associated with Antidepressant Discontinuation Syndrome and provide a schedule for tapering various classes of antidepressants. Patients who stop medication without tapering often experience flulike symptoms, insomnia, nausea, imbalance, sensory disturbances often described as electric shocks or 'brain zaps', and hyperarousal. (2020-02-20)

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