Current Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension News and Events

Current Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension News and Events, Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension News Articles.
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Periodontal disease increases risk of major cardiovascular events
People with periodontitis are at higher risk of experiencing major cardiovascular events, according to new research from Forsyth Institute and Harvard University scientists and colleagues. (2021-02-21)

South American lizard's blood pressure mechanism is more efficient at cool temperatures
The black and white tegu lizard, which depends on external environmental factors to regulate body temperature, can survive swings between 15 and 35 degrees Celsius in a single day while keeping blood pressure steady. (2021-02-18)

Low-income middle-aged African-American women with hypertension are likely to suffer from depression
Low-income middle-aged African-American women with high blood pressure very commonly suffer from depression and should be better screened for this serious mental health condition. (2021-02-11)

Can current smartphone technology tell you when a pandemic might come calling?
UC San Diego researchers find that an optical tool already embedded in many smartphones can accurately diagnose blood-oxygen levels and help monitor respiratory disease in patients, particularly when they are quarantined at home. (2021-02-09)

Arizona economic burden of valley fever totals $736 million
Expenses for the fungal disease endemic to the Southwest can skyrocket for people whose diagnosis is delayed, leading to more serious infection or death. (2021-02-09)

Higher blood pressure at night than in daytime may increase Alzheimer's disease risk
Higher blood pressure at night than in daytime may be a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease in older men. This is suggested by a new study from researchers at Uppsala University, now published in the journal Hypertension. (2021-02-08)

Electronic health records can be valuable predictor of those likeliest to die from COVID
A study by Massachusetts General Hospital identifies key predictors of COVID-19 mortality among different age groups from patient longitudinal medical records. Predictive analytics based on electronic health records could prove valuable in allocating and distributing limited resources in the time of a pandemic. (2021-02-04)

Study reveals how air pollution may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease
A new study has found a link between high levels of air pollution at an individual's home address and an elevated risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Air pollution exposure appears to heighten the production of inflammatory cells in the bone marrow, triggering inflammation of the arteries. (2021-02-04)

CU offers plan for improving mental health care for resident physicians
A pilot program to offer mental health services offered resident physicians at the University of Colorado School of Medicine provides a model for confidential and affordable help, according to an article published today by the journal Academic Medicine. (2021-02-04)

Women who develop high blood pressure after birth at greater risk of chronic hypertension
In a new study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's (SMFM) annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting™, researchers from the University of Pittsburgh will unveil findings that suggest that women who develop high blood pressure during pregnancy and who continue to have elevated blood pressure postpartum are at an increased risk for developing chronic hypertension. (2021-01-29)

Melatonin produced in the lungs prevents infection by novel coronavirus
The hormone acts as a barrier against SARS-CoV-2, blocking the expression of genes that encode proteins in cells serving as viral entry points, according to a study by researchers at the University of São Paulo. (2021-01-27)

The longevity gene mammalian Indy (mINDY) is involved in blood pressure regulation
Reduced expression of mINDY, which is known to extend life span in lower organisms and to prevent from diet induced obesity, fatty liver and insulin resistance in mice, has now been shown to lower blood pressure and heart rate in rodents. (2021-01-26)

Hypertension symptoms in women often mistaken for menopause
Pregnancy complications and early menopause increase women's future risk of heart disease. Cardiologists, gynaecologists and endocrinologists recommend how to help middle-aged women prevent later heart problems in a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) consensus document published today in European Heart Journal, a journal of the ESC. ''Physicians should intensify the detection of hypertension in middle-aged women,'' states the document. (2021-01-26)

Brain pressure disorder that causes headache, vision problems on rise
A new study has found a brain pressure disorder called idiopathic intracranial hypertension is on the rise, and the increase corresponds with rising obesity rates. The study is published in the January 20, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that for women, socioeconomic factors like income, education and housing may play a role in their risk. (2021-01-20)

Inflammation caused by scorpion venom should be blocked immediately, study shows
In an article published in Nature Communications, Brazilian researchers show for the first time that in severe cases of scorpion envenomation it is the neuroimmune reaction triggered by the venom that leads to death. (2021-01-20)

Stretching more effective than walking to lower high blood pressure: USask study
A new University of Saskatchewan (USask) study has found that stretching is superior to brisk walking for reducing blood pressure in people with high blood pressure or who are at risk of developing elevated blood pressure levels. (2021-01-14)

CU Anschutz scientists reverse deadly impacts of asthma in mice
Excess mucus in the lungs can be fatal for asthma patients, but scientists at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have broken up those secretions at the molecular level and reversed their often deadly impacts. (2021-01-13)

Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B volume 10, issue 12 publishes
Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B Volume 10, Issue 12 Publishes The Journal of the Institute of Materia Medica, the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association, Acta Pharmaceutica Sinica B (APSB) is a monthly journal, in English, which publishes significant original research articles, rapid communications and high quality reviews of recent advances in all areas of pharmaceutical sciences -- including pharmacology, pharmaceutics, medicinal chemistry, natural products, pharmacognosy, pharmaceutical analysis and pharmacokinetics. (2021-01-11)

A CNIO study links severe COVID-19 disease to short telomeres
The data show that telomeres are shorter in patients suffering more severe COVID-19 pathologies. The researchers propose that one of the consequences of the viral infection is shortening of the telomeres, which, in turn, hampers the regeneration of lung tissue and causes prolonged sequelae in some patients. The study, published in the journal 'Aging', suggests the usefulness of a possible therapy for patients with post-COVID pulmonary injury based on activation of the enzyme telomerase. (2021-01-11)

An augmented immune response explains the adverse course of COVID-19 in patients with hypertension
COVID-19 patients who also suffer from high blood pressure are more likely to fall severely ill with the disease, which also leaves them at greater risk of death. Scientists from the Berlin Institute of Health (BIH) and Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, in collaboration with partners in Heidelberg and Leipzig, have now found that the immune cells of patients with hypertension are already pre-activated, and that this pre-activation is greatly enhanced under COVID-19. (2021-01-11)

Why COVID-19 pneumonia lasts longer, causes more damage than typical pneumonia
COVID pneumonia is significantly different from pneumonia caused by other causes, reports a new study in Nature. It shows how hijacks the lungs' own immune cells and uses them to spread across the lung over weeks. The infection leaves damage in its wake and fuels the fever, low blood pressure and damage to the kidneys, brain, heart and other organs in patients with COVID-19. Scientists discovered a target for treating COVID pneumonia and a clinical trial is underway at Northwestern. (2021-01-11)

An explanation for the lack of blood oxygenation detected in many COVID-19 patients
Researchers at the Seville Institute of Biomedicine (IBIS) describe the presence in the human carotid body, the organ that senses oxygen in the blood, of the protein (ECA2) through which SARS-CoV-2 infects cells. (2020-12-29)

Despite recommendations, patients with treatment-resistant hypertension rarely tested for primary al
A retrospective cohort study found that testing for primary aldosteronism in patients with treatment-resistent hypertension was rare and also associated with higher rates of evidence-based treatment and better longitudinal blood pressure control. The findings are published in Annals of Internal Medicine. (2020-12-28)

Visible hydrogels for rapid hemorrhage control and monitoring
A collaborative team of clinical intervention radiology specialist and bioengineering researchers create a visual hydrogel for rapid hemorrhage control and monitoring by adding imaging particles made from tantalum hydrogel mixture. (2020-12-22)

Increased meat consumption associated with symptoms of childhood asthma
Substances present in cooked meats are associated with increased wheezing in children, Mount Sinai researchers report. (2020-12-22)

Difference in blood pressure between arms linked to greater death risk
Robust evidence from a large international study confirms that a difference in blood pressure readings between arms is linked to greater risk of heart attack, stroke and death. (2020-12-21)

Pneumolysis: High altitude specialists explain lung destruction caused by COVID-19
According to the scientific paper, COVID-19's hypoxemia (low oxygen tension in the blood) can hardly be handled by ventilators and should not be considered as pneumonia or treated as a SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome). (2020-12-21)

New study identifies greatest risk factors of mortality from COVID-19
Hospitalized COVID-19 patients have a greater risk of dying if they are men or are obese or have complications from diabetes or hypertension, according to a new study conducted by University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) researchers. In a study published in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases, the researchers evaluated nearly 67,000 hospitalized COVID-19 patients in 613 hospitals across the country to determine link between common patient characteristics and the risk of dying from COVID-19. (2020-12-18)

Some neurons target tiny cerebral blood vessel dilation
Neurons control blood flow in tiny vessels in the brain, but researchers know little about this relationship. Now a team of Penn State engineers has found a connection between nitric oxide expressing neurons and changes in arterial diameters in mice, which may shed light on brain function and aging. (2020-12-16)

A first-in-human clinical trial shows microbubbles augments radiation in liver cancer patients
Bursting gas-filled microbubbles using ultrasound waves sensitizes tumors to targeted radiation, reducing tumor growth and improving overall survival after treatment. (2020-12-15)

Fighting hypertension through electrical impulses
Electrical impulses applied to a particular branch of the vagus nerve could be used in the future to reduce complications of arterial hypertension. These are the results of a research conducted, on animal models, by the Department of Angiocardioneurology and Translational Medicine of the I.R.C.C.S. Neuromed, in Italy, and published in the scientific journal Cell Reports. (2020-12-15)

Drug for pulmonary hypertension may become an option against cancer
In experiments by Brazilian researchers with mice and tumor cell lines, the drug showed potential to combat metastasis. The scientists are planning to conduct clinical trials with patients who are on chemotherapy. (2020-12-15)

Physicians say non-contact infrared thermometers fall short as COVID-19 screeners
While a fever is one of the most common symptoms for people who get sick with COVID-19, taking one's temperature is a poor means of screening who is infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes the disease, and more importantly, who might be contagious. (2020-12-15)

High blood pressure at any age, no matter how long you have it, may speed cognitive decline
Memory, concentration and other cognitive functions decline faster among middle-aged and older adults who have high blood pressure than those who do not. Even seemingly slight blood pressure elevation during middle and older age is linked to a faster decline in cognition. (2020-12-14)

The un-appeal of banana: liquid e-cigarette flavorings measurably injure lungs
UC San Diego researchers report chemicals used for flavor in e-cigarette liquid negatively affect specialized proteins that support immune system. (2020-12-14)

Low blood pressure during hemodialysis may indicate peripheral vascular disease
Using a large nationwide registry of patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis, this study published in the American Journal of Kidney Diseases found that higher frequency of low blood pressure episodes during hemodialysis was associated with a higher incidence of diagnosed peripheral arterial disease. (2020-12-11)

Beta-blockers display anti-inflammatory effects in advanced liver disease
Beta-blockers are used to prevent internal bleeding in patients with liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension. Researchers from MedUni Vienna have now shown that Beta-blockers also have beneficial effects on systemic inflammation and this translates into improved clinical outcomes. (2020-12-10)

Obstructive sleep apnoea puts a strain on the heart, too
Longer nocturnal respiratory events in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) cause higher immediate heart rate variability, and greater changes in beat-to-beat intervals are associated with reduced daytime alertness, according to new research from the University of Eastern Finland. (2020-12-10)

Inhaled vaccine induces fast, strong immune response in mice and non-human primates
Researchers demonstrate in a study publishing December 10 in the journal Med that a phage-based inhalation delivery system for vaccines generates potent antibody responses in mice and non-human primates, without causing lung damage. The findings suggest that a safe and effective lung delivery system could one day be used for vaccines and therapeutics against respiratory diseases. (2020-12-10)

A new way to make arteries
In the study, published in Nature, the authors propose that selective blockade of cell proliferation and metabolism could be used to enhance arterialization in patients with cardiovascular disease. (2020-12-09)

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