Current Punishment News and Events

Current Punishment News and Events, Punishment News Articles.
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Neural roots/origins of alcoholism identified by British and Chinese researchers
The physical origin of alcohol addiction has been located in a network of the human brain that regulates our response to danger, according to a team of British and Chinese researchers, co-led by the University of Warwick, the University of Cambridge, and Fudan University in Shanghai. (2021-02-08)

Explaining to your child why behavior is wrong may not always work
Parents know the scenario all too well: their child misbehaves and it comes time for discipline. (2021-01-29)

Do children view punishment as rehabilitative? A new study takes a look
The United States incarcerates more residents than any other country, however there is limited research that examines how people view such punishment, and whether views about punishment change with development. Researchers examined this in two studies exploring children's and adults' views about the impact of punishment on perceived moral character. (2021-01-19)

Sexual harassment claims considered more credible if made by 'prototypical' women
A new UW-led study reveals people's perceptions that sexual harassment primarily affects young, feminine and conventionally attractive women. Women who fall outside that prototype not only are perceived as unharmed by harassment, but also have a harder time convincing others that they have been harassed. (2021-01-14)

COVID-19: what strategies are beneficial to the state
Based on the classic Prisoner's Dilemma, HSE researchers modeled human behavior strategies in the face of COVID restrictions. Their model showed that unequal access to medical care both contributes to irresponsible behavior in some citizens and the independent acceptance of restrictions by others, without any government intervention. The study was published in the journal Public Administration Issues. (2020-12-18)

Restorative justice preferred among the Enga in Papua New Guinea
Most large-scale populations employ a punitive judicial system. Advocates have long called for a more restorative justice system that repairs harm to victims and reintegrates wrongdoers into society. A study analyzing 10 years of court cases of the Enga of Papua New Guinea show that they overwhelmingly emphasize restorative justice, allowing both sides and community members share their story, the community assists paying compensation to the victim, and supports reintegrating the offender back into society. (2020-12-10)

Children more willing to punish if the wrongdoer is 'taught a lesson'
Many children are willing to make personal sacrifices to punish wrongdoers -- and even more so if they believe punishment will teach the transgressor a lesson, a new Yale study published Nov. 23, 2020 in the journal Nature Human Behaviour shows. (2020-11-23)

States unfairly burdening incarcerated people with 'pay-to-stay' fees
Pay-to-stay, the practice of charging people to pay for their own jail or prison confinement, is being enforced unfairly by using criminal, civil and administrative law, according to a new Rutgers University-New Brunswick led study. (2020-11-20)

Tradition of petrified birds in the Dome of the Rock
The legend of Solomon and the birds associated with the Dome of the Rock was developed over time. Stories about the two birds demonstrate that Sufi traditions and the figure of Solomon were still very influential in shaping the appearance and conception of the Dome of the Rock. (2020-10-20)

Black police officers disciplined disproportionately for misconduct, IU research finds
An examination of racial differences in the disciplining of police officers in three of the largest U.S. cities consistently found that Black officers were more frequently disciplined for misconduct than White officers, despite an essentially equal number of allegations being leveled. This included allegations of severe misconduct. (2020-10-12)

In New York City, behavioral "nudges" improve court attendance
Improving communication around and awareness of critical court information through behavioral interventions, or ''nudges,'' may be more effective at improving court attendance for low-level criminal offenses than threats of further punishment, a new study finds. (2020-10-08)

ideas42 and University of Chicago Crime Lab challenge assumptions about missed court dates
Behavioral design nonprofit ideas42 and the University of Chicago Crime Lab announced the publication of their new joint paper, Using Behavioral Nudges to Reduce Failure to Appear in Court in Science Magazine. The paper's results demonstrate that redesigning New York City's summons form to make it simpler and clearer reduced failure to appear rates by 13%, and sending text message reminders reduced failure to appear rates by 21%. (2020-10-08)

Teacher stress linked with higher risk of student suspensions, MU researcher finds
Just how stressed are teachers? A recent Gallup poll found teachers are tied with nurses for the most stressful occupation in America today. Unfortunately, that stress can have a trickle-down effect on their students, leading to disruptive behavior that results in student suspensions. (2020-09-15)

Reward and punishment take similar paths in the mouse brain
One brain pathway, originating from the striosome, regulates the motivations that influence behavior. Previously, this part of the brain was thought to support reward-seeking and positive reinforcement for learning. The discovery that some neurons in this pathway contribute instead to negative-reinforcement learning reveals the striosome to be a complex motivation-processing hub. Motivation processing is impaired in people with certain mental illnesses. (2020-09-15)

Tel Aviv University study sheds light on brain mechanism activated by uncertainty
A new Tel Aviv University study examined the brain's reactions in conditions of uncertainty and stressful conflict in an environment of risks and opportunities. The researchers identified the areas of the brain responsible for the delicate balance between desiring gain and avoiding loss along the way. (2020-09-01)

Punitive sentencing led to higher incarceration rates throughout adulthood for certain birth cohorts in North Carolina
A new study using 45 years of incarceration data from North Carolina suggests an alternative explanation to the current rates of incarceration: this pattern is driven by the prolonged involvement in the criminal justice system by members of Generation X, who came of age during the 1980s and early 1990s. (2020-08-24)

'Selfish and loveless' society in Uganda really is not
A mountain people in Uganda -- branded as selfish and loveless by an renowned anthropologist half a century ago -- really is not, according to a study led by a Baylor University anthropologist. (2020-07-27)

Simulating cooperation in local communities
In new research published in EPJ B, a new simulation-based approach is introduced which could help to reduce the proportion of people who misuse welfare payoffs, through a cost-effective system which rewards individuals who use them responsibly. (2020-06-18)

Investors punish for social irresponsibility depending on proportion of company execs with law degrees
The extent to which investors punish firms for corporate social irresponsibility is associated with the proportion of top management executives in a firm who have a law degree, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame. (2020-04-30)

Research highlights racism concerns in schools and the community
Researchers from Staffordshire University are calling for more government funding to crack down on race-hate in schools and the wider community. (2020-04-22)

Older children's brains respond differently to rewarding vs. negative experiences late in day
Older children respond more strongly to rewarding experiences and less strongly to negative experiences later in the day, which may lead to poor decision-making at night, according to research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2020-03-11)

Our brains are powerful -- but secretive -- forecasters of video virality
Our brains can predict the popularity of online videos, without us even knowing it. (2020-03-09)

New study offers clues to origin of laws
The study found that despite living in separate countries and legal codes separated by thousands of years, people have a universal intuition about whether a punishment fits a crime. (2020-02-24)

Wall Street investors react to climate change
Institutional investors are factoring climate risks into their investment decisions, according to a first-ever survey conducted by the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin. (2020-02-18)

In court, far-reaching psychology tests are unquestioned
Psychological tests are important instruments used in courts to aid legal decisions that profoundly affect people's lives. While increasingly used in courts, new research shows the tests are not all scientifically valid, and once introduced into a case they are rarely challenged, according to Tess Neal, an assistant professor of psychology at Arizona State University. (2020-02-15)

Revenge is more enjoyable than forgiveness -- at least in stories
When it comes to entertainment, people enjoy seeing bad guys get their punishment more than seeing them be forgiven, a new study reveals. But even though they don't enjoy the forgiveness stories as much, people do find these narratives more meaningful and thought-provoking than ones in which the bad guys receive their just deserts. (2020-02-11)

How the brain balances pleasure and pain
The region of the brain called the ventral pallidum balances signals that either excite or inhibit neurons to influence the motivation of an animal to seek pleasure or avoid pain. An imbalance skews positive vs. negative motivation and may explain behaviors associated with psychiatric disorders like depression or anxiety. (2019-12-31)

How the brain decides to punish or not
Oksana Zinchenko, Research Fellow at the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, HSE University, has conducted meta-analysis of 17 articles to find out which areas of the brain are involved decision-making for rendering social punishment. It would appear that in case of both victims of violations as well as witnesses, punishment decisions activate the brain regions responsible for focusing one's attention, processing information, and responding effectively to social interaction. The findings of the study were published in Scientific Reports. (2019-11-22)

Nearly half of accused harassers can return to work
What happens behind the scenes when employees are accused of harassment? New research from Michigan State University revealed that almost half of accused harassers can go back to work when disputes are settled by arbitrators -- or, third-parties who resolve disputes. (2019-11-14)

Chance, not ideology, drives political polarization
Michael Macy, Cornell University professor and director of the Social Dynamics Laboratory, published new research examining a phenomena called an 'opinion cascade' -- in which partisans pile onto whatever emerging position they identify with their party. (2019-08-28)

Neurological brain markers might detect risk for psychotic disorders
People who may hear and see things that are not there could have symptoms of psychosis, better known as psychotic disorders. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found neurological markers in the human brain that can be used to detect people at-risk for developing psychotic disorders and to understand when this risk has been successfully treated. (2019-08-27)

University of Michigan study indicates negative outcomes for Native American children who are spanked
Some people may believe that if you live in a community with different cultural values, spanking might not be harmful -- an assumption that does not appear to be correct, according to a new University of Michigan study. (2019-08-19)

Individuals are swayed by their peers, leading to more severe punishments, study finds
When acting as one part of a group charged with deciding how to punish someone -- a jury, for example -- individuals are swayed by their peers to punish more often than they would if deciding alone, a new study found. (2019-08-12)

Visible punishment institutions are key in promoting large-scale cooperation: Study
New international research by Monash University has found that one way to overcome social dilemmas is through visible prosocial punishment -- the existence of collective institutions that punish individuals who don't cooperate. (2019-07-26)

School psychologists develop intervention to reduce hallway disruptions
A gamelike intervention developed by school psychology researchers in UT's College of Education, Health, and Human Sciences may help reduce hallway disruptions among elementary school children. (2019-07-22)

Teacher treatment of students factors into racial gap in school suspensions
An analysis led by Brown sociologist Jayanti Owens found that different treatment of black and white students accounted for half of the racial gap in school suspensions and expulsions among 5- to 9-year-old children. (2019-07-19)

Marijuana use may not make parents more 'chill'
Sorry, marijuana moms and dads: Using pot may not make you a more relaxed parent, at least when it comes to how you discipline your children. A study of California parents found that current marijuana users administered more discipline techniques of all kinds to their children on average than did non-users. That includes everything from timeouts to, in some cases, physical abuse. (2019-07-17)

Over-conditioning kills: Non-traumatic fatalities in football is preventable
Most non-traumatic fatalities among high school and college football athletes do not occur while playing the game of football, but rather during conditioning sessions which are often associated with overexertion or punishment drills required by coaches and team staff, according to research presented today at the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine Annual Meeting. The research was presented by Dr. Barry P. Boden of The Orthopaedic Center, Rockville, Md. (2019-07-13)

Managing the risk of aggressive dog behavior
Aggressive behavior in pet dogs is a serious problem for dog owners across the world, with bite injuries representing a serious risk to both people and other dogs. New research by the University of Bristol has found that clinical animal behaviorists should focus on helping dog owners to feel confident in the effectiveness of the behavior modification techniques that they recommend and, in their ability, to actually use them successfully. (2019-06-17)

Young children willing to punish misbehavior, even at personal cost, new research shows
Children as young as three years old are willing to punish others' bad behavior, even at personal cost, finds a new study by psychology researchers. (2019-05-20)

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