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Current Quantum Computing News and Events, Quantum Computing News Articles.
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JILA's novel atomic clock design offers 'tweezer' control
JILA physicists have demonstrated a novel atomic clock design that combines near-continuous operation with strong signals and high stability, features not previously found together in a single type of next-generation atomic clock. The new clock, which uses laser 'tweezers' to trap, control and isolate the atoms, also offers unique possibilities for enhancing clock performance using the tricks of quantum physics. (2019-09-12)

Graphene sets the stage for the next generation of THz astronomy detectors
Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology have demonstrated a detector made from graphene that could revolutionize the sensors used in next-generation space telescopes. The findings were recently published in the scientific journal Nature Astronomy. (2019-09-11)

Conductivity at the edges of graphene bilayers
For nanoribbons of bilayer graphene, whose edge atoms are arranged in zigzag patterns, the bands of electron energies which are allowed and forbidden are significantly different to those found in monolayer graphene. This causes variations in the ways in which bilayers conduct electricity, according to research published in EPJ B. (2019-09-11)

From years to days: Artificial Intelligence speeds up photodynamics simulations
The prediction of molecular reactions triggered by light is to date extremely time-consuming and therefore costly. A team led by Philipp Marquetand from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna has now presented a method using artificial neural networks that drastically accelerates the simulation of light-induced processes. The method provides new possibilities for a better understanding of biological processes such as the first steps of carcinogenesis or ageing processes of matter. (2019-09-11)

Sum of three cubes for 42 finally solved -- using real life planetary computer
Hot on the heels of the ground-breaking 'Sum-Of-Three-Cubes' solution for the number 33, a team led by the University of Bristol and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has solved the final piece of the famous 65-year-old maths puzzle with an answer for the most elusive number of all - 42. (2019-09-06)

Scientists couple magnetization to superconductivity for quantum discoveries
In a recent study, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory have created a miniaturized chip-based superconducting circuit that couples quantum waves of magnetic spins called magnons to photons of equivalent energy. (2019-09-06)

Exotic physics phenomenon is observed for first time
The Aharonov-Bohm Effect, an exotic physical phenomenon, has been directly observed for the first time, following decades of attempts. The finding, by MIT researchers and others, could lead to topological phases, and eventually to fault-tolerant quantum computers. (2019-09-05)

Future of LEDs Gets Boost from Verification of Localization States in InGaN Quantum Wells
LEDs made of indium gallium nitride provide better luminescence efficiency than many of the other materials used to create blue and green LEDs, but a big challenge of working with InGaN is its known dislocation density defects that make it difficult to understand its emission properties. Researchers report an InGaN LED structure with high luminescence efficiency and what is believed to be the first direct observation of transition carriers between different localization states within InGaN. (2019-09-04)

Seeking moments of disorder
Scientists discover a new, long-hypothesized material state with a signature of quantum disordered liquid-like magnetic moments. (2019-09-04)

Spreading light over quantum computers
Scientists at Linköping University have shown how a quantum computer really works and have managed to simulate quantum computer properties in a classical computer. 'Our results should be highly significant in determining how to build quantum computers', says Professor Jan-Åke Larsson. (2019-09-03)

A new alphabet to write and read quantum messages with very fast particles
Quantum information relies on the possibility of writing messages in a quantum particle and reading them out in a reliable way. If, however, the particle is relativistic, meaning that it moves with velocities close to the speed of light, it is impossible for standard techniques to unambiguously decode the message and the communication fails. Thanks to a new method to write and read the message researchers guarantee the reliable decoding of quantum messages which are transmitted extremely fast. (2019-09-03)

At the edge of chaos, powerful new electronics could be created
A phenomenon that is well known from chaos theory was observed in a material for the first time ever, by scientists from the University of Groningen. A structural transition in the ferroelastic material barium titanate, caused by an increase or decrease in temperature, resembles the periodic doubling seen in non-linear dynamical systems. This 'spatial chaos' in a material was first predicted in 1985 and could be used in applications such as adaptable neuromorphic electronics. (2019-09-03)

Using lasers to study explosions
An explosion is a complex event involving quickly changing temperatures, pressures and chemical concentrations. A special type of infrared laser, known as a swept-wavelength external cavity quantum cascade laser, can be used to study explosions. This versatile instrument has a broad wavelength tuning range that allows the measurement of multiple chemical substances in an explosive fireball. The ability to measure and monitor the dramatic changes during explosions could help scientists understand and even control them. (2019-09-03)

Breakthrough enables storage and release of mechanical waves without energy loss
A new discovery by researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center at The Graduate Center, CUNY could allow light and sound waves to be stored intact for an indefinite period of time and then direct it toward a desired location on demand. Such a development would greatly facilitate the ability to manipulate waves for a variety of desired uses, including energy harvesting, quantum computing, structural-integrity monitoring, information storage, and more. (2019-08-30)

Entanglement sent over 50 km of optical fiber
For the first time, a team led by Innsbruck physicist Ben Lanyon has sent a light particle entangled with matter over 50 km of optical fiber. This paves the way for the practical use of quantum networks and sets a milestone for a future quantum internet. (2019-08-29)

Break in temporal symmetry produces molecules that can encode information
Theoretical findings in a study performed by researchers with FAPESP's support and published in Scientific Reports could be exploited in the development of quantum computing. (2019-08-28)

New MRI computing technique can spot scar muscles of heart without damaging kidneys
3D MRI computing can measure strain in the heart using image registration method. Traditional method involves giving the patient a dose of gadolinium which can affect the kidney, researchers at WMG, University of Warwick have found. (2019-08-28)

Quantum criticality could be a boon for qubit designers
Physicists studying the strange behavior of metal alloys called heavy fermions have made a surprising discovery that could be useful in safeguarding the information stored in quantum bits, or qubits, the basic units of encoded information in quantum computers. (2019-08-26)

From crystals to glasses: a new unified theory for heat transport
Theoretical physicists from SISSA and the UCDavis lay brand new foundations to heat transport in materials, which finally allow crystals, polycrystalline solids, alloys, and glasses to be treated on the same solid footing. This feat opens the way to numerical simulation of thermal properties of a vast class of materials that are key in important technologies and even in the planetary sciences. The research has been published in Nature Communications. (2019-08-26)

Physicists mash quantum and gravity and find time, but not as we know it
A University of Queensland-led international team of researchers say they have discovered ''a new kind of quantum time order''. UQ physicist Dr Magdalena Zych said the discovery arose from an experiment the team designed to bring together elements of the two big - but contradictory - physics theories developed in the past century. (2019-08-25)

Detraction-free light-matter interaction
Certain semiconductor structures, so-called quantum dots, might constitute the foundation of quantum communication. They are an efficient interface between matter and light, with photons (light particles) emitted by the quantum dots transporting information across large distances. However, structures form by default during the manufacture of quantum dots that interfere with communication. (2019-08-23)

In a quantum future, which starship destroys the other?
Quantum mechanics boasts all sorts of strange features, one being quantum superposition -- the peculiar circumstance in which particles seem to be in two or more places or states at once. Now, an international group of physicists led by Stevens Institute of Technology flip that description on its head, showing that particles are not the only objects that can exist in a state of superposition -- so can time itself. (2019-08-22)

Cracking a decades-old test, researchers bolster case for quantum mechanics
At upcoming FiO + LS conference, researchers will discuss creative tactics to get rid of loopholes that have long confounded tests of quantum mechanics. With their innovative method, the researchers were able to demonstrate quantum interactions between two particles spaced more than 180 meters (590 feet) apart while eliminating the possibility that shared events during the past 11 years affected their interaction. (2019-08-22)

Living cells engineered to be computing and recording devices
Cells can be viewed as natural minicomputers that execute programs encoded in their DNA. In a paper appearing Aug. 22, 2019 in the journal Molecular Cell, MIT researchers describe a new technology that uses DNA for information processing and storage in living cells. (2019-08-22)

Quantum gravity's tangled time
The theories of quantum mechanics and gravity are notorious for being incompatible, despite the efforts of scores of physicists over the past fifty years. However, recently an international team of researchers led by physicists from the University of Vienna, the Austrian Academy of Sciences as well as the University of Queensland (AUS) and the Stevens Institute of Technology (USA) have combined the key elements of the two theories describing the flow of time and discovered that temporal order between events can exhibit genuine quantum features. (2019-08-22)

Switching electron properties on and off individually
Electrons have different properties - and they all can be used to create order in solid objects. This order determines the properties of the material. Experiments at the TU Vienna show: It is possible to influence different characteristics of the electrons separately from each other. Closely interwoven quantum phenomena can thus be understood individually. (2019-08-22)

Researchers get first microscopic look at a tiny phenomenon with big potential implications
Matter behaves differently when it's tiny. At the nanoscale, electric current cuts through mountains of particles, spinning them into vortexes that can be used intentionally in quantum computing. The particles arrange themselves into a topological map, but the lines blur as electrons merge into indistinguishable quasiparticles with shifting properties. The trick is learning how to control such changeable materials. (2019-08-22)

Studying quantum phenomena in magnetic systems to understand exotic states of matter
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech), Aoyama-Gakuin University, and J-PARC Center unify condensed matter physics and quantum physics by experimentally characterizing magnetism-related quantum phenomena in Ba2CoSi2O6Cl2. (2019-08-21)

Physicists create world's smallest engine
The research explains how random fluctuations affect the operation of microscopic machines like this tiny motor. In the future, such devices could be incorporated into other technologies to recycle waste heat and thus improve energy efficiency. (2019-08-21)

Scientists develop a metamaterial for applications in magnonics
Physicists from Russia and Europe have demonstrated the real possibility of using superconductor/ferromagnet systems to create magnonic crystals, which will be at the core of spin-wave devices to come in the post-silicon era of electronics. The paper was published in the journal Advanced Science. (2019-08-21)

Physicists use light flashes to discover, control new quantum states of matter
Jigang Wang and the members of his research group are developing new tools and techniques to access new states of matter hidden within superconducting and other complex materials. Harnessing these exotic states and their unique properties could lead to better computing, communicating and data storing technologies. Wang's research is supported by the US Army Research Office. (2019-08-20)

Machine learning models help clinicians identify people who need advanced depression care
Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University researchers have created decision models capable of predicting which patients might need more treatment for their depression than what their primary care provider can offer. The algorithms were specifically designed to provide information the clinician can act on and fit into existing clinical workflows. (2019-08-20)

Black hole holograms
Japanese researchers show how a holographic tabletop experiment can be used to simulate the physics of a black hole. This work may lead the way to a more complete theory of quantum gravity that harmonizes quantum mechanics and relativity. (2019-08-19)

Towards an 'orrery' for quantum gauge theory
Physicists at ETH Zurich have developed a new approach to couple quantized gauge fields to ultracold matter. The method might be the basis for a versatile platform to tackle problems ranging from condensed matter to high-energy physics. (2019-08-19)

Spinning lightwaves on a one-way street
Researchers at Purdue University have created a quantum spin wave for light. This can be a carrier of information for future nanotechnologies but with a unique twist: they only flow in one direction. (2019-08-19)

HKUST-PKU unveiled first quantum simulation of 3D topological matter with ultracold atoms
Physicists from HKUST and PKU have successfully created the world's first 3D simulation of topological matter consisting of ultracold atoms. (2019-08-19)

Two advances in understanding the role of 'charge stripes' in superconducting mate
In independent studies, two research teams report important advances in understanding how charge stripes might interact with superconductivity. Both studies were carried out with X-rays at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. (2019-08-16)

Researchers demonstrate three-dimensional quantum hall effect for the first time
The quantum Hall effect (QHE), which was previously known for two-dimensional (2D) systems, was predicted to be possible for three-dimensional (3D) systems by Bertrand Halperin in 1987, but the theory was not proven until recently by researchers from the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) and their research collaborators from around the globe. (2019-08-15)

Newfound superconductor material could be the 'silicon of quantum computers'
Newly discovered properties in the compound uranium ditelluride show that it could prove highly resistant to one of the nemeses of quantum computer development -- the difficulty with making such a computer's memory storage switches, called qubits, function long enough to finish a computation before losing the delicate physical relationship that allows them to operate as a group. This relationship, called quantum coherence, is hard to maintain because of disturbances from the surrounding world. (2019-08-15)

Regenstrief, IU scientists to present cutting-edge HIT expertise at world congress
Research scientists representing Regenstrief Institute, Indiana University School of Medicine and IU Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health at IUPUI are joining -- and in some cases leading -- the global health conversation at the 17th World Congress of Medical and Health Informatics (MedInfo). (2019-08-15)

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