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Tiny device enables new record in super-fast quantum light detection
Researchers from the University of Bristol's Quantum Engineering Technology Labs (QET Labs) and Université Côte d'Azur have made a new miniaturized light detector to measure quantum features of light in more detail than ever before. The device, made from two silicon chips working together, was used to measure the unique properties of ''squeezed'' quantum light at record high speeds. (2020-11-09)

A new candidate material for quantum spin liquids
Using a unique material, EPFL scientists have been able to design and study an unusual state of matter, the Quantum Spin Liquid. The work has significant implications for future technologies, from quantum computing to superconductivity and spintronics. (2020-11-06)

Investigating optical activity under an external magnetic field
A new study published in EPJ B by Chengping Yin, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Quantum Engineering and Quantum Materials, South China, aims to derive an analytical model of optical activity in black phosphorous under an external magnetic field. (2020-11-06)

Know when to unfold 'em: Applying particle physics methods to quantum computing
Borrowing a page from high-energy physics and astronomy textbooks, a team of physicists and computer scientists at Berkeley Lab has successfully adapted and applied a common error-reduction technique to the field of quantum computing. (2020-11-05)

3D print experts discover how to make tomorrow's technology using ink-jet printed graphene
The University of Nottingham has cracked the conundrum of how to use inks to 3D-print novel electronic devices with useful properties, such as an ability to convert light into electricity. (2020-11-04)

Luminescent wood could light up homes of the future
The right indoor lighting can help set the mood, from a soft romantic glow to bright, stimulating colors. But some materials used for lighting, such as plastics, are not eco-friendly. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have developed a bio-based, luminescent, water-resistant wood film that could someday be used as cover panels for lamps, displays and laser devices. (2020-11-04)

Building a quantum network one node at a time
University of Rochester and Cornell University researchers create 'optically active spin arrays' within a device that could serve as a node for exchanging photons with distant locations. (2020-11-04)

Researchers develop a high-power, portable terahertz laser
Researchers at MIT and the University of Waterloo have developed a high-power, portable version of a device called a quantum cascade laser, which can generate terahertz radiation outside of a laboratory setting. The laser could potentially be used in applications such as pinpointing skin cancer and detecting hidden explosives. (2020-11-02)

Devil in the defect detail of quantum emissions unravelled
Emerging quantum technologies require a means to transmit quantum information effectively requiring new ways to reliably encode, transmit and detect quantum properties on individual particles of light, or photons. An international collaboration, led by the University of Technology Sydney, investigating the chemical structure of crystal imperfections, or defects, in the nanomaterial hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) have definitively linked the defect structure to carbon impurities introduced into the hBN lattice. The discovery enables a better understanding of the properties of these quantum light sources. (2020-11-02)

A new spin on atoms gives scientists a closer look at quantum weirdness
A team of researchers has developed a new way to control and measure atoms that are so close together no optical lens can distinguish them. (2020-10-30)

Breakthrough quantum-dot transistors create a flexible alternative to conventional electronics
Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their collaborators from the University of California, Irvine have created fundamental electronic building blocks out of tiny structures known as quantum dots and used them to assemble functional logic circuits. (2020-10-29)

Weak equivalence principle violated in gravitational waves
New research published in EPJ C proves theoretically that the Weak Equivalence Principle can be violated by quantum particles in gravitational waves - the ripples in spacetime caused by colossal events such as merging black holes. (2020-10-28)

Direct observation of a single electron's butterfly-shaped distribution in titanium oxide
A research team led by Nagoya University has observed the smeared-out spatial distribution of a single valence electron at the centre of a titanium oxide molecule, using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and a new Fourier synthesis method also developed by the team. The method can determine the orbital states in materials regardless of their physical properties and without the need for difficult experiments or analytical techniques. The work was published recently in Physical Review Research. (2020-10-28)

Physicists circumvent centuries-old theory to cancel magnetic fields
A team of scientists including two physicists at the University of Sussex has found a way to circumvent a 178-year old theory which means they can effectively cancel magnetic fields at a distance. They are the first to be able to do so in a way which has practical benefits. (2020-10-28)

Researchers find direction decided by rate of coin flip in quantum world
Flip a coin. Heads? Take a step to the left. Tails? Take a step to the right. In the quantum world? Go in both directions at once, like a wave spreading out. Called the walker analogy, this random process can be applied in both classical and quantum algorithms used in state-of-the-art technologies such as artificial intelligence and data search processes. However, the randomness also makes the walk difficult to control, making it more difficult to precisely design systems. (2020-10-28)

Theoreticians show which quantum systems are suitable for quantum simulations
A joint research group led by Prof. Jens Eisert of Freie Universität Berlin and Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) has shown a way to simulate the quantum physical properties of complex solid state systems. This is done with the help of complex solid state systems that can be studied experimentally. The study was published in the renowned journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS). (2020-10-27)

On-surface synthesis of graphene nanoribbons could advance quantum devices
An international multi-institution team of scientists has synthesized graphene nanoribbons -- ultrathin strips of carbon atoms -- on a titanium dioxide surface using an atomically precise method that removes a barrier for custom-designed carbon nanostructures required for quantum information sciences. (2020-10-26)

Timekeeping theory combines quantum clocks and Einstein's relativity
Cool research story with connections to atomic clocks, Einstein and quantum mechanics. The research shows the 'spooky' interference that can impact even the most sophisticated clocks. (2020-10-23)

Time crystals lead researchers to future computational work
Time crystals sound like something out of science fiction, but they may be the next major leap in quantum network research. A team based in Japan has proposed a method to use time crystals to simulate massive networks with very little computing power. They published their results on October 16 Science Advances. (2020-10-23)

QCLs exhibit extreme pulses
Based on a quantum cascade laser (QCL) emitting mid-infrared light, the researchers developed a basic optical neuron system operating 10,000× faster than biological neurons. Their report is published in Advanced Photonics. (2020-10-23)

Optical wiring for large quantum computers
Researchers at ETH have demonstrated a new technique for carrying out sensitive quantum operations on atoms. In this technique, the control laser light is delivered directly inside a chip. This should make it possible to build large-scale quantum computers based on trapped atoms. (2020-10-22)

Researchers develop a simplified method to modify disease signaling with light
Cellular optogenetics is a technique that allows researchers to use light to precisely control cell signaling and function in space and time enabling the investigation of mechanisms involved in disease processes. A research team from the University of Turku have developed a novel way to make cellular optogenetic tools much easier to monitor and apply, and showed how they can be used to investigate the cellular side effects of medicines used to treat cancer. (2020-10-22)

HKU physicist joins international effort to unveil the behavior of "strange metals"
An international joint research team including Dr Zi Yang MENG, Associate Professor of Department of Physics at the University of Hong Kong (HKU), has solved the puzzle of the NFL behaviour in interacting electrons systems, and provided a protocol for the establishment of new paradigms in quantum metals, through quantum many-body computation and analytical calculations. The findings have recently been published in Npj Quantum Materials. (2020-10-19)

Microscopy beyond the resolution limit
The Polish-Israeli team from the Faculty of Physics of the University of Warsaw and the Weizmann Institute of Science has made another significant achievement in fluorescent microscopy. In the pages of the Optica journal the team presented a new method of microscopy which, in theory, has no resolution limit. In practice, the team managed to demonstrate a fourfold improvement over the diffraction limit. (2020-10-19)

Researchers discover a uniquely quantum effect in erasing information
Researchers from Trinity College Dublin have discovered a uniquely quantum effect in erasing information that may have significant implications for the design of quantum computing chips. Their surprising discovery brings back to life the paradoxical ''Maxwell's demon'', which has tormented physicists for over 150 years, (2020-10-16)

Slowing light in an optical cavity with mechanical resonators and mirrors
Kamran Ullah from Pakistan and Hameed Ullah from Porto Alegre, Brazil have demonstrated the theory behind how a cavity optomechanical system induces OMIT and reduces the speed of light, in a paper in EPJ D entitled 'Enhanced optomechanically induced transparency and slow/fast light in a position-dependent mass optomechanics' (2020-10-16)

uOttawa researchers find cheaper, faster way to measure the electric field of light
Researchers at the University of Ottawa have created a new method to measure the temporal evolution of electric fields with optical frequencies. The new approach, which works in ambient air, facilitates the direct measurement of the field waveform and could lead to breakthroughs in high-speed electronics. (2020-10-16)

'Classified knots': uOttawa researchers create optical framed knots to encode information
In a world first, researchers from the University of Ottawa in collaboration with Israeli scientists have been able to create optical framed knots in the laboratory that could potentially be applied in modern technologies. Their work opens the door to new methods of distributing secret cryptographic keys - used to encrypt and decrypt data, ensure secure communication and protect private information. (2020-10-16)

Scientists propose potential method for imaging-guided synergistic cancer therapy
A joint research team led by Prof. WANG Hui and Prof. LIN Wenchu from the High Magnetic Field Laboratory of the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science developed a synthesis of metal-free multifunctional therapeutic reagents, called graphitic carbon nitride quantum dots embedded in carbon nanosheets (CNQD-CN), via a one-step hydrothermal treatment. (2020-10-15)

Bringing a power tool from math into quantum computing
The Fourier transform is a mathematical operation essential to virtually all fields of physics and engineering. Although there already exists an algorithm that computes the Fourier transform in quantum computers, it is not versatile enough for many practical applications. In a recent study, scientists from Tokyo University of Science tackle this problem by designing a novel quantum circuit that calculates the Fourier transform in a much quicker, versatile, and more efficient way. (2020-10-14)

What laser color do you like?
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the University of Maryland have developed a microchip technology that can convert invisible near-infrared laser light into any one of a panoply of visible laser colors, including red, orange, yellow and green. Their work provides a new approach to generating laser light on integrated microchips. (2020-10-14)

When Fock meets Landau: Topology in atom-photon interactions
Topological photonics concerns the classical wave simulation of electronic band topology. Does the quantum nature of light embed new topological states? By exploiting the similarity between the Jaynes-Cummings model and graphene, topological states of quantized light were found with a wealth of physics involving the valley Hall effect, the Haldane model and the Lifshitz topological transition. This research built a bridge between quantum electrodynamics and topological phases in condensed matter physics. (2020-10-14)

Quantum physics: Physicists successfully carry out controlled transport of stored light
A team of physicists at Mainz University has successfully transported light stored in a quantum memory over a distance of 1.2 millimeters. They have demonstrated that the controlled transport process and its dynamics has only little impact on the properties of the stored light. The researchers used ultra-cold rubidium-87 atoms as a storage medium for the light as to achieve a high level of storage efficiency and a long lifetime. (2020-10-13)

Temperature evolution of impurities in a quantum gas
A new, Monash-led theoretical study advances our understanding of the role of thermodynamics in the 'quantum impurity' problem, which studies the behaviour of deliberately introduced atoms (ie, 'impurities') that behave as particularly 'clean' quasiparticles within a background atomic gas, allowing a controllable 'perfect test bed' study of quantum correlations. (2020-10-13)

Scientists report role for dopamine and serotonin in human perception and decision-making
Scientists at Wake Forest School of Medicine have recorded real time changes in dopamine and serotonin levels in the human brain that are involved with perception and decision-making. These same neurochemicals also are critical to movement disorders and psychiatric conditions, including substance abuse and depression. (2020-10-12)

Stacking and twisting graphene unlocks a rare form of magnetism
A team of researchers at Columbia University and the University of Washington has discovered that a variety of exotic electronic states, including a rare form of magnetism, can arise in a three-layer graphene structure. (2020-10-12)

Finding the right colour to control magnets with laser pulses
Scientists have discovered a new way to manipulate magnets with laser light pulses shorter than a trillionth of a second. The international team of researchers, led by Lancaster and Radboud Universities, also identified the light wavelength or colour which enables the most efficient manipulation. The finding is published in Physical Review Letters. (2020-10-12)

Penn engineers create helical topological exciton-polaritons
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Engineering and Applied Science are the first to create an even more exotic form of the exciton-polariton, one which has a defined quantum spin that is locked to its direction of motion. Depending on the direction of their spin, these helical topological exciton-polaritons move in opposite directions along the surface of an equally specialized type of topological insulator. (2020-10-12)

A new interpretation of quantum mechanics suggests reality does not depend on the measurer
For 100 years scientists have disagreed on how to interpret quantum mechanics. A recent study by Jussi Lindgren and Jukka Liukkonen supports an interpretation that is close to classical scientific principles. (2020-10-08)

An electrical trigger fires single, identical photons
Researchers at Berkeley Lab have found a way to generate single, identical photons on demand. The precisely controlled photon source, made from an atomically thin semiconducting material, could aid the development of advanced quantum communication. (2020-10-08)

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