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Current Quantum Dots News and Events, Quantum Dots News Articles.
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UC Riverside physicists create exotic electron liquid
By bombarding an ultrathin semiconductor sandwich with powerful laser pulses, physicists at the University of California, Riverside, have created the first 'electron liquid' at room temperature. The achievement opens a pathway for development of the first practical and efficient devices to generate and detect light at terahertz wavelengths -- between infrared light and microwaves. Such devices could be used in applications as diverse as communications in outer space, cancer detection, and scanning for concealed weapons. (2019-02-04)

Argonne researchers develop new method to reduce quantum noise
New method for alleviating the effects of ''noise'' in quantum information systems addresses a challenge that scientists around the globe are working to meet in the race toward a new era of quantum technologies. (2019-02-04)

Current generation via quantum proton transfer
NIMS and Hokkaido University jointly discovered that proton transfer in electrochemical reactions is governed by the quantum tunneling effect (QTE) under the specific conditions. In addition, they made a first ever observation of the transition between the quantum and classical regimes in electrochemical proton transfer by controlling potential. These results may advance basic research leading to the development of highly efficient electrochemical energy conversion systems based on quantum mechanics. (2019-02-01)

Breaching the horizons: Universal spreading laws confirmed
By extending the computational horizons from one day to the unprecedented time scales, the IBS researchers were able to confirm that a cloud of quantum particles continue to spread even when particle to particle interactions originally deemed to be the activator of the spreading, exert almost no strength. Their findings are published online in Jan. 30, 2019, in Physical Review Letters. (2019-02-01)

Faster than allowed by quantum computing?
Quantum computers are more powerful than classical computers since they work with coherent ''quantum bits'' instead of ordinary zeroes and ones. But could there be even more efficient ''science fiction computers''? Researchers from the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the University of Vienna have now shown that this is not possible. (2019-02-01)

Supercomputing helps study two-dimensional materials
Computational scientists support experimentalist's quest to observe lithium atoms' behaviour when placed between two sheets of graphene. (2019-02-01)

Effectively collecting tiny droplets for biomedical analysis and beyond
In a single sneeze or a cough, as many as 40,000 tiny droplets are forcibly propelled from our mouth and nose into the air. While we cannot control our sneezing, researchers from City University of Hong Kong's (CityU) have recently developed an original method to collect micro-droplets, such as these precious human dewdrops, which may shed light on applications in detecting disease-causing bacteria and preventing the spread of disease. (2019-01-31)

Quantum sensors providing magnetic resonance with unprecedented sensitivity
A piece of work involving international collaboration and the participation of the Quantum Technologies for Information Science (QUTIS) group of the UPV/EHU's Department of Physical Chemistry, has produced a series of protocols for quantum sensors that could allow images to be obtained by means of the nuclear magnetic resonance of single biomolecules using a minimal amount of radiation. The results of the research have been published in the prestigious interdisciplinary physics journal Physical Review Letters. (2019-01-31)

Graphene quantum dots sensitized C-ZnO nanotaper photoanodes for solar cells application
In a paper to be published in the forthcoming issue in NANO, researchers from the National Institute of Technology, India, have synthesized blue-green-orange photoemissive sulfur and nitrogen co-doped graphene quantum dots (SNGQDs) using hydrothermal method. These GQDs showed strong UV-visible photoabsorption and excitation dependent photoemission which have low-cost, eco-friendly solar cell application. (2019-01-30)

How does a quantum particle see the world?
Researchers at the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences proved that whether an object (in our example, the ball) shows quantum features depends on the reference frame. The physical laws, however, are still independent of it. The results are published in Nature Communications. (2019-01-30)

New quantum system could help design better spintronics
Researchers have created a new testing ground for quantum systems in which they can literally turn certain particle interactions on and off, potentially paving the way for advances in spintronics. (2019-01-29)

Meet the quantum fridge -- at 3 atoms in size, it's much smaller than a minibar
Researchers in Singapore have built a refrigerator that's just three atoms big. This quantum fridge won't keep your drinks cold, but it's cool proof of physics operating at the smallest scales. The work is described in a paper published Jan. 14 in Nature Communications. (2019-01-29)

Speed of light: Toward a future quantum internet
University of Toronto Engineering researchers have demonstrated proof-of-principle for a device that could serve as the backbone of a future quantum Internet. U of T professor Hoi-Kwong Lo and his collaborators have developed a prototype for a key element for all-photonic quantum repeaters, a critical step in long-distance quantum communication. (2019-01-28)

Better safeguards for sensitive information
Despite being the most advanced quantum technology, secure encryption of information units based on a method called quantum key distribution (QKD) is currently limited by the channel's capacity to send or share secret bits. In a recent study published in EPJ D, Gan Wang, who is affiliated with both Peking University, Bejing, China, and the University of York, UK, and colleagues show how to better approach the secret key capacity by improving the channel's lower boundary. (2019-01-28)

Quantifying how much quantum information can be eavesdropped
Summary The most basic type of quantum information processing is quantum entanglement. In a new study published in EPJ B, Zhaonan Zhang from Shaanxi Normal University, Xi'an, China, and colleagues have provided a much finer characterisation of the distributions of entanglement in multi-qubit systems than previously available. These findings can be used in quantum cryptography to estimate the quantity of information an eavesdropper can capture regarding the secret encryption key. (2019-01-28)

JILA researchers uncover quantum structure of buckyballs
JILA researchers have measured hundreds of individual quantum energy levels in the buckyball, a spherical cage of 60 carbon atoms. It's the largest molecule that has ever been analyzed at this level of experimental detail in the history of quantum mechanics. Fully understanding and controlling this molecule's quantum details could lead to new scientific fields and applications, such as an entire quantum computer contained in a single buckyball. (2019-01-28)

NUS engineers develop novel strategy for designing tiny semiconductor particles for wide-ranging applications
NUS Engineers have developed a cost-effective and scalable strategy for designing tiny semiconductor particles known as transition metal dichalcogenide quantum dots (TMD QDs) which can potentially generate cancer-killing properties. The team is also looking to optimise TMD QDs for applications such as the next generation TV and electronic device screens, advanced electronics components and even solar cells. (2019-01-24)

New water splitting catalyst could make it easier to generate solar fuel
Water splitting, the process of harvesting solar energy to generate energy-dense fuels, could be simplified thanks to new research including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2019-01-23)

Laser physics: A new home for optical solitons
Physicists based at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich and the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics have generated dissipative solitons in passive, free-space resonators. (2019-01-23)

New insights into magnetic quantum effects in solids
Using a new computational method, an international collaboration has succeeded for the first time in systematically investigating magnetic quantum effects in the well-known 3D pyrochlore Heisenberg model. The surprising finding: physical quantum phases are formed only for small spin values. (2019-01-22)

New applications for encapsulated nanoparticles with promising properties
The Polymerisation Process research group of the POLYMAT institute of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country has managed to efficiently encapsulate semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots of various sizes into polymer particles; great stability in terms of their optical properties and good fluorescence control when combining different quantum dots have been achieved. The possible applicability of these materials as sensors of volatile organic compounds has also been explored. (2019-01-22)

Scientists discover new quantum spin liquid
An international research team led by the University of Liverpool and McMaster University has made a significant breakthrough in the search for new states of matter. In a study published in the journal Nature Physics, researchers show that the perovskite-related metal oxide, TbInO3, exhibits a quantum spin liquid state, a long-sought-after and unusual state of matter. (2019-01-21)

Classic double-slit experiment in a new light
An international research group has developed a new X-ray spectroscopy method based on the classical double-slit experiment to gain new insights into the physical properties of solids. (2019-01-18)

Collision resonances between ultracold atom and molecules visualized for the first time
For the first time, a team led by Prof. Jian-Wei Pan and Prof. Bo Zhao at the University of Science and Technology of China, have successfully observed scattering resonances between atoms and molecules at ultralow temperatures, shedding light on the quantum nature of atom-molecule interactions that have so far only been discussed in theory. (2019-01-18)

New scale for electronegativity rewrites the chemistry textbook
Electronegativity is one of the most well-known models for explaining why chemical reactions occur. Now, Martin Rahm from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, has redefined the concept with a new, more comprehensive scale. His work, undertaken with colleagues including a Nobel Prize-winner, has been published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. (2019-01-17)

Understanding insulators with conducting edges
Insulators that are conducting at their edges hold promise for interesting technological applications. However, until now their characteristics have not been fully understood. Physicists at Goethe University have now modelled what are known as topological insulators with the help of ultracold quantum gases. In the current issue of Physical Review Letters, they demonstrate how the edge states could be experimentally detected. (2019-01-17)

New quantum structures in super-chilled helium may mirror early days of universe
Experimental proof of a decades-old prediction opens a pathway to recreate possible conditions of the early universe here on earth. (2019-01-16)

Just like flipping a switch -- in only half a picosecond
Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have discovered spin flips happen in one half of one trillionth of a second, or half a picosecond in the course of a chemical reaction. To understand how fast it is -- watches count in seconds, sporting games are timed in 10ths of a second, and light travels just under 12 inches in one-billionth of a second. Spin flips are faster. (2019-01-16)

Physicists experimentally verify the multipartite generalized Hardy's paradox
In a recent article published in Science Bulletin, a joint team led by Professors Jian-Wei Pan, Chao-Yang Lu and Nai-Le Liu at the University of Science and Technology of China, and Jing-Ling Chen at Nankai University, has for the first time verified the multipartite Hardy's paradox in experiment. (2019-01-15)

Brilliant glow of paint-on semiconductors comes from ornate quantum physics
A new wave of semiconductors that can be painted on is on the horizon. It bears the promise of revolutionizing lighting all over again and of transforming solar energy. Ornate quantum particle action, revealed here, that drives the new material's properties defies the workings of established semiconductors. (2019-01-15)

Experiments detect entropy production in mesoscopic quantum systems
One of the most important aims of contemporary scientific research is finding out what makes the production of entropy predominate. This aim explains the current interest in studying mesoscopic systems, which are not as small as individual atoms but nevertheless display well-defined quantum behavior. (2019-01-14)

Arbitrary quantum channel simulation for a superconducting qubit
Recently, a research team led by Prof. Luyan Sun from Tsinghua University has successfully demonstrated the arbitrary quantum channel simulation for a single qubit in a superconducting quantum circuits, which could be used for simulating the evolution of a quantum bit in arbitrary physical environment. (2019-01-11)

Reviewing advanced applications in drug delivery and medicine
This review seeks to analyze current advances of potential applications of graphene and its family of nano-materials for drug delivery and other major biomedical purposes. (2019-01-11)

More stable light comes from intentionally 'squashed' quantum dots
Intentionally 'squashing' colloidal quantum dots during chemical synthesis creates dots capable of stable, 'blink-free' light emission that is fully comparable with the light produced by dots made with more complex processes. (2019-01-10)

Programming light on a chip
Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a new integrated photonics platform that can store light and electrically control its frequency (or color) in an integrated circuit. (2019-01-08)

Machine learning and quantum mechanics team up to understand water at the atomic level
Why is water densest at around 4 degrees Celsius? Why does ice float? Why heavy water has a different melting point compared to normal water? Why do snowflakes have a six-fold symmetry? A collaborative study, led by researchers in EPFL and just published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, provides physical insights into these questions by marrying data-driven machine learning techniques and quantum mechanics. (2019-01-07)

Quantum scientists demonstrate world-first 3D atomic-scale quantum chip architecture
UNSW scientists have shown that their pioneering single atom technology can be adapted to building 3D silicon quantum chips -- with precise interlayer alignment and highly accurate measurement of spin states. The 3D architecture is considered a major step in the development of a blueprint to build a large-scale quantum computer. (2019-01-07)

Excitons pave the way to more efficient electronics
After developing a method to control exciton flows at room temperature, EPFL scientists have discovered new properties of these quasiparticles that can lead to more energy-efficient electronic devices. (2019-01-04)

Quantum chemistry on quantum computers
A new quantum algorithm has been implemented for quantum chemical calculations on quantum computers to predict complex chemical reactions without exponential/combinatorial explosion, giving exact solutions of Schroedinger Equations for chemistry, for the first time. (2019-01-02)

Physicists record 'lifetime' of graphene qubits
Researchers from MIT and elsewhere have recorded, for the first time, quantum coherence of a graphene-based superconducting qubit, meaning how long it stays in superposition to compute with two logical states simultaneously. The work is a key step forward for practical quantum computing. (2018-12-31)

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